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Thread: Hey Dusty, put this on that Big 300 Merc

  1. #1
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    Hey Dusty, put this on that Big 300 Merc

    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1455821230

    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1455821388

    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1455821670
    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1455822174

    We hand fit the tapers on these big props after the wheels shops get through repairing them. The Shaft, which we rebuilt, is 13 inch diameter, 31 ft long.
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    Last edited by jackie schmidt; 02-18-2016 at 02:03 PM.

  2. #2
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    San Angelo, Texas (West Texas)
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    Wow!

    Jackie,

    What kind of boat does that thing fit?

    What is the purpose of the ripples on the blades?

  3. #3
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    The wheel fits A big single screw Harbor Tug. It's a shade under 12 ft in diameter, is turned by a 4000 HP EMD Diesel.

    The ripples just appear that way. The Wheel Shops polish the blades with big rotary sanders that leave that finish. You really can't feel them.

    The blad s are squared off on the tips because it runs inside a big Kort Nozzle.

    G&H Towing is who owns it. The have the contract for handling ships in the Houston/Galveston ship channels. We do all of their propellor shaft and rudder work.
    Last edited by jackie schmidt; 02-18-2016 at 07:17 PM.

  4. #4
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    Malvern, Arkansas
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    Hey i got a large collection of handmade wheels- i even have a miniature version that looks just like that i had on a mastercraft. That would look cool on there tho.

  5. #5
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    Jackie
    I really like those shop photos. It reminded me of some of the stuff I got to work on. The shop I worked in was run by the Navy so some of the things that came in were pretty big. Railroad tracts came into one end of the building and they would bring the big stuff in on a flatcar. The two largest pieces that came in while I worked there was a rudder and the rudder shaft or prop shaft. Whatever the shaft was it was a large. Anyway, they were off the aircraft carrier Midway. The rudder was setup in front of the biggest floor mill we had in the shop. The day shift did all the work and all I had to do was make some chips. The tool and die shop made a simple but really neat fixture for cutting the taper. Each pass took awhile and I could peek into the top drawer of my roll around and check out Guns And Ammo or Hot Rod magazine.
    Sometimes you get the gravy and sometimes you have to do the setup. the shaft came in on in the swing shift and it was my job to put it in the longest lathe in the shop. I ran around with a rag tape making chalk marks just off the ways so the riggers could lift and position the steady rests and so it went. When you have one or two riggers and the crane operator waiting on you to move the job along you have to get with the program.
    The Navy was big on recording jobs with photos for future reference, and if you worked the job you could have copies. I have tried to post them but the clarity is really bad. They are 8 by 10 and really clear so I'm doing something wrong. Will try again later.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    Jackie
    I really like those shop photos. It reminded me of some of the stuff I got to work on. The shop I worked in was run by the Navy so some of the things that came in were pretty big. Railroad tracts came into one end of the building and they would bring the big stuff in on a flatcar. The two largest pieces that came in while I worked there was a rudder and the rudder shaft or prop shaft. Whatever the shaft was it was a large. Anyway, they were off the aircraft carrier Midway. The rudder was setup in front of the biggest floor mill we had in the shop. The day shift did all the work and all I had to do was make some chips. The tool and die shop made a simple but really neat fixture for cutting the taper. Each pass took awhile and I could peek into the top drawer of my roll around and check out Guns And Ammo or Hot Rod magazine.
    Sometimes you get the gravy and sometimes you have to do the setup. the shaft came in on in the swing shift and it was my job to put it in the longest lathe in the shop. I ran around with a rag tape making chalk marks just off the ways so the riggers could lift and position the steady rests and so it went. When you have one or two riggers and the crane operator waiting on you to move the job along you have to get with the program.
    The Navy was big on recording jobs with photos for future reference, and if you worked the job you could have copies. I have tried to post them but the clarity is really bad. They are 8 by 10 and really clear so I'm doing something wrong. Will try again later.
    Here is a picture of that 13 inch shaft in our big LeBlond NR getting ready to prep it for rebuild, This is one of our older machines, but it is a fine old machine.

    A number of years ago, we won the bid to machine eight 24 inch diameter 18 ft long Shafts for four 25,000 HP Seagoing Notch Tugs. The shafts had a 36" diameter flange forged on. The raw forging weighed around 26,000 lbs. That old NR did a great job on them.

    The 1st picture is a 9 inch shaft in our 32 ft Lehmann Lathe. That Shafts of this size are our bread and butter.


    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1457491034

    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1457491170
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    Last edited by jackie schmidt; 03-08-2016 at 09:41 PM.

  7. #7
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    Ive seen some big machines being around turbine generators for power plants. I seen one lathe that had a seat on it to ride. It took into account the sag of the shaft as it went along and pulled off blue chips as big as my arm. Ive also seen a mill lathe type machine that turned the floor mounted chuck and the shaft ran down into the basement and up towatd the roof. Ive also seen drill bits that drill square, triangle or hex holes. I love seeing the out of the ordinary stuff.

  8. #8
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    I once had a catalog of the 1932 British machine exposition that had a couple of engravings of those lathes, Dusty. Also an interesting lathe that trued both wheels of a steam engine at the same time on the axle. Some of the designs didn't seem to offer much concern for the well being of the operators.

  9. #9
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    Nampa Idaho
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    Jackie,Thanks for the photos. Love this stuff. Is that two carriages on the LeBlond? What does NR stand for?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    Jackie,Thanks for the photos. Love this stuff. Is that two carriages on the LeBlond? What does NR stand for?
    Yes. Dual carriages are almost a nessessity in our line of work. Our 32 ft Lehman and our 28 ft Lebland also have duel carriages.

    Our new 28 ft Kingston is only single, but we make do. I enclosed a picture.

    http://benchrest.com/attachment.php?...1&d=1457568283

    As for NR, I really don't know what it stands for. Those big lathes were made from the beginning of WW-2 through the '60's. Our's came out of government storage, it was built in the mid '50's.

    One problem we had with it after several years of service was the Head Bearing. Our top machinist, who ran it quite a bit, started complaining that he could not get any true spots for steady rest, and the lathe was leaving a district "pattern" on long shafts.

    The problem was the main splindle head bearing. It had developed track marks on the race and the chuck side rollers. We called LeBland, and they had the bearing assembly.

    $28,000 dollars. But that included there mechanic flying down to install it. Not a bad deal, really.

    Since then, no trouble.

    We did convert it to a frequency drive for starting and stopping. The original resistor bank/dash pot system was just worn out, and parts were non existent. We had a local Electric Motor Shop design a Frequency Control to stop and start the 75 HP motor. It sounds like a jet irliner taking off when you hit the start button.
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    Last edited by jackie schmidt; 03-09-2016 at 07:22 PM.

  11. #11
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    Frisco, TX
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    And Jackie's Monarch EE lathe is in the same room. He turns case necks on this machine.......

  12. #12
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    Jackie could turn necks on that big machine tho

  13. #13
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    Beside having a real talent he is willing to share what he knows.

  14. #14
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    Shop Photos

    Going into town next week and will get those photos put on a thumb drive.

  15. #15
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    The Rudder

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    Photo #1 is the fixture for boring tapers that the tool and die shop made. It's simple but really neat. A lot of craftsmanship here. Check out the hand welds on the two base pieces. Photos #2 & #3 show the Morton floor mill. These photos were taken from the lift that was used to transfer material to be machined anywhere in the shop. The lathe I put the rudder shaft in isn't shown but is to the right of the planer table.

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