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Thread: Using a bushing die as a seating die ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    78

    Using a bushing die as a seating die ?

    Has anyone used a Bushing die to seat bullets ?

    For years I've searched for a seating stem, that contacted the bullet close to it's widest point. Not any luck, in finding a stem to go that far down the Ogive.

    Different bullets have different Ogive shapes. A proper bushing size could solve this.

    Solution, at least in theory, is to use a smaller bushing, than the diameter of the bullet in your Bushing die.

    Any thoughts ?

    Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    145

    seater die

    Jim -

    Howdy !

    I like shooting groundhogs w/ Hornady .224" cal 55SX . These have .009" thick jackets. I wanted to be able to seat these w/o putting undue stress on them.
    I had Hornady make me a seating stem specifically configured to accomodate the 55SX. I also had them make me a seater specific to the .224" cal 75"A"-Max, since their ogive was so long that is was contacting the top inside of the stock seater stem before the stem itself would contact the upper bullet' body.

    When using a neck bushing, I am wondering about whether a conventional seater stem ( especially a custom one ) wouldn't make better contact w/ the bullet; and be a little less likely to produce run-out ? Hmmm.......



    With regards,
    357Mag

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    78
    Yes run out would be a concern.

    The thing about using the Bushing die ? The expense is nill, compared to buying custom made stems.

    The bushings would have a large contact area, so i doubt there shouldn't be any distortion.

    Uniformity of seating depth should be the same, even with different Ogive shapes.

    I'm going to play with this a little.

    Just curious if others have tried this simple trick, and what their results were ? ?

    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    145

    seat w/ bushing

    Jim -

    Please let us know how it works out for you ?



    With regards,
    357Mag

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    78
    WOW !!

    I just returned from the cave. Full length sized 5 LC 13 .223 unprimed, once fired brass.

    Pulled out a 204 Neck die. removed the guts. This worked great. No marks were left on the bullets, during the seating process. I turned the seated bullet, so I could see where the bullet contacted the neck inside the 204 sizing die.

    First bullet I seated was a 50gr. Remington HP, with a concave base. . Then seated 4, 53 gr, Hornady HP Mat. with cannelure.

    Not having an accurate dial indicator, I rolled the cases, on a glass surface. ( I used to do this with my Aluminum Arrows, and tips) Anyway, I could see no tip wobble !

    The cannelure , on the 53gr bullets, indicated a very uniform seating depth !

    The beauty of this arrangement, is the 204 Neck die adjustment, will seat , no matter the shape of the bullet to the same depth.

    I hope this is of use to others.

    Guessing the Bench rest crowd will find this

    Jim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    2,397
    Some while back, I seated 210 grainers in a .308 case, albeit with a seriously long throat for my 1000-1200 yard rifle using a Redding competition die - and I buggered the seating plunger. While Redding replaced it & the scratched die body promptly, these days I understand that they recommend against using their dies for long bullets.

    That set me to wondering about a precision alternative that didn't predispose the seating plunger to expand & jam or scratch the die body. I concluded that two dies were needed:

    • One to partially/almost fully seat using technology that did not distort the plunger whilst still supporting the bullet straight
    • A second die with a substantial diameter head that could absorb addressing the bullet ogive close to where it met the parallel body and barely nudged it finally into place.

    I finally decided that it was too much trouble for the effort and in any case it could well distort the bullet profile.

    A lot of my loading issues are resolved with the motto, do nothing.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    78
    John certainly doing nothing has it's merits.

    The bullets I seated with the bushing die, showed no damage to the bullet, and no runout by my viewing.

    This method has satisfied my long search for a tool that contacts the bullet near the widest point. With this, I can seat a variety of bullets and get the same seating depth every time.

    I'll be using this simple solution, and testing it more !

    Thanks !

    Jim

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    628
    I think if you are seating those bullets long or into the rifling,
    concentricity at the tip is a non-issue as the rifling put the bullet where the rifling wants to push it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    78
    Jamming the bullets into the lands is what I want to avoid.

    That is the purpose of using a seating system, that is more consistent with seating depth.

    I use a bullet Comparator to measure seating depth. Factory seat stems, show more variation, in seating depth, than I like.

    A bushing die can be used to at least reduce this amount of error.

    I'm still in the trail stage. So far I like it.

    Jim

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    628
    Well now, you may find that seating to the jam is most accurate.

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