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Thread: Thank goodness they don't make them like the used to......

  1. #1
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    Thank goodness they don't make them like the used to......

    Currently rebarreling an old Blued Rem 700 308 Target/Tactical for a client, pulled the factory barrel off & found this....



    When going into the receiver "loose" doesn't even begin to describe the first 3/4's of the thread

    It has been abused & had a besquillion rounds through it.

    Used to shoot fantastically, easily 1/2 moa & better right out there with barely 1/4" of thread holding it into the receiver....

  2. #2
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    I ran into the same thing with an old Remington 721 that I decided to build a custom on because it was born the same year I was.

    I had ways heard stories about how back then the actions were machined much truer than today's offerings. When I set the action up to check it and true it up, it suffered from the same errors as today's. Face way out of square, threads not true with boltway, one lug making contact. The usual.

    It ended up a really nice Rifle. But it opened my eyes and debunked a few old wives tales.

  3. #3
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    Looks like it was done on a plumber's pipe machine. All it needs is a 90 and some pipe dope...

    Justin

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zebra13 View Post
    Looks like it was done on a plumber's pipe machine.
    Thought the same thing.

  5. #5
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    Just for interests sake the serial # is C6708696

    I guess that gives an indication of the year it was built ?

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Unless you machine very special threads only a few threads on any application take almost all the load.

    The example is usually two or three threads on even a precision threaded fastener or joint.

    Remington probably had interference at full barrel seating to discourage user removal of the barrel.

  7. #7
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    Greg, That's some kind of thread. Not sure how you'd ever even cut a thread that looked like that.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Bryant View Post
    Greg, That's some kind of thread. Not sure how you'd ever even cut a thread that looked like that.
    Yes I was very surprised when it was trying to fall out of the action with only just less than 1/2 of the thread engaged....

  9. #9
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    The stories about Remington using Loctite on barrels start to make more sense now...

  10. #10
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    Was built in about 1988. Remingtons are dated by barrel code and not the serial number.

  11. #11
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    Monday morning or Friday afternoon gun, perhaps

    I don't think this was what Henry Ford had in mind as far as Mass Production is concerned.

    Pete

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    I don't think this was what Henry Ford had in mind as far as Mass Production is concerned.

    Pete
    He did the same thing to lock any number of threaded vehicle fittings.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TRX View Post
    The stories about Remington using Loctite on barrels start to make more sense now...
    You don't need Loctite just that 1200lb industrial grade gorilla to tighten em up.
    I would be curious to see how far out the action threads are and if perhaps they have a taper towards the lugs.
    I have seen them all over the map from damn near as square as a custom to so far out you didn't even want to true them up.
    The truth of the matter is the closer your mating surfaces are to square the less important your thread engagement becomes.
    If your mating surfaces aren't square as in most production settings you just keep applying torque until they are, (or the threads fail!)
    Ease of assembly is much more important in a mass production setting then nice fitting threads and square surfaces
    Hence the 1200 lb gorilla
    Greg

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Over the years I have removed a number of barrels from actual military surplus rifles.

    Many of them had been 'GI proofed' by having generous interference threads to prevent any attempt at barrel removal.
    A few had short threads and a collar that crushed threads in the action to lock them together.

    Lots of threads deformed, and more than a few that had to have the barrel actually cut at the receiver and some
    boring done on the inside of the stub to then remove it.

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