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Thread: The Remington 700 sear (top lever) design

  1. #1
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    Apr 2010
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    Escondido, Ca via Ohio
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    The Remington 700 sear (top lever) design

    This was brought to my attention and know very little about it.

    The top lever on the r700 trigger has the angled abutment that the cocking piece mimics or mirrors. This naturally drives the bolt upward making the body to raceway fit crucial for proper lug alignment. Has anyone tested a 90° abutment on the top lever and cocking piece to try and dissipate the upward drive? I know Anschutz triggers have been fitted to r700s in the past, which utilize the 90° sear and David Tubb is also on the the trigger lines.

    Adam

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Canadian,Tx
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    Adam,
    The T7T trigger comes with an angled sear which fits the Remington style cocking piece.
    It can also be had with a square top sear if you desire to change or modify your current cocking piece.

    DTubb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Kentucky-Home of the Kentucky Wildcats
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    2,008

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by ab_bentley View Post
    This was brought to my attention and know very little about it.

    The top lever on the r700 trigger has the angled abutment that the cocking piece mimics or mirrors. This naturally drives the bolt upward making the body to raceway fit crucial for proper lug alignment. Has anyone tested a 90° abutment on the top lever and cocking piece to try and dissipate the upward drive? I know Anschutz triggers have been fitted to r700s in the past, which utilize the 90° sear and David Tubb is also on the the trigger lines.

    Adam
    You must like opening cans of worms! Lol!
    FWIW, I've never seen a gun fire with the trigger still pushing up on the cocking piece. They usually go bang after the sear lets go of the cocking piece.

    Oh, other than the slight upward pressure of the sping under the sear, that resets it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    460
    yes but go a little past 90*

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    California...unfortunately
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    581
    Quote Originally Posted by ab_bentley View Post
    This was brought to my attention and know very little about it.

    The top lever on the r700 trigger has the angled abutment that the cocking piece mimics or mirrors. This naturally drives the bolt upward making the body to raceway fit crucial for proper lug alignment. Has anyone tested a 90° abutment on the top lever and cocking piece to try and dissipate the upward drive? I know Anschutz triggers have been fitted to r700s in the past, which utilize the 90° sear and David Tubb is also on the the trigger lines.

    Adam
    Adam,

    Stand by...

    Bill Calfee did a bunch of experimenting with 90 degree engaging surfaces on his rimfire rifles for this very reason. IIRC, on the triggers he modified to 90 degree engagement, he had to manually set the trigger with a small rod (I don't remember the action make) through the action or something like that. He was adamant that there was an accuracy improvement in the guns he tested. He wrote about these experiments with the triggers in Precision Shooting about 10-15 years ago.

    Jim Borden invented "Borden Bumps" to combat/minimize the bolt rising in the raceway, yet still retain a smooth cycling bolt. Check out his website...I think it's explained in detail there.


    Justin

  6. #6
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    Apr 2010
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    Escondido, Ca via Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by DTubb View Post
    Adam,
    The T7T trigger comes with an angled sear which fits the Remington style cocking piece.
    It can also be had with a square top sear if you desire to change or modify your current cocking piece.

    DTubb
    David, your Frank interview was what intrigued me. So, to use your T7T, what do I need to do to use the 90° top lever?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Texas Panhandle
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    1,842
    The Kenyon trigger used a squared off cocking piece and trigger sear. If you can find a copy of Stuart Otteson’s booklet “Benchrest Actions and Triggers” there’s photos of the Kenyon trigger in it. Never saw one in person, but always thought the layout of it was pretty ingenious.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Bryant View Post
    The Kenyon trigger used a squared off cocking piece and trigger sear. If you can find a copy of Stuart Otteson’s booklet “Benchrest Actions and Triggers” there’s photos of the Kenyon trigger in it. Never saw one in person, but always thought the layout of it was pretty ingenious.
    Yes, but the sear/cocking piece layout of the Kenyon trigger is very different to that of say the standard Remington 700 trigger and most of the three lever variants of it.

    The pivot pin of the Kenyon sear is BEHIND the upstand or ledge (or whatever one wants to call it) on the sear that engages with the cocking piece. The engagement point is above a line drawn through the pivot pin, parallel to the centreline of the action, so the forward force on the cocking piece imparts a downward turning moment on the sear.

    Compare this to the Remington trigger and similar, which have the sear pivot pin in front of the engagement point. The cocking piece is pushing on the sear face almost directly in line with the pivot pin, and imparting little or no turning moment. I would take a good bet that if the engagement faces of the cocking piece and sear were cut at 90° instead of being angled as from the factory, the cocking piece would be unable to push the sear down and the trigger system would not work at all.

  9. #9
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    Feb 2003
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    Lower Dakota Territory
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    1,593

    Kenyon trigger

    From Otteson's book:


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