Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: One of Our Repair Jobs You Might Like

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    8,126

    One of Our Repair Jobs You Might Like

    https://forum.accurateshooter.com/th...-shop.4066213/

    The link has several pictures and explanations. Just click on it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Surprise, AZ
    Posts
    418
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    https://forum.accurateshooter.com/th...-shop.4066213/

    The link has several pictures and explanations. Just click on it.
    I am very impressed by the video you linked a few posts down in the other thread. Your men barely utter a word between them, each man doing exactly what it makes sense for him to, maintaining constant progress on the workpiece. I can scarcely see the operation being any more efficient.

    As always, thanks for sharing!

    GsT

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    761
    Have you worked on any "Oligarch Yachts"?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Nampa Idaho
    Posts
    816
    Jackie, as always I really enjoy your info and photos that show what machinist work entails when working in a shipyard.

    I did some work on ship shafting and rudders in the shop but never touched a prop.

    We had a submarine in dry dock where the prop or screw had already been fitted and I was sent out of the shop to help "ring it". So a Naval Officer from the sub and three of us from the yard were all standing on minimal scaffolding on the aft end of the sub,the bottom of the dry dock not looking close enough for me. A hard hat wasn't going to help anyone here and the Naval Officer wasn't wearing one so I had nothing to worry about. Anyway the three of us took turns swinging a heavy sledge hammer hitting the shaft end of a special wrench fitted to a special nut that tightened the screw. When the impact of the hammer on the wrench handle sounded correct we were done. We had "rung the prop".

    I only did that once but glad to have had the experience.

    Mort
    Last edited by dmort; 05-19-2022 at 09:08 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    8,126
    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    Jackie, as always I really enjoy your info and photos that show what machinist work entails when working in a shipyard.

    I did some work on ship shafting and rudders in the shop but never touched a prop.

    We had a submarine in dry dock where the prop or screw had already been fitted and I was sent out of the shop to help "ring it". So a Naval Officer from the sub and three of us from the yard were all standing on minimal scaffolding on the aft end of the sub,the bottom of the dry dock not looking close enough for me. A hard hat wasn't going to help anyone here and the Naval Officer wasn't wearing one so I had nothing to worry about. Anyway the three of us took turns swinging a heavy sledge hammer hitting the shaft end of a special wrench fitted to a special nut that tightened the screw. When the impact of the hammer on the wrench handle sounded correct we were done. We had "rung the prop".

    I only did that once but glad to have had the experience.

    Mort
    What you are describing happens on a daily basis in shipyards throughout the world.

    Prop damage is an ongoing problem in any boat. Inland Push Boats are particularly hard on them.

    When a vessel is dry docked for prop damage, the shipyard will take a indicator run out on the shaft taper. If the runout exceeds .030 inch, they will generally pull the shaft, send it to us and if nothing else is amiss, we can straighten the shaft and they can reinstall it.

    If they put on a different prop, or do any extensive repair on the original, we will have to refit the taper of the prop to the shaft before it it all put back in.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lower Dakota Territory
    Posts
    2,419
    Jackie, the work your shop does always fascinates me. To work on stuff that large to the tolerances you do is impressive. Then figure in the environment those boats work in... amazing.

    Thanks for taking the time to show this. -Al

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •