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Thread: Barrel block location

  1. #16
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    Feb 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by ELR Researcher View Post
    Assuming that the barrel block is positioned directly in front of the action, are there any well established guidelines for the length of the barrel block, how much materials there should be around the barrel (the minimum thickness of the barrel block), and the weight of the barreled action?
    My barrel block is 6 inches long with 4 bolts per side and is 3.5 in. wide by 3 in. tall. It looks like the Young block is a little bigger than that, and is about 8 inches long with 5 bolts per side.
    I would think a typical barreled action with 1.450 diameter barrel would weigh in the vicinity of 12 lbs. depending on barrel length and action being used.
    Gene

  2. #17
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    Dec 2013
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    79
    Has anyone tried running a Mann Accuracy device style V-bed?

    Also, with the blockless Stolle rail mentioned earlier, any idea why it shot so good/how vibration was eliminated? Seeing as you couldn't get that style rail to work with your BAT M?

    Would yall say theres much difference in the rails used in BR compared to the rails used in ammo/bullet testing, etc? Ie I aint never seen something like a Wiseman rail used in benchrest..

  3. #18
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    We shoot the Mann V-block for ammo testing at work. We are experimenting with other designs also, like Thompson bearing slides, and barrel blocks or action blocks. Nothing seems to be the perfect solution yet. We shoot .223 up to .338 Norma Mag. Each caliber has its preference.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbhotrod View Post
    Has anyone tried running a Mann Accuracy device style V-bed?

    Also, with the blockless Stolle rail mentioned earlier, any idea why it shot so good/how vibration was eliminated? Seeing as you couldn't get that style rail to work with your BAT M?

    Would yall say theres much difference in the rails used in BR compared to the rails used in ammo/bullet testing, etc? Ie I aint never seen something like a Wiseman rail used in benchrest..
    There are several requirements of a good Rail Gun that is used in Benchrest Competition.

    The first is to have true return to battery capabilities. That means a shooter can, by all expectations, shoot a group without ever looking through the scope and be confident that every shot will go into the group.

    The second is easily accessed controles that do allow for quick adjustments in he point of aim if the need arises.

    A foolproof sighter system that allows you to go to the sighter quickly and return to the record quickly.

    Ease of setting up on the bench in the event of multi relay matches.

    Any idea that meets these basic requirements will work.

  5. #20
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    Feb 2003
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    Tennessee
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    5,171

    That's it....!

    Jackie described a good rail gun....one that won't move and can be shot quickly...win or lose.

  6. #21
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    Sep 2005
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    I've seen a few photos of rail guns where the action was mounted in the block and not the barrel

    The first one pictured belonged to Frank Murphy, and the second and third look like they were made by Jay Young, the fourth one was built by Mike Bryant and the third & sixth one look like long Stolle actions bolted to the top.

    I assume these shot pretty well, or did they? The reason I ask is because I still see more barrel block rails compared to action block rails.
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    Last edited by Ian_Owen; 12-24-2017 at 11:06 PM.

  7. #22
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    Oct 2003
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    Chehalis, WA.
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    Ian.

    I think the one third from the left is a Hasecuster, less a barrel block, with a Stolle Polar action.

    The reason I think this, is the rest is a dead ringer for the Hasecuster I shoot.

    FWIW

    Steve Kostanich

  8. #23
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    Oct 2003
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    Chehalis, WA.
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    Correction,

    I think that is a Teddy not a Polar action by Stolle in the 3rd photo.

    Steve K.

  9. #24
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    Sep 2003
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    Oriental, NC
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    Jackie,

    Ever consider what I call a front sleeve. I epoxy a ring on the front of the receiver that doesn't extend beyond the face of the action. After the epoxy has cured mount the action on a mandrel. Turn the ring down leaving a small shoulder on the rear. Make up a sleeve for lack of a better description. Then epoxy the action with ring into the forward facing sleeve. I have an Xp-100 in a steel sleeve that still shots very well. Make the dimensions work so your max diameter will work.
    No need to completely sleeve the action.
    Last edited by Dave Tooley; 12-30-2017 at 07:05 PM.

  10. #25
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    Jun 2006
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    Idaho
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    Dave, a picture of your partial ring thing would help. Sounds interesting.

  11. #26
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    I'll try and get a picture up. If you look at the last set of pics in this thread some of the actions were sleeved then put in blocks. The full length sleeve is unnecessary and a lot of work. You just need a ring on the front of the action. I turned the ring down to size for the bore in the block, leaving a small shoulder on the rear towards the loading port. When I glued the prepared action-ring combo into the block I would set it up vertically and let gravity square everything up. The block could be a basic ?X4?X whatever in length. I use steel for the ring on the action and aluminum for the block on several I've built. If you built and tested a hundred of these a steel block might prove to be better and could be made smaller than one made of aluminum. I've built several test rigs for 338 caliber rifles and there's one thing I've learned. It takes mass to manage violence. Even with the PPC case mass matters.

  12. #27
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    Jun 2006
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    Idaho
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Tooley View Post
    You just need a ring on the front of the action.
    OK, that makes more sense. But if you are going to glue the action into a block anyway, what is the advantage of the ring or a sleeve? Doesn't the block act as a sleeve?

  13. #28
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    Sep 2003
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    Oriental, NC
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    You could and I have taken a Remington action and turned down the front of the receiver to get the shoulder to use for alignment purposes. This was started back in the 70's using Remington actions. For all you old timers Nick Young had two UL built and even a HV with a front sleeve. Also it's much easier to to bore/ream a through hole rather than a two diameter hole of any length. I don't think you give up anything using the ring .

  14. #29
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    Dec 2013
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    79
    Anybody got a pic of the rail Sierra uses to test their bullets? And do yall think it would be competitive in BR? Just curious

  15. #30
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    Sep 2003
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    Oriental, NC
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    I've been in Sierra and Hornady's tunnels. One has a large heavy fixtures running on linear bearings. Ferris Pindell built Sierra's. It has a block on top that's hinged on one side and T-handle clamping screws on the other. Kinda like a hatch cover on a ship. 1.250" barrels are the norm. Also consider they are not looking for BR accuracy. Sub whatever the spec is and keep the presses running. Both grind through a lot of bullets everyday doing QC. If you're passing by on a hunting trip stop by for a tour. It can be enlightening in many ways. It always best to call ahead. I need to get back out to Hornady. They've expanded three times since I was last there.

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