Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Falling Blocks

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    sacramento
    Posts
    70

    Falling Blocks

    Could someone refer me to a smith that could chamber a Hall Falling block Action? Thank You Michael Taner

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    upstate, N.Y.
    Posts
    2,999
    Quote Originally Posted by chaymbrd View Post
    Could someone refer me to a smith that could chamber a Hall Falling block Action? Thank You Michael Taner
    ASSRA site is your best bet.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lower Dakota Territory
    Posts
    2,214
    I'd talk to Lee Shaver. -Al

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ca.
    Posts
    951
    The various falling block actions are pretty easy to do. Depending on where you live one of the top benchrest smiths on this site who is closest to you should be able to help you out.
    What will you be chambering it in and using it for one of them might already have that chambering reamer is why I ask.
    Last edited by Louis.J; 07-10-2021 at 09:55 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    sacramento
    Posts
    70

    falling blocks

    Thank You for the replies. Where is Al Shaver? Michael

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lower Dakota Territory
    Posts
    2,214
    Quote Originally Posted by chaymbrd View Post
    Thank You for the replies. Where is Lee Shaver? Michael
    Here's a link to his website. Lee does a lot of falling block stuff...give him a call and directly discuss it. I'd suggest contacting Allan Hall about the basic tenon dimensions.

    http://stores.leeshavergunsmithing.com/

    Good shootin'. -Al

    P.S. If you want to rehome that Hall falling block, feel free to contact me....hint, hint. -Al

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    370
    Try
    Steve Baldwin in Oklahoma
    http://www.baldwinsights.com/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Florida Panhandle
    Posts
    684
    A little history about falling blocks but not as far back as to Buffalo hunter rifles.

    After my nephew finished his 1st Iraq tour with the 4th ID in 2004, I went over to Ft Hood to visit. He gave me a tour of his tank company's hardware. In the hull of a M1 looking at the back end of the 120mm main gun, I noticed a couple of things. First, it was manufactured by Rhinemetal and secondly, it was a falling block action. A little research later taught me that the US main battle tank weapon is a linear descendent of the famously effective German WWII 88mm and still made by the same company. If you look at pictures of the breech mech of an 88, it is visually identical to a modern 120mm.

    The recoil lugs are a little bigger than we're used to but a 300,000 grain "bullet" at 5,000 fps+ is a bit more muzzle energy too.

    Seems to me that whenever I get the chance to see a large US Naval gun, they tend to be an "interrupted screw" lockup.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PICT0018.jpg 
Views:	128 
Size:	323.9 KB 
ID:	24799

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    washington.........STATE that is.
    Posts
    11,365
    Quote Originally Posted by TomD View Post
    A little history about falling blocks but not as far back as to Buffalo hunter rifles.

    After my nephew finished his 1st Iraq tour with the 4th ID in 2004, I went over to Ft Hood to visit. He gave me a tour of his tank company's hardware. In the hull of a M1 looking at the back end of the 120mm main gun, I noticed a couple of things. First, it was manufactured by Rhinemetal and secondly, it was a falling block action. A little research later taught me that the US main battle tank weapon is a linear descendent of the famously effective German WWII 88mm and still made by the same company. If you look at pictures of the breech mech of an 88, it is visually identical to a modern 120mm.

    The recoil lugs are a little bigger than we're used to but a 300,000 grain "bullet" at 5,000 fps+ is a bit more muzzle energy too.

    Seems to me that whenever I get the chance to see a large US Naval gun, they tend to be an "interrupted screw" lockup.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PICT0018.jpg 
Views:	128 
Size:	323.9 KB 
ID:	24799
    Yew shore do take a nice picture Florida

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •