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Thread: Moore Scraping Method

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Nampa Idaho
    Posts
    789

    Moore Scraping Method

    When I was working at the shipyard, I was taught how to scrape by a tall slim good old boy from Texas. He was easy to get along with and had a lot of patience.
    We were doing high-pressure steam casing flanges for the aircraft carrier Midway. There were four boiler rooms so we had 8 casing halves to do. The pattern we did looked like little sails and I thought it looked attractive enough it was a shame to cover them up.

    I would sometimes see it on lathe beds for oil retention.

    The videos I've seen on scraping never looked like what I had learned. I just recently found one on the Moore scraping method. Now I know what I had been taught back when actually has a name.

    Mort
    Last edited by dmort; 10-05-2021 at 05:53 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    393
    Over on the practicalmachinist.com forum, scroll down to the machine rebuild section.
    A guy with the last name King puts on scraping classes around the country and hangs out there.

    Hal

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Maine & Palm Coast, Fl
    Posts
    6,472

    Robin Rinsetti

    is a guy who has done some Vids on the Moore Method. He is a master of everything he does, in my opinion.

    Pete

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    California...unfortunately
    Posts
    751
    Gents,

    IIRC, the Moore pattern comes from the Moore machine tool company, maker of the well known Moore jig boring machine. I've no experience with jig borers but have talked with those that do, and the Moore's have a stellar reputation.

    The Moore pattern is quite attractive, and as Mort said it's a shame to cover it up. It kinda looks like the crescent shaped cuts that are put in ways and such to hold oil, only not as deep.

    I wonder if it offers any advantages over conventional scraping techniques?

    Justin

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    8,076
    Scraping machine surfaces is definitely an art. It is also quite tedious.

    My Dad had a complete set of scraping tools, not only for doing cast iron machine ways or any other flat surface, but also for Babbitt bearings.

    I never did much machine way scraping, but did quite a bit of Babbitt bearing scraping in back in my early years.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    704
    scrape fit babbit bearings...been there done that.....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Surprise, AZ
    Posts
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    ... It is also quite tedious.
    Amen! I took a scraping class perhaps a dozen years ago, and that was my take-away. I still have a hand-scraper, but probably wouldn't scrape anything except for decoration.

    GsT

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Maine & Palm Coast, Fl
    Posts
    6,472

    I did it for a living

    for a few years after my Air Force Service and found it fascination and very technical. We had power scrapers back then as well as the hand scrapers. I left that business for what I thought was a more glamorous life in Sales, certainly way more money, but my heart always was back in the shop, solving problems and making new ones out of old ones. It's a shame the Trades didn't pay more money back in the day. Also, that business was cyclical and a roller coaster ride then, job security wise. If I could go back, I would go back to the shop floor though, in spite of the downs.

    Pete

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