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Thread: Annealing made perfect aztec sort

  1. #1
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    Feb 2003
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    Annealing made perfect aztec sort

    Guys this changes everything. This is one of the greatest things ever invented for a competition shooter. This takes us into the 22nd Century. I always thought the machine was something every competition shooter that Anneals should use. This takes it 10 steps forward.
    This is just as important as is a $2000 scope.
    This was the greatest thing at the shot show this year. I called and asked President Trump to put it in his speech...he called this morning and said he had forgotten and he was sorry!

    Annealing made perfect

  2. #2
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    Feb 2003
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    I can't believe I haven't got one of these yet.

    I'm ordering one tomorrow.

  3. #3
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    Hey Lou.

    Which pilot # did you order to hold a 6PPC?

    Thanks

  4. #4
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    Three questions on the AMP: (quick edit - I added a third)

    1) Is anyone using them in short-range BR? I understand the benefit at 600 & 1000 yards
    2) How often are you annealing the necks after fire-forming?
    3) Has performance improved?

    -Lee
    www.singleactions.com
    Last edited by Lee Martin; 02-01-2018 at 03:35 PM.

  5. #5
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    Oct 2013
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    New Vineyard, Maine via Milford, Massachusetts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Martin View Post
    Three questions on the AMP: (quick edit - I added a third)

    1) Is anyone using them in short-range BR? I understand the benefit at 600 & 1000 yards
    2) How often are you annealing the necks after fire-forming?
    3) Has performance improved?

    -Lee
    www.singleactions.com
    Lee. I have been using one for about 2 years now. I shoot SR score. I anneal every-3-4 firings even thought the people at AMP suggest that you do it after every firing. The thing that I have noticed is that when I seat bullets, they are more uniform as far as seating pressure goes. I have a gauge to measure seating force. As far as performance improvement, there are too many variables in this sport to say that using a AMP vs a BS annealer will improve your scores. I've been shooting now for 5 seasons and every season I have been shooting better. I can't say that it's attributed to any one thing. I've bought so many of the latest greatest gadgets that there is no way of knowing for sure what is working or not. Bottom line Lee, if you can afford one buy it. I wouldn't care if the thing cost 5 grand I'd buy one. It's more precise than any torch, it's easier to set-up and use. It's way safer, it's just a better mousetrap.
    Last edited by Jim Pag; 02-01-2018 at 05:00 PM.

  6. #6
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    Feb 2003
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    CA
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    308

    Asked and answered

    Hi Lawrence,

    Thanks for your email. Have you checked our Settings page https://www.ampannealing.com/settings/ ? All the data you need is there. You will need pilot #01 for your PPC.

    Regards

    Alex Findlay President AMP Annealing

  7. #7
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    Talking

    Many thanks Jim. That was the sort of feedback I was after. I'll likely buy one once I talk to them about a custom pilot (my score gun is a 30 caliber wildcat).

    -Lee
    www.singleactions.com
    Last edited by Lee Martin; 02-01-2018 at 05:45 PM.

  8. #8
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    Lee

    Check out their pilot sizing chart at https://www.ampannealing.com/settings/

    They literally have hundreds of cartridges listed and you can probably find your parent cartridge there.

  9. #9
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    I referenced their chart and was impressed. My .30 Stingray is a 40 degree .30 Major with the shoulder pushed ahead 35-thou. I wrote AMP to see what they recommend for the pilot.

    -Lee
    www.singleactions.com

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Martin View Post
    I referenced their chart and was impressed. My .30 Stingray is a 40 degree .30 Major with the shoulder pushed ahead 35-thou. I wrote AMP to see what they recommend for the pilot.

    -Lee
    www.singleactions.com
    Lee. I sometimes shoot a cartridge called the 30 Gorilla. It's Larry Feusse's pet project. It's a 30 Major with a 35 degree shoulder. Also this year I'm shooting a new cartridge called the 30 Thrasher. It was Smokin Joe Entrekin's pet project maybe 18 years ago. I purchased the whole works from him, barrel, cases, reamer, all sorts of dies ect. It's a lengthened 30BR case with a 40 degree shoulder. You neck it up and trim the case to OAL, then FF it of the case mouth like a rimless pistol cartridge. The cases come out pretty slick.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    758

    Been using mine for 2 years

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Martin View Post
    Three questions on the AMP: (quick edit - I added a third)

    1) Is anyone using them in short-range BR? I understand the benefit at 600 & 1000 yards
    2) How often are you annealing the necks after fire-forming?
    3) Has performance improved?

    -Lee
    www.singleactions.com
    Been using mine for 2 years for short range BR as well as my hunting calibres. I anneal each time I fire the brass except for the cases I load at the range. Has performance improved ? I haven't and that's the main issue. But I have had to toss less brass. If the primer pockets stay firm they just keep going.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Pag View Post
    Lee. I sometimes shoot a cartridge called the 30 Gorilla. It's Larry Feusse's pet project. It's a 30 Major with a 35 degree shoulder. Also this year I'm shooting a new cartridge called the 30 Thrasher. It was Smokin Joe Entrekin's pet project maybe 18 years ago. I purchased the whole works from him, barrel, cases, reamer, all sorts of dies ect. It's a lengthened 30BR case with a 40 degree shoulder. You neck it up and trim the case to OAL, then FF it of the case mouth like a rimless pistol cartridge. The cases come out pretty slick.
    I considered doing the Gorilla. Then I remembered Larry wrote about getting a hair more powder in with the sharper shoulder. I just went up another 5 degrees and pushed it forward 0.035". These aren't big changes, but they get me real close to 30 BR capacity.

    BTW, I sent Alex at AMP my chamber print. He wrote back and said a #33 pilot would be perfect for my Stingray. A #33 is for the 7.62x39. Different shoulder angle and body taper than my .30, but he claims it'll work.

    -Lee
    www.singleactions.com

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    110
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Martin View Post
    Three questions on the AMP: (quick edit - I added a third)

    1) Is anyone using them in short-range BR? I understand the benefit at 600 & 1000 yards
    2) How often are you annealing the necks after fire-forming?
    3) Has performance improved?

    -Lee
    www.singleactions.com
    Lee,

    Here is a post I made concerning the AMP a while back on another website. The thread was asking questions a little different than yours but I think that what I have found will help you out:

    "I keep my brass in lots for each rifle, for example my heavy gun has 195 pieces of brass in the lot. All same lot# from Lapua, all made at the same, same neck turner setting, same amount of firings (within 1), etc. Basically as identical as possible.

    Before I got an AMP I would usually see three distinct groups of seating force with this brass. Each piece of brass within a group was within 5 inch pounds of the rest, with three total 5 in/lb groups. About 5% of those 195 pieces usually fell outside of that range and were used as foulers.

    I now anneal after every firing.

    Clean necks > anneal > size

    I am seating using the K&M Arbor Press with Force Pack, which allows me to see what my seating pressure is.

    After the first time annealing with the AMP all 195 pieces were within 5 in/lb of each other.

    After the second time they were all within 2 in/lb of each other.

    The 2 in/lb has remained constant so far. "

    Hope this helps!

    On a purely personal and probably pointless note, the AMP is an absolute pleasure to use. I am usually grinning like a kid on Christmas when using my AMP.
    Last edited by josh shrum; 02-02-2018 at 08:41 AM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Southwest PA
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    76

    So...

    To piggyback off of Lee...are any of you SR group competitors annealing? If so, is it helping or are you shooting the same as always?

    The technology is very cool, but I'm wondering where something like this falls in the order of importance as far as equipment goes for the SR group crowd. Lot's of ways to spend $1000 plus.

  15. #15
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    Sep 2005
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmymac View Post
    To piggyback off of Lee...are any of you SR group competitors annealing? If so, is it helping or are you shooting the same as always?

    The technology is very cool, but I'm wondering where something like this falls in the order of importance as far as equipment goes for the SR group crowd. Lot's of ways to spend $1000 plus.
    If you do a bit of math, and depending on how many cases you prep for a barrel, you would be able to determine the number of firings on each case (approx) you would accumulate during a match.

    So to make it easy 20 cases and fire approx 200 - 250 rounds at a match (tune, practice, LV & HV) then each case would be fired 10+ times.

    I've never found enough time to anneal my brass during a match, but if you have power at the range you could anneal at the end of each day but given that some of the brass is bin material after a LV/HV match because of primer pocket issues, I think the US$1099 price tag would buy a lot of brass.

    I can certainly understand the need for annealing for long distance competition, but the question I've got is does it matter if each case is annealed to what someone says is the perfect specification or that each case is annealed consistantly the same as each other case no matter which way this is achieved.

    Ian

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