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Thread: 222 Rem best twist

  1. #1
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    222 Rem best twist

    I read in a nother forum that ""The 222 with 50-52 gr bullets and 1-12 twist is where it earned its reputation as a tack-driver, "" I allways though it was a 1:14 twist that made a 222 a tack driver ?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArtinNC View Post
    I read in a nother forum that ""The 222 with 50-52 gr bullets and 1-12 twist is where it earned its reputation as a tack-driver, "" I allways though it was a 1:14 twist that made a 222 a tack driver ?
    yes bullet length(weight) and twist are the answer. my 223 with 14 t is a 50-53 tool.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArtinNC View Post
    I read in a nother forum that ""The 222 with 50-52 gr bullets and 1-12 twist is where it earned its reputation as a tack-driver, "" I allways though it was a 1:14 twist that made a 222 a tack driver ?
    My 1968 40 XBR 222 has a 14 twist. I’m pretty sure that was most common when the 222 was winning matches in the 1950’s-60’s.

  4. #4
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    Twist

    I think my Rem 722 is 1 in 14. 50 to 55 grain bullets.

    Mort

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1911Nut View Post
    My 1968 40 XBR 222 has a 14 twist. I’m pretty sure that was most common when the 222 was winning matches in the 1950’s-60’s.
    Back in the days before the .223 all .224 center fire cartridges were 14” twist. In fact the .223 started life at 14” then 12” an then 9”. We can thank the military for that. The original 14” barrels in colder weather would not stabilize the military 55 gr. solid jacket bullets very well. They were a little to long.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by martin zuck View Post
    Back in the days before the .223 all .224 center fire cartridges were 14” twist. In fact the .223 started life at 14” then 12” an then 9”. We can thank the military for that. The original 14” barrels in colder weather would not stabilize the military 55 gr. solid jacket bullets very well. They were a little to long.
    In fact Sierra still makes a 63 gr. semi point bullet that shoots very good with a 14” twist. The length determines twist rate not weight

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by martin zuck View Post
    Back in the days before the .223 all .224 center fire cartridges were 14” twist. In fact the .223 started life at 14” then 12” an then 9”. We can thank the military for that. The original 14” barrels in colder weather would not stabilize the military 55 gr. solid jacket bullets very well. They were a little to long.
    me thinks you have some misinformation.
    when the m249 came along it came with a tracer and it more twist as it was long for its weight.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by martin zuck View Post
    The length determines twist rate not weight
    Actually, DENSITY of the bullet determines twist rate, not the length. You can get an 80 grain HPBT bullet to stabilize in a .221 Fireball, assuming the twist rate is appropriate. Change bullet composition to say, copper, and you might need more spin to stabilize the projectile. Or, change part of the core from lead to a lighter material, and you might encounter the same situation, hence faster twists for the M16A2, when the US adopted the Belgian designed 62 grain bullet (w/steel insert), and the associated 5.56 mm tracer (lower density material, replacing part of the core).

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsmithsr View Post
    when the m249 came along it came with a tracer and it more twist as it was long for its weight.
    The M-249 was originally built in Belgum and used Belgian designed ammo. The added length of the tracer added burn time, as existing 5.56 mm bullets did not have sufficient capacity for the desired performance. (Provide trace out to 800 yards?) The US adopted the ammo, and redesigned the M-16 rifles to use them, hence the M-16A2 (and follow-ons) and M-4 series of rifles and carbines. Initial barrel twist was 1 7", with later rifles changing to 1-9". (Think carbines have remained 1-7".)
    BTW, the original bullet for the 5.56 mm cartridge was not 55 grains.

  10. #10
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    I guess I should have made clear that that I was referring to the early days of the AR rifles. Back in the early 60’s when I was in Pittsburg Eugene Stoner showed up looking for some one to do some work for his company. At that time they were experimenting with 14” or maybe it was 12” barrels. Up until then 99% of .224 center fire rifles were 14”. To make a long story short they were finding out that in colder weather the solid jacket 55 gr. bullets they were using at the time sometimes were not stabilizing. When the .223 became commercialized it came out with a 12” twist. If it not been for the military the .223 would also have been 14”. The solid jacket 55gr bullet was a little longer than commercial 55’s. That’s all I know about AR type rifles!

    While it’s true length is not the only factor involving bullet stabilization it’s very important.Cases in point! In a .222 with a 14” T barrel a 60 gr. spritzer will not stabilize but a round nose 63 gr. shoots good. The spritzer is longer then the round nose. They weight the SAME. I realize velocity is also a factor. Try shooting certain 68gr bullets out of a 15”T 6ppc. Some times it works and some times it don’t. I realize my observations aren’t very technical but they work for me. Besides I slipped on ice the other day and banged myself up a little so I am recuperating.i

  11. #11
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    twist

    Is that why a 5.56 tracer will shoot in the same place as the ball round? The tracer is longer but the back end is tracer powder. Doug

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Casner View Post
    Is that why a 5.56 tracer will shoot in the same place as the ball round? The tracer is longer but the back end is tracer powder. Doug
    As I said earlier,my knowledge is quite limited so let’s just leave it go at that.

  13. #13
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    I tried a 1-13

    last fall with a 6 Beggs, 67 gn bullets and LT32 powder and it doesn't shoot all that great. Bad barrel or wrong twist rate?

    Pete

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Casner View Post
    Is that why a 5.56 tracer will shoot in the same place as the ball round? The tracer is longer but the back end is tracer powder. Doug
    Tracer bullets NEVER fly the same as a ball round. Why? The ball round keeps most of its mass in flight, the tracer's is affected by the tracer's burn. For starters, the bullet leaves the barrel with mass, and as it flies dowrange, loses mass as the tracer compound burns. It also flies differently, due to the reduced low pressure at the base, resulting from the tracer burn. Dispersion on a tracer is greater, due to the uneven burn of the "pellet". Ever wonder why some of the best aerial gunners removed the tracers from their ammo loadouts? Now you know why.

  15. #15
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    Thanks Asa

    Never could figure out how they shot in the same place. I guess they dont. Loaded and packed alot of M60 and saw rounds at Lake City. Never had enough time to shoot them. Had to be a gunner. Thanks, Doug

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