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Thread: Turbo Bolts!

  1. #1
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    Sep 2008
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    Red face Turbo Bolts!

    At the 50/50 Nationals I shared a bench with gunsmith Alan Hall. Both my sporter and heavy gun are built by Turbo and smithed by Eck. I've had a lot of trouble with the sporter bolt, replaced the spring, still had misfires, etc. Alan showed me his new designed firing pin and spring for the Turbo and explained that it was 1/3 the weight of the original Turbo firing pin, and this results in a much faster lock time. In addition, the spring has much less spring tension since it is much lighter and faster. This results in less vibration following the shot, as the lighter pin and spring doesn't disturb the rifle as much.

    Anyway, I sent my sporter bolt home with Alan to install his new designed pin, and was surprised that I had it back within a week! I took it to the range for some testing and noticed right away that the bolt closed much easier and smoother, without the tension I was used to when closing the bolt. The rifle functioned fine and I won the sporter match at Gateway the following Saturday with a 248-15x in some switchy conditions. http://benchrest.com/images/icons/icon11.png

    Gordon just delivered my Turbo heavy gun a year ago and it shoots better than I can. However, the one complaint I had was the "stiffness" when closing the bolt. I had to be careful not to upset the rifle in the bags when I closed it. After my pleasant change in closing the bolt on my sporter, I talked with Alan again and he assured me the much less tension on the spring with his design is what makes the bolt close so much easier. Ok, I sent him my heavy gun bolt and again had it back within a week. I took it to the range last Saturday and I'm so pleased with the ease of closing the bolt, the quicker lock time, and much less vibration on ignition.

    Alan charges $200 plus shipping to convert your bolt, and, if you don't like the finished product, he will convert it back to the original for no additional cost. From my experience, once you shoot Alan's bolt revision, you won't want to shoot anything else. If you want more information, give Alan a call at 205-755-4094.

    Bill Schertz
    Ocala, FL

  2. #2
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    Of course you realize you have essentially eliminated one primary ignition feature designed into the action from Flash right up to current makers of the action.

  3. #3
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    Sep 2008
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    Turbo bolts

    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    Of course you realize you have essentially eliminated one primary ignition feature designed into the action from Flash right up to current makers of the action.
    Actually Tim, I don't. Can you enlighten me please?

    Bill

  4. #4
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    Right from the get-go these actions were designed, and have evolved with ignition in mind. That ignition is generally accepted to involve a firing pin with enough mass to get the job done.
    Some folks are of the belief that lighter and faster might be a better solution. I think if you inquire as to wether this represents a popular movement you will find this to be unlikely. The lock time may be an important consideration for position shooters but not for the BR crowd. I realize Alan has his beliefs and is an accomplished action builder but you may not realize, many, if not most of his actions still out there competing have altered ignition involving greater mass.
    I don't know why you had a Sporter done by one of the all time best at building them and didn't get it back to him. Could have been several issues including lubrication, suspect spring, etc. but IMHO you've taken the long way around to go backwards, recent score not withstanding.
    Even Stiller's new action has designed into it mass in the firing system.
    I think what I've listed here to be rather widely accepted but ultimately, your choice to make.

  5. #5
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    Since I was mentioned, I will put my reply in. There are issues that you stated that are definate problems in the Turbo, and they are not easy to fix. The lubrication one is a big one if the bolt is not kept up with in regards to keeping it clean. Hard to do when you lube the cocking cam. The small diameter spring is the other. That is why I designed mine the way I did. I also have the feature that keeps the cocking piece from ever rubbing the action slot or trigger plates. My gut tells me that is a source of flyers in that type of ignition that most people refuse to acknowledge. I believe that either method of mass or light/fast can work. Both have their issues and selling points. I think either one will work if used correctly.

  6. #6
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    Fact or Fiction?

    Allen's design fixes a lot of the problems inherent in the Turbo bolt design with no apparent drawbacks.
    Good ignition requires a certain amount of energy. According to Einstein's theory this can be accomplished either through mass or speed (Lock Time).


    E = mc2, equation in German-born physicist Albert Einstein’s theory of special relativity that showed that the increased relativistic mass (m) of a body comes from the energy of motion of the body—that is, its kinetic energy (E)—divided by the speed of light squared (c2). This equation expresses the fact that mass and energy are the same physical entity and can be changed into each other.

  7. #7
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    More in the realm of m(v^2)/2.

  8. #8
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    Which would indicate

    Quote Originally Posted by Oklahoma Jim View Post
    More in the realm of m(v^2)/2.
    faster makes more energy....and the options are, lighter, heavier spring or longer stroke.

  9. #9
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    Mr. Stiller, your "gut" tells you the way the Turbo action is built can be a source of flyers . Can this be also said of a Falcon action built about 2 years ago. If by chance your answer is yes can it be fixed ? Thanks Richard

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkcal22 View Post
    Mr. Stiller, your "gut" tells you the way the Turbo action is built can be a source of flyers . Can this be also said of a Falcon action built about 2 years ago. If by chance your answer is yes can it be fixed ? Thanks Richard
    I don't think so. Something needs to "clock" the pin. By design, it uses the cocking piece and the action slot/trigger plates. There is nothing other than the internal slot with the pin through it or the front pin that can clock it. Both of those answers are worse. I used the shroud to locate the cocking piece and a pin in the shroud to locate it to the action. The cocking piece is narrow also such that with clearance, tolerance and any other small gotchas, it can never hit the trigger plates.

    The falcon is a different design from the turbo and mine. I am not as familiar with it to state a determination on it.

  11. #11
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    Jerry, this has turned into an interesting technical discussion. I have a follow up question if I may. Now I have both Turbo II actions as well as a 2500X and understand your point. My question is do you have a sense of the frequency of this side plate drag issue? It is something I have always looked at, never really felt I had an issue with my particular actions.
    Are you of the belief that all actions may do it occasionally or some are simply prone to do it?

  12. #12
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    I think it tends to drag every time at the beginning of the fall. Closing the bolt it forces it to one side. What happens to it after the trigger fall is the question. I dont know how much it does. Half the time, 5% 1% none???? I don't like the likelyhood nor the inconsistentcy. That is why mine is different. Mine cannot physically drag by design.

    No one has done a comparison truly apples to apples on an action yet to say which is better though. One day maybe I will. I have yet to see anyone have any real reason with data or even a decent explanation how the turbo style is better, as some seem to believe. Seems like a lot of pretty awesome shooting guns have been built lately on 2500X's. Lots of them up in your neck of the woods.
    Last edited by stiller; 11-19-2014 at 11:21 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by stiller View Post
    I think it tends to drag every time at the beginning of the fall. Closing the bolt it forces it to one side. What happens to it after the trigger fall is the question. I dont know how much it does. Half the time, 5% 1% none???? I don't like the likelyhood nor the inconsistentcy. That is why mine is different. Mine cannot physically drag by design.

    No one has done a comparison truly apples to apples on an action yet to say which is better though. One day maybe I will. I have yet to see anyone have any real reason with data or even a decent explanation how the turbo style is better, as some seem to believe. Seems like a lot of pretty awesome shooting guns have been built lately on 2500X's. Lots of them up in your neck of the woods.
    No doubt,the 2500X's are definitely gaining traction. I guess I'm still somewhat of a skeptic on the drag frequency issue, I've not seen it to speak of or if it exists, it tends to be largely overwhelmed by a proper spring and mass combo. The better guns up around here don't seem to have, what I'd call, fliers.
    Thanks for the thoughts, however.

  14. #14
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    From my experience,

    I have a Hall Sporter which I have been shooting for 4 years now. When I bought it, it seemed to work fine but after not shooting it very long it started to not extract fired cases. I looked with my borescope and found a big dimple at the top of the chamber. I knew very well I had not dry fired the rifle but the dimple was there nevertheless. I bought one of those tools Midway sells to "Iron " out dimples in chambers and sure enough, the dimple returned after another box of ammo was shot through the rifle.

    Took the bolt apart and found someone had added weights which screwed up the length of the pin, which was now extending well beyond the bolt face. Some time after, I went to the Nationals @ Fairchance and found Alan Hall there. I asked him if he would look my bolt over, which he did. He saw the "Weights" which he proceeded to throw as far as he could throw them and configured the bolt to it's original condition. The rifle has worked just fine since.

    In spite of what has been said about Alan's thinking on lock time, etc, I don't see but what his thinking is valid. My Sporter shoots way better than I do all the time and has begun to shoot a few 250's. From my experience with the added weights, all I got was the chance to buy a new tool to correct the damage done by their having been added.

    Pete
    Last edited by Pete Wass; 11-20-2014 at 11:54 PM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    I have a Hall Sporter which I have been shooting for 4 years now. When I bought it, it seemed to work fine but after not shooting it very long it started to not extract fired cases. I looked with my borescope and found a big dimple at the top of the chamber. I knew very well I had not dry fired the rifle but the dimple was there nevertheless. I bought one of those tools Midway sells to "Iron " out dimples in chambers and sure enough, the dimple returned after another box of ammo was shot through the rifle.

    Took the bolt apart and found someone had added weights which screwed up the length of the pin, which was now extending well beyond the bolt face. Some time after, I went to the Nationals @ Fairchance and found Alan Hall there. I asked him if he would look my bolt over, which he did. He saw the "Weights" which he proceeded to throw as far as he could throw them and configured the bolt to it's original condition. The rifle has worked just fine since.

    In spite of what has been said about Alan's thinking on lock time, etc, I don't see but what his thinking is valid. My Sporter shoots way better than I do all the time and has begun to shoot a few 250's. From my experience with the added weights, all I got was the chance to buy a new tool to correct the damage done by their having been added.

    Pete
    Pete

    Having played with a few Hall bolts I can say for a fact the only way the firing pin can touch the barrel is if the firing pin is too long and any weights on or off would make zero difference.

    Uncocked your bolt and look at the tip of the firing pin sticking out, ideally the tip should be 5-10 thou below the end of the bolt.

    Peter

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