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Thread: Easiest way to true bolt face?

  1. #1
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    Easiest way to true bolt face?

    Donít want to spend $80 a piece for specialized tools to true bolt face on my rem 700s. Is there a specific cutter I can use? Can I make one on the lathe, harden it and use it with 240grit paste? Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    Donít want to spend $80 a piece for specialized tools to true bolt face on my rem 700s. Is there a specific cutter I can use? Can I make one on the lathe, harden it and use it with 240grit paste? Thanks
    Keep in mind when you remove metal to true a boltface on an existing assembly you are also changing the headspace.


    .

  3. #3
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    Yes sir. Aware of that thanks

  4. #4
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    If you want to make the fixture for holding the bolt in a lathe to do the work, I have the drawings.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    Donít want to spend $80 a piece for specialized tools to true bolt face on my rem 700s. Is there a specific cutter I can use? Can I make one on the lathe, harden it and use it with 240grit paste? Thanks

    The reason you would true a bolt face is to insure that it is truly square with the bolt body while removing a minimum amount of metal.This calls for single point facing.
    If you have a steady rest for your Lathe, it's really simple to do.

    When I get back to my shop this afternoon, I will take a picture of a simple setup and post it.
    Last edited by jackie schmidt; 07-12-2018 at 12:58 PM.

  6. #6
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    To echo Jackie's point, a steady rest and single-point bit are the best way to face bolts. Here's a somewhat related picture of how we hold bolts to grind them (opening the face for larger rims):



    -Lee
    www.singleactions.com

  7. #7
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    Thanks guys. Any pics are helpful

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    Thanks guys. Any pics are helpful
    I'm not back in town yet.

    But Lee's picture pretty much shows the setup. I do screw a piece of stock with a 1/2 13tpi on the end to screw into the bolt so I have something to chuck on in a four jaw chuck.

  9. #9
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    My only question is what the cutting tool looks like. Thanks again guys.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    My only question is what the cutting tool looks like. Thanks again guys.
    Im not trying to be clever here and say this with respect.

    If you dont know what the appropriate single point tool would look like for this job or you couldn't work out a set-up for machining then are you capable of setting up and doing this work to the level where you really have improved things?

    It would be so easy to make it worse than it might already be...

    Here you go anyway, single point boring/facing tool you can either buy or grind, just make sure you have enough side and face relief and a small nose radius

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Curious; 07-13-2018 at 02:50 AM.

  11. #11
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    Really????

    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    Thanks guys. Any pics are helpful
    A facing is a pretty basic machining 101. U sure you want to try this?

    Pete

  12. #12
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    Tru bolt face and rear of recoil lugs

    I like Jackie's method and do a similar process. My lathe has very little runout in the nose spindle so I make a spud that goes in a 5 C collet and thread the other end 1/2 X 13 leaving a sholder in the middle for the back end of the bolt to snug against. Put the steady rest on so that it is about 1 inch behind the lugs, giving enough room to do the back of the lugs as well as the bolt face. If necessary indicate the forward end of the bolt or if you get lucky put a center in the firing pin hole. If you need to remove the spud be sure and indicate it in before next use.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    My only question is what the cutting tool looks like. Thanks again guys.
    I usually true them with the extractor in place. Just grind a small tool with "hooked shaped" tip that will go behind the extractor.

    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1531528281

    By the way, when I do this, I turn the chuck by hand. No power. You are usually taking off only a few thousandths to smooth the face and get it true.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  14. #14
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    Thanks guys. That is all the info I need. I really appreciate the time taken for the pics. Now to give it a try

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunner223 View Post
    I like Jackie's method and do a similar process. My lathe has very little runout in the nose spindle so I make a spud that goes in a 5 C collet and thread the other end 1/2 X 13 leaving a sholder in the middle for the back end of the bolt to snug against. Put the steady rest on so that it is about 1 inch behind the lugs, giving enough room to do the back of the lugs as well as the bolt face. If necessary indicate the forward end of the bolt or if you get lucky put a center in the firing pin hole. If you need to remove the spud be sure and indicate it in before next use.
    Are you are assuming the threads in the bolt are concentric to the bolt body? My experience has shown otherwise, Jackie's method using the 4-jaw would compensate for that.

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