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Thread: carbon build up in 30 BR barrel

  1. #1
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    Oct 2010
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    carbon build up in 30 BR barrel

    Just got home from the NC 200-300 Yd. match and bore scoped my Bartlein barreled 30Br rifle( which I shot very bad- finished 24 out of 27 shooters) and have a lot of black carbon build-up in the lands. My question is what do you guys use to clean the carbon out of barrels?
    Thank you for advice.
    Jeff Fountain
    PS At the last match there I finished 4 @ 200 yds.

  2. #2
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    There are two kinds of carbon fouling. Carbon on down the barrel and the infamous carbon ring right at the junction of the neck and rifling.

    For the latter, search on here for "carbon ring".

    For the former, there are many ways to get it out and many different products. For the really stubborn stuff, I use repeated treatments of Bore Tech Carbon Remover and some scrubbing with a brass brush. Some folks use USP Bore Paste or Iosso.

    Greg J

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by reelxprs View Post
    ... have a lot of black carbon build-up in the lands. My question is what do you guys use to clean the carbon out of barrels?
    Run 3 to 5 tight fitting patches of J-B Nonembedding Bore Cleaning Compound [get the large size, it will last forever]: http://www.brownells.com/gun-cleanin...-prod1160.aspx back in forth in the entire barrel. Clean the barrel before and after using it. It goes in gray and Always comes out black.

    And, on a slightly over sized brush, at the end of the neck chamber. Twirl it about 30 revolutions. How much? About the size of a good sized pea [the vegetable].

  4. #4
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    And...

    When you get the carbon out and it shoots poorly once again, start saving for a new barrel.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilbur View Post
    When you get the carbon out and it shoots poorly once again, start saving for a new barrel.

    ......How many rounds are on the barrel? That's one question I have. What type of cleaners are being used is another?

    You also have to be aware that even if your using the same type/brand of powder that they will vary from lot to lot in how clean they burn etc....it might not be the barrel. Also I feel some of the liquid bore cleaners work better than others.

    I don't like the paste cleaners. I'm o.k. with JB bore compound and Rem.40x bore cleaner for working on the carbon build up/fouling.

    Later, Frank
    Bartlein Barrels

  6. #6
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    Remington 40x is my carbon remover of choice. lee

  7. #7
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    Oct 2003
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    State of Confusion
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    Kg1

    KG1 got a bunch of black stuff out of my 30 BR barrel. I don't know if it was that or the repair Leupold did on my scope, but it shoots predictably now.

  8. #8
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    nw va
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    Kg-2

    KG-2 is like J-B, IOSSO, but sooo much better!!

  9. #9
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    There is only one way

    To get carbon out once it has been ironed on, MECHANICALLY. You can use up a dozen brushes and still may have carbon if it hasn't ever been removed. I recommend taking a worn out brush and wrapping 000 steel wool around it until it is a tight fit, apply a mixture of 1/2 Kroil and Mystery Oil or ATF to the brush/wool and scrub until you don't see black any more. You will need to add wool as you go to keep a good tight fit.

    Folks who don't get to look into their barrels have no idea what is in them. Usually, I see carbon, and lots of it, in the barrels of friends I look down. A little 320 Clover brand would help a bit. 320, used right, will help you. It requires a feel for smoothness but if one has a barrel that ain't shooting, what does one have to loose? I see barrels brought to life once they are smoothened out some. Check out the Final Finish kits and you may get an idea of what I am talking about.

    Pete
    Last edited by Pete Wass; 06-17-2014 at 08:02 PM.

  10. #10
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    I'm almost 70!

    Quote Originally Posted by stool View Post
    gonna disagree pete,
    chemicals and time will remove carbon......
    I don't have the time - - - -. Yes, chemicals will remove carbon but if someone has a hard build up, it will take a very long time and a lot of work that can be shortened up considerably. Barrels wear out anyway so scrubbing on them some ain't gonna change their life cycle much, from my experience.

    There are some good tests of gun cleaning solvents on Youtube. I have watched the ones on copper removal; sort of myth busters, if you will. They will show one how effective chemicals are and which ones. I don't know if the same is true for carbon but I will look when I get a chance.

    Pete

  11. #11
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    Jul 2006
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    cleaning with steel wool

    Recently I read an account of one fellow's use of a short section of cleaning rod, powered by a cordless screwdriver, using .30 cal. bronze brush, spun for 30 seconds. There is also Tony Boyer's old method that involves filling an over sized (6.5?) nylon brush with IOSSO and doing the same thing for less time manually. I have also considered wrapping a 6mm brush with an oiled patch that slightly overhangs the front of the brush, and applying IOSSO to the patch right where the brush ends, and spinning that by hand. Do any of you have any other methods that you like, that I have not mentioned?
    Thanks,
    Boyd[/QUOTE]

    I'm not aiming this at anyone in particular so I don't want anyone to take offense to it but I have to say. We've dealt with the cordless screw driver and a shaft and guys using an abrasive like steel wool, emery cloth etc....if you do this your on your own. You wreck/damage the chamber/barrel you have to take the responsibility for what your doing to it.

    You won't catch me using the cordless drill method.

    Later, Frank
    Bartlein Barrels


    The above was taking from a different thread on here about using a cordless drill to clean the carbon ring out of the chamber/throat area of the barrel. Again I'm going to say you start doing stuff like this your on your own. You have to take responsibility for what you do to the gun/barrel. I've seen too many damaged barrels from cleaning! From guys using steel wool to guys leaving patches in the barrels (and the guns get shot or tried to get shot and the patch is still in it), guys mixing solvents and they have no clue how the solvents are going to react with one another and how it's going to react with the steel and it pits/etches the bore etc....

    Later, Frank

  12. #12
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    In my seach

    to find something that would take lead from Rimfire barrels, I found on the internet a product called Big 45 Metal Cleaner. It looks like steel wool but is said not to harm metal surfaces. I haven't bought any yet but may. Lead is a problem with RF barrels; at least the three barrels I use. like Carbon, once ironed in, it is a B word to take out. Solvents may take it out but I have yet to find one that is fast at removing it. With RF's ya got wax, lead and carbon, in layers, all of which come off slowly. In a typical rimfire match at least 3, 25 record bull targets are shot and some times either 5 or 6, without much time to clean between cards. All of my barrels need a lot of cleaning after a match. I have used every combination of cleaner and mixture of oil I have seen posted here and while some of them help the process, none of them are instant.

    The same is true for CF rifles only we deal with copper and carbon. Same deal is true. The advantage of CF is the lesser number of shots per match BUT there is a heck of a lot more powder burned and more copper exposed in a 30 Cal outfit. Been doing it since 1998 so I have at least some experience with the process.

    Pete

  13. #13
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    Pete must not know who you are Frank.

  14. #14
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    I think that it is obvious that the more aggressive the cleaning method, the more potential that it has for doing damage if mishandled. I use a guide that was made by Chet Whitebread. It has tubes that fit both the rod and the guide, and extend as far forward as they can, without interfering with either the brush or the patch at the back of their strokes. Every time that I take a rod out of the guide, I wipe it off. When using the rod, I pay close attention to so that its handle stays in line with the bore during the whole stroke. When I resort to using an abrasive, I am even more careful, and clean out the guide and rod tubes as well as the barrel after finishing with the abrasive. Some barrels seem to tolerate being shot dirty more than others. I try to keep this in mind, so that I do not clean more often than necessary to maintain accuracy. When I do clean I check my work with a bore scope with an eye toward using as few rod cycles a possible, while still getting the job done. Bore scopes can lead you astray in that it is easy to get too preoccupied with getting every speck out of a barrel, when the methods needed to do so may actually do more harm than good. I believe that what is needed is to clean to a consistent starting place so that things do not pile up from cleaning to cleaning. Different powders can require different cleaning regimens. If I was a barrel maker, knowing what I do about how people can misconstrue simple instructions, I would be very conservative in my cleaning recommendations. For most of humanity, the clearest possible instructions often do not result in the reader doing the thing exactly correctly, unless they have an intuitive grasp of the situation, which is rare. Think about it. How many shooters have you seen using their cleaning rod as if they were trying to clear a blocked drain pipe, unaware of the bend that they were putting in the rod on every stroke? Over the years, I have come a long way from that three piece, brushed finish, aluminum rod, with the loop jag.

  15. #15
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    I don't believe in beating up a barrel by cleaning it. Instead, I stay on top of the copper and carbon instead of waiting until it can be a problem,,,oops,,, what is the problem with a little copper or carbon in a barrel. I did say "a little".
    I'm with Frank Green on the intensity of the cleaning regimen. I don't shoot rim fire in competition, only center fire and the backyard rifle I use on squirrels and rabbits doesn't know about my big name and my reputation on the center fire circuit. Also, I don't count the misses on rabbits, squirrels, coons, or possums. I only brag about the hits. Come to think of it, those are all in the dark and with one hand hind my back.
    It's raining and I'm bored.

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