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Thread: Ultimate FTR Rig

  1. #1
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    Ultimate FTR Rig

    If you were to build the ultimate FTR rig how would go by doing it?

    Reamer design, FB for 185 or 200 Berger, neck dimension
    Barrel brand
    Stock brand
    Action brand, RBRP, RBLP?
    Scope brand, power, clicks, reticle
    Scope rings
    Bipod brand
    Gunsmith - metal work
    Stock work

    Thank you

  2. #2
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    Bat mb action on a pr&t ftr stock with a brux barrel. NF comp scope, they make ftr specific reamers for each bullet youd use.

  3. #3
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    There are lots of answers but one valid one is a box-stock Savage 12 F/TR 308 for about twelve hundred bucks along with 100 hours of individualized coaching by a wind reading expert.

  4. #4
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    Building a successful FTR rig is all about weight-saving.

    The barrel is the starting point - heavy profile - 1.25 to 1 inch at the muzzle - 30 inches long at least. Yes, the heavy bullets are taking over, so think c. 200gn.

    Action - the BAT M is a great action but it's a pound heavier than the Stolle F Class action - which also has a built-in rail with taper. Easy way to save weight. Use Stolle rings as well - very light.

    Scope? Needs to be of at least 32 power and light. The March 10 - 60 is 25oz and perfect. If it's too expensive, go for the 8-32 Sightron with LRMOA ret. or maybe the new 15-60 Vortex - bit heavier but cheaper than the March.

    Stock - it should be long - 39 inches - the Precision Rifle & Tool stock is perfect (see Bob Ballard's Gun of the Week no.88 on 6mmBR.com) Forget adjustable butt and cheek-piece - you don't need 'em and you can't afford the weight but the beavertail fore-end is great for load-testing on the bench.

    Bi-pod? Needs to be light, around a pound - SEB Joypod if you can afford it - Mystic Precision if you can't.

    VinceB (UK)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mozella View Post
    along with 100 hours of individualized coaching by a wind reading expert.
    Funny how he uses his actual name and folks still dont recognize him. People go to nez for coaching. I doubt if he'd need any.

  6. #6
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    Thank you all for the responses. Dusty, thank you for the vote of confidence.

    The reason for all these questions, though I enjoy shooting my service rifle across the mid and long range courses, due to the shoulder injuries my sling shooting days may be numbered. I will miss shooting irons at 1000 yards though.

    Dusty, I heard through the grapevine that you an M14 guy at heart, here is one for your laughs and giggles


    http://youtu.be/rKqFfhF1sX4

  7. #7
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    Guys, Nez is a Service Rifle sling shooter. He has attained High Master status. He can read the wind!! Nez, you know how well the March scopes work. I notice that Doc Beech showed a new reticle they have available. I would favor the receivers from Kelblys.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butch Lambert View Post
    Guys, Nez is a Service Rifle sling shooter. He has attained High Master status. He can read the wind!! Nez, you know how well the March scopes work. I notice that Doc Beech showed a new reticle they have available. I would favor the receivers from Kelblys.
    No doubt Nez will have a very short learning curve... but I've shot with a few well-known high-level sling shooters (both Service and Palma) in my time, and every single one that tried F-class found they had to read the wind a lot tighter than they had before. A few considered it good 'wind-training' for exactly that reason. Needless to say, they came up to speed pretty quickly, as they already had a solid foundation to build on.

  9. #9
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    He cant be lazy thats for sure. Isnt the x and 10 quite a bit smaller than service rifle in f class?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Stevens View Post
    He cant be lazy thats for sure. Isnt the x and 10 quite a bit smaller than service rifle in f class?
    The X-ring on the sling target becomes the 10 ring on the F-class target, and the new X-ring is 1/2 the diameter (only 1/4 the area!).

    Shooting sling is definitely more physically demanding - training one's self to be that still while strapped into a heavy coat and slung up is harder than it looks, and Service Rifle, with the one-size-fits-all stock and relatively short sight radius doesn't make it any easier. But when there is just a fuzz over 1/4 moa difference between an X and a 9... F-class isn't as forgiving as one might think. When the mirage comes up, and you can no longer see anything inside the 9 ring - its all a big fuzzy grey mess - a lot of the 'benefit' of shooting scoped starts to fade!

  11. #11
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    We'll see how he does. With a good setup and his experience ill put nez up against any of the "ftr heroes". Hes not getting into this because he failed at his other game. This is gonna be like putting an outback surgeon in the best equipped OR.

  12. #12
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    Odds are good; I've seen it before

  13. #13
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    After reading this thread, I did a search on this class, and found some of the results rather amusing.

    Most amusing was the requirement that you must shoot off of a bi-pod, rather than a fancy front test. But then someone is actually manufacturing a joystick front by-pod. Sort of defeats the spirit of the class.

    It's turned into a equipment face, just like everything else. That being said, I have seen the out of the box Savage FTR in 308 shoot pretty consistent "three's" and clean 20x's in VFS.
    Last edited by jackie schmidt; 05-08-2016 at 02:18 PM.

  14. #14
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    The only handicaps left are the cartridges and nez has that down too.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    After reading this thread, I did a search on this class, and found some of the results rather amusing.

    Most amusing was the requirement that you must shoot off of a bi-pod, rather than a fancy front test. But then someone is actually manufacturing a joystick front by-pod. Sort of defeats the spirit of the class.
    As compared to the arbitrary rules for say, so-called "Hunter" Benchrest, with a maximum of 6x scopes, or the single-shot actions with filler blocks? Or some of the tricked-out Service Rifle AR-15s, with free-float handguards, lead weights in every available free space, pinned rear sights, match triggers...oh, and 1907-style slings that were never issued with any black rifle ever...?

    Pretty much every competitive discipline evolves it's own set of rules and standards that from the outside may appear a bit odd.

    A joystick bipod is one possible solution; it comes with its own set of issues that have to be dealt with in turn.
    Last edited by milanuk; 05-08-2016 at 05:33 PM.

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