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Thread: Cold Blue

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Mims, Fla
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    Cold Blue

    Can you cold blue 11L17 steel?
    john
    Mims, Fl.

  2. #2
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    Feb 2003
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    Houston, Texas
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    Since these free machining steels actually have lead suspended into the grain structure without actually being an alloying agent, it might show blotches.

    As with a lot of things, do a test piece and see the results.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    374
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    Since these free machining steels actually have lead suspended into the grain structure without actually being an alloying agent, it might show blotches.

    As with a lot of things, do a test piece and see the results.
    And every piece can come out slightly different since the lead is dispersed.

    It is there to interrupt the structure of the steel and make shorter chips during machining.
    It also acts (slightly) as a lubricant on the cutting edge of the tool being used.

  4. #4
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    washington.........STATE that is.
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    12L14 "LeadLoy" blues just fine

  5. #5
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    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    12L14 "LeadLoy" blues just fine
    The problem of using 'Cold Blue' is mostly how thin the blued layer actually is.
    It wears very easily from the slightest rubbing.

    And while hot bluing is far from anything 'large' in thickness the different chemistry
    produce a blue that lasts far better than the cold chemistry.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    290
    Are we talking about the old type of cold blue or the stuff that is used for touch up today? The old type of cold blue is every bit as durable as hot blue. Also I believe it's worth noting that either type of bluing does not add dimensionally to the surface.

  7. #7
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    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by martin zuck View Post
    Are we talking about the old type of cold blue or the stuff that is used for touch up today? The old type of cold blue is every bit as durable as hot blue. Also I believe it's worth noting that either type of bluing does not add dimensionally to the surface.
    It bonds to what is there and alters the surface material in the metal.

    It sitll has a measurable 'depth' of penetration into the metal but it is not a 'surface' film that would alter dimensions.

  8. #8
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    Dec 2006
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    I have had good luck with glass bead blasting and then imersion dipping the parts. I use Brownell's Oxpho-Blue. Keep a peanut butter bottle on the bench to drop parts in, swish around and remove. Wipe down and oil. I find that the harder the steel, the less it takes cold blue. I have a 30" piece of 1-1/2" PVC pipe with a cap glued on one end and a cleanout plug on the other for doing barrels.
    Last edited by MilGunsmith; 06-11-2018 at 08:28 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    374
    Quote Originally Posted by MilGunsmith View Post
    I have had good luck with glass bead blasting and then imersion dipping the parts. I use Brownell's Oxpho-Blue. Keep a peanut butter bottle on the bench to drop parts in, swish around and remove. Wipe down and oil. I find that the harder the steel, the less it takes cold blue. I have a 30" piece of 1-1/2" PVC pipe with a cap glued on one end and a cleanout plug on the other for doing barrels.
    Before discount $45 a quart.
    OUCH.

    Even with pricey.

  10. #10
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    Dec 2003
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    washington.........STATE that is.
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    IME the single biggest factor when cold bluing is heat. Heat the part up to uncomfortable to hold. Use a heat gun or an oven, not propane.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Branchville, NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by brickeyee View Post
    Before discount $45 a quart.
    OUCH.

    Even with pricey.
    I have been he same gallon bottle for years. I only pour enough to cover the small parts and then swirl bottle. The barrel pipe setup takes about a pint The used blue stays in the parts bottle. I pour off used into another bottle and let it settle, then use it again.

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