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Thread: In My Tool Box

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Nampa Idaho
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    795

    In My Tool Box

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    This protractor was passed on to me at the shipyard. I had little use for it, but hung on it because of the transfer of ownership and date. The war had been over for 20 years and this was still floating around the machine shop.

    When people retired they often sold or gave tools to friends in the shop. I bought a beat-up Kennedy machinist chest for $5.00 and took it home. I have grown quite fond of it.....I liked the patina.

    Mort

    The photo is hard to see but reads 11\15\44
    Last edited by dmort; 01-05-2022 at 06:54 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    644

    Whoa

    I have one exactly like that but with no history behind. Beautiful

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lower Dakota Territory
    Posts
    2,305
    Stan Ware's youngest son Justin was an extremely talented wood worker and engraver. In the early '90's, Stan was doing a lot of high end trap and skeet shotguns. Barely in his teens, Justin was doing a lot of the wood work and all of the engraving. His engraving quality was such that he was offered an apprenticeship at the Remington Custom Shop during the Summer of 1995 after the school year was over. Tragically, at age 16, Justin died in a car accident in Oct of 1994.

    Justin's engraving tools and other tools were in a oak tool chest he had made. Stan covered that tool chest with a soft blanket and it sat in the same spot, undisturbed, for well over a decade. He took the blanket off once and showed me the chest and tools...it was an emotional moment for him.

    One day, several years later, something just didn't look right in the shop. The tool chest wasn't there. Knowing Stan the way I did, I knew better than to say anything. Later that day as I was getting ready to go, He handed me this and said: "I got these for Justin for his 14th birthday. Now they're yours. Put 'em to work."

    I had no words. And as Stan requested, I use 'em.

    Somewhere up there, Justin is finishing the engraving on a nice Browning Citori that Stan just blued.









    Good shootin'.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    Nampa Idaho
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    795
    When first I saw your post I found it hard to reply, but the outcome was the best thing that could happen.......it went to the right person.

    Mort

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Nampa Idaho
    Posts
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    Thumb lock, lever lock and no lock. I have examples of all three. The locking device is something I seldom if ever use. I do like the appearance of the Lufkin lever design on this mic which came with a standard. It even has a knurl pattern on the end. Pretty cool.

    Mort

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    676
    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
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ID:	25181Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	25182Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20220104_123306.jpg 
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Size:	2.32 MB 
ID:	25183
    This protractor was passed on to me at the shipyard. I had little use for it, but hung on it because of the transfer of ownership and date.
    The war had been over for 20 years and this was still floating around the machine shop.

    When people retired they often sold or gave tools to friends in the shop.
    I bought a beat-up Kennedy machinist chest for $5.00 and took it home.
    I have grown quite fond of it.....I liked the patina.

    Mort

    The photo is hard to see but reads 11\15\44
    Infrequently used .
    I did mostly aircraft support work (DF and EW) for self protection.

    When you needed to place something on a fuselage at a particular angle,
    say for a DF antenna array, it was the only tool you could use.

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