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Thread: Glues for Gluing actions to stocks

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woodend, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    18

    Glues for Gluing actions to stocks

    G'day all,
    I'm reasonably proficient at bedding actions, but I've never glued an action to a stock, not even accidentally!
    I've assumed you do a regular bedding job (I'm going to do my LBRP Stolle Panda and a BAT DS RB RP Reject into new stocks) then rough it up a bit and then glue it in.
    Any advice you all could offer would be greatly appreciated and any info on the bedding job that helps to do a glue in easier. would also be great.
    Also preferred glues that everyone uses. If it exists, I'd also like a glue that can allow for easy removal (I'm self-taught stock maker, so want to trial different designs every now and then)
    I use Devcon for bedding and make my own pillars etc to suit my stocks (as you do).
    Many thanks for any help.
    Regards Geoff W
    Victoria, Australia

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by ned kelly View Post
    G'day all,
    I'm reasonably proficient at bedding actions, but I've never glued an action to a stock, not even accidentally!
    I've assumed you do a regular bedding job (I'm going to do my LBRP Stolle Panda and a BAT DS RB RP Reject into new stocks) then rough it up a bit and then glue it in.
    Any advice you all could offer would be greatly appreciated and any info on the bedding job that helps to do a glue in easier. would also be great.
    Also preferred glues that everyone uses. If it exists, I'd also like a glue that can allow for easy removal (I'm self-taught stock maker, so want to trial different designs every now and then)
    I use Devcon for bedding and make my own pillars etc to suit my stocks (as you do).
    Many thanks for any help.
    Regards Geoff W
    Victoria, Australia
    JB Weld - I actually paint a thin coat in with a small art paint brush. (You can get it at Bunnings or Mitre 10)
    It is black in colour, so might not suit some of your nice timber stocks, unless you are hiding the glue line.

    As long as you clean the action properly it wont be coming out unless you heat it.

    When you want it to come out - I use a cylinder heater around 1/2 in diameter and 6 long, insert where bolt goes and around 2minutes later its ready to be popped out. You can of course use the traditional iron but this is quicker and heats more uniform.

    BTW I use the Aussie bedding compound - Arma grout. He also has the dyes - Black, brown etc

    Cheers
    Michael

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,004
    I bought a box of 100 "acid brushes" a long time ago. I use one of these and use a scissor and cut off about half off the bristles. That makes it stiffer and works much better for me spreading around the thick epoxy.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Williamson County, Texas
    Posts
    315
    JB Weld to glue the action, curious why is it not a popular one for bedding?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woodend, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    18
    G'day All,
    thanks for the info, but I noticed at the local hardware chain there are many JB Weld products.
    Any particular one or just the regular JB Weld?
    Many thanks, Geoff

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
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    8,053
    Quote Originally Posted by NezRongero View Post
    JB Weld to glue the action, curious why is it not a popular one for bedding?
    Nez, JB tends to be a little runny for bedding. I have used it though.

    As for the glue in, I do use JB Weld.

    But for my next bedding job, I am going to use the ProBed that Al Nyhus recommended.

    http://benchrest.com/showthread.php?...-Atlas-project
    Last edited by jackie schmidt; 05-17-2021 at 09:29 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by ned kelly View Post
    G'day All,
    thanks for the info, but I noticed at the local hardware chain there are many JB Weld products.
    Any particular one or just the regular JB Weld?
    Many thanks, Geoff
    The original cold weld formula

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Williamson County, Texas
    Posts
    315
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    Nez, JB tends to be a little runny for bedding. I have used it though.

    As for the glue in, I do use JB Weld.

    But for my next bedding job, I am going to use the ProBed that Al Nyhus recommended.

    http://benchrest.com/showthread.php?...-Atlas-project
    Thanks, Jackie

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woodend, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    18
    Thanks for the info, very much appreciated.
    Cheerio Geoff

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    95
    Sorry for the naive question...
    Does we glue on top of a bedding, or we use the glue to bed...?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ohio
    Posts
    52
    Just offering an opinion.......

    For many years I have used Devcon Plastic Steel (or Aluminum) - the 16 hour cure, for all of my bedding. It is an exceptional (but expensive) product. I bed with the putty, and glue in with the liquid version (less viscous than the putty - applied in a thin even coating with a very short bristle brush to the original cured and cleaned bedding surface).

    For most epoxies (especially this product) proper measurement is VERY important. I use a scale, and very thoroughly mix the parts. Too little resin and the product gets brittle, too little catalyst and the product stays gummy (or at least more flexible).

    I use carnauba wax as a release agent (I purchased it years ago from a shop that made Corvette parts). I apply it just like car wax - it will dry and haze, then I buff it out to a very thin shiny layer. I use a synthetic modeling clay to fill any recesses or voids that could capture the action or create air pockets.

    I bed in one homogenous step, with the pillars (if I use them) fixed and torqued to the action with the same torque settings I intent to use the rifle with. Of course, the pillars have no release agent - while the action and components do. After a full 24 hour cure in at least 70 degree F conditions, I remove the action screws and pop the barreled action out. After the excess is cleaned up, its complete.

    If I glue the barreled action in, I use solvent to thoroughly clean any residual release agent from the bedding and oil from the action, and use Devcon liquid as mentioned to secure them.

    Hope that helps some, all the best to all of you - have a great summer!

    kev

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Branchville, NJ
    Posts
    540
    Just remember that when doing a glue in, all the screw holes and other cavities that are normally filled with modeling clay during a regular bedding job to prevent lock in, will need to be addressed. Otherwise even heating the action wont get it out of the stock.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lower Dakota Territory
    Posts
    2,182
    When forced to do a glue in, my choice is JB Weld original formula. -Al

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brisbane Australia
    Posts
    157
    I know a lot of smiths use plain old 24 Hour Areldite to glue actions in.. It's strong and reasonably runny enough to work well on a pre-bedded stock.. It also breaks down very easily over about 120deg C so is easy to remove..
    The bigger question is why glue it in in the first place? For the life of me i cannot understand why people insist on doing it.. A proper alloy pillar bedding job is 100% just as good if done correctly, and facilitates easy removal of the action for trigger maintenance or re-barreling.

    Cheers
    Lee

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    North Eastern Australia
    Posts
    254
    Quote Originally Posted by Leeroy View Post
    The bigger question is why glue it in in the first place? For the life of me i cannot understand why people insist on doing it.. A proper alloy pillar bedding job is 100% just as good if done correctly, and facilitates easy removal of the action for trigger maintenance or re-barreling.

    Cheers
    Lee
    I have exactly the same question and would like to hear the logic behind this approach to bedding an action?

    * doggie *

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