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Thread: Shipyard stories

  1. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    Tim

    Pen stripper is code for pin stripper......I thought you knew that.
    Hear of pin striping for cars.....
    Never heard of pen/pin stripper.

    The last place I worked. Everything was called by the name on the box/item. Guy called a hammer drill, Hilde. We didn't have a Hilde.
    The hammer drill was a Milwaukee....
    Maybe, there needs to be more clarification. Most of the names used. Were the first name that person read or heard....So there were 10 names for a fork lift...depending on who you are talking too.
    Like there were 6 different weather reports. Depending on who you were talking to.
    In San Diego. We didn't talk about weather or the Padres or Chargers.......

  2. #137
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    Mort.
    What's the first thing done, when a ship is in drydock? Pier services are rendered......

  3. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    I got it and I really like your drill press setup.You are definitely a no frills kind of guy....and it works.

    Pouring the chocks looks like a mess waiting to happen.

    Could you send a pic of the finished installation on the one in the previous pictures?

    Mort
    I'm in Orange this morning, here is what the Foundation Foot looks like after the Chockfast is poured and has hardened.

    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1515781830

    It's not really that messy. The worst thing that can happen is to spring a leak, but even at that, you just cram a little duct seal into the spot.

    As you see, you want a good riser above the Gear Foot so you can be assured of a 100 percent pour.
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    Last edited by jackie schmidt; 01-12-2018 at 02:33 PM.

  4. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    The worst thing that can happen is to spring a leak, but even at that, you just cram a little duct seal into the spot.
    duct seal? Is that the same as monkey sh*t??? Don't confuse that with a 3rd world country....PLS....Or even 2nd...EH!

  5. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    I have spent my life in Shipyards, since we are a full service Machine Shop for the Marine Industry.

    When vessels are on drydock, or even at dockside for repairs, it can get very cramped very quickly due to the large amount of persons having to work in a very limited space. This limited space is usually filled with the various large components that make the vessel work.

    On any job, a good Project Coordinator is essential to see the people are not stumbling over one another in an attempted to get something done. It might be something as simple as realizing you can't be sand blasting while engines are being rebuilt, or something as complicated as ensuring all of the running gear is Machined correctly BEFORE it is installed.

    If you like rigging, here is a picture of a 86 ft Pushboat Hull being lifted and placed in the water by "Big John", a 600 ton floating crane that works the Ship Channel in Houston.

    The Shipyard constructs the hull upside down, then flips it and places it in the water. It can then be placed on a drydock for finishing.

    The blank hull weighs about 200 tons.
    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1505664129
    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1505664129
    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1505666409
    Got to see Herman the German crane at LBNY. 1982. Wow. Was it big.....
    Wiki does not jive with my memory....eh.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herman...(crane_vessel)

  6. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by zippy06 View Post
    Hear of pin striping for cars.....
    Never heard of pen/pin stripper.

    The last place I worked. Everything was called by the name on the box/item. Guy called a hammer drill, Hilde. We didn't have a Hilde.
    The hammer drill was a Milwaukee....
    Maybe, there needs to be more clarification. Most of the names used. Were the first name that person read or heard....So there were 10 names for a fork lift...depending on who you are talking too.
    Like there were 6 different weather reports. Depending on who you were talking to.
    In San Diego. We didn't talk about weather or the Padres or Chargers.......
    Tim
    My PC would not accept the plural of striper with a pen or pin as a prefix.

    I just knew the Benchrest folks and you would cut me a little slack....everyone knows what I meant....right?

    Even though I like to B.S. your reading the best effort of someone who got a "D" in English...absolute truth.

    My English teacher was single, young and a real fox. Between thinking about her and my 47 Ford there wasn't room for anything else.

    Mort

    PS: The "D" was a gift

  7. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by zippy06 View Post
    Mort.
    What's the first thing done, when a ship is in drydock? Pier services are rendered......
    For anyone working on the ship who had to take a crap...you can't use the head in dry dock . The sand blasters would chase you down.

    Mort

    PS: Did I pass the quiz?

  8. #143
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    Reduction Gears

    Jackie

    It looks better than I thought it would . Someone took a little care with the pour.

    Is the riser going to stay?

    I have never seen the reduction gears on a Navy ship. I was told the hatch is always locked for security reasons.

    Thanks for the pic.

  9. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    Jackie

    It looks better than I thought it would . Someone took a little care with the pour.

    Is the riser going to stay?

    I have never seen the reduction gears on a Navy ship. I was told the hatch is always locked for security reasons.

    Thanks for the pic.
    Reduction gears on large steam and gas turbine powered vessels are very expensive and extremely precision pieces of equipment. They have to reduce RPM's of a 4000 RPM turbine down to around 200 turns for the prop shaft. Most are double reduction, and have two inputs, or pinions. One off of the high pressure turbine, one off of the low pressure.

    Here is a view of a typical Turbine System from a WW-2 Destroyer. It's probably a 30,000 unit. You can see the high and low pressure turbines and the double reduction.

    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1515888444

    From what I know, the Navy, and even some commercial interest, never owned the turbine/reduction gear sets. They rented them from GE.

    One good thing about these huge pieces of equipment. They were just about good for the life of the ship.
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    Last edited by jackie schmidt; 01-13-2018 at 08:19 PM.

  10. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    Jackie

    It looks better than I thought it would . Someone took a little care with the pour.

    Is the riser going to stay?.
    The shipyard will remove the dams, jacking screws, and duct seal, and with a disc sander, trim the rough edges off the riser and make it look good.

    This boat is due for completion and delivery in March.

  11. #146
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    Back in Hong Kong

    Tim

    You mentioned the long enlistment for the Royal Navy. The British Marines had x number of years for their basic enlistment and then did two more for the Queen.

    Anytime the Queen was mentioned in a sentence, the Brits would propose a toast "To the Queen". The proper response :to the Queen"...chug a lug and so it went.

    One of the tricks to keep the room from spinning was to put one foot on the floor/deck. It really worked. I was four bunks up so that wasn't going to happen, and it wasn't good etiquette to barf over the edge of your rack. I managed to man up and keep it together...didn't puke until after morning chow.

    Life is good

    Mort
    Last edited by dmort; 01-13-2018 at 09:35 PM.

  12. #147
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    zippy06, what years were you on the Gridley? I used to drop my buddy Mike Gorchinski off at the Gridley every morning, on my way to NAS North Island!

  13. #148
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    Steelhead

    Will be at the Griddle on Caldwell this friday around noon.

    White hair and beard wearing a Boise State blue ball cap.

    PM me if you can't make it.

    Mort

  14. #149
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    I will be there, see you then.

  15. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    Reduction gears on large steam and gas turbine powered vessels are very expensive and extremely precision pieces of equipment. They have to reduce RPM's of a 4000 RPM turbine down to around 200 turns for the prop shaft. Most are double reduction, and have two inputs, or pinions. One off of the high pressure turbine, one off of the low pressure.

    Here is a view of a typical Turbine System from a WW-2 Destroyer. It's probably a 30,000 unit. You can see the high and low pressure turbines and the double reduction.

    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1515888444

    From what I know, the Navy, and even some commercial interest, never owned the turbine/reduction gear sets. They rented them from GE.

    One good thing about these huge pieces of equipment. They were just about good for the life of the ship.
    Jackie

    The reduction gear picture showed a jacking gear adjacent to the main shaft.

    To my knowledge it was used just for checking maintenance needs or whatever....like using a 12 volt bump starter on your hot rod V8.

    Again thanks for the pics....you keep my brain working.

    Mort
    Last edited by dmort; 01-15-2018 at 07:03 PM.

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