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Thread: who makes the best reloading dies for the best accuracy?

  1. #1
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    who makes the best reloading dies for the best accuracy?

    two questions. Is there a generally accepted best accuracy die manufacturer? and 2 are any of the carbide dies on that list? I like the idea of them lasting a long time. Thanks

  2. #2
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    What sort of rifle will you be loading for, and under what conditions will you be shooting it?

  3. #3
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    There are manufacturers who've gained a reputation for being "better" in the sense of "producing more accurate rounds" but in my opinion this is all perception.

    And luck.

    And pure-dee rednekkid ignorance ("Chevy VS Ford")

    Take it from a real die fanatic. I've got thousands of dollars invested in dies from "low end" to the best-of-the-best hand-fitted-to-my-specific-chamber stuff and after having actually SPENT THE MONEY my perspective is that the difference between "good" dies and "bad" dies nearly always devolves to one simple item...... fit. If your dies FIT your chamber you will be happy regardless of mfgr. Spend your time and money finding this FIT, fuhGEDDABOUT who made it





    opinionsby








    al

  4. #4
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    define accuracy, what guns, and as the man said what type of shooting...
    ( the best dies in the wworld will not make your grandathers hunting rifle shoot like a world class benchrst gun. if mod( minute of deer) is all you need..its probably not a die issue)

    mike in co
    Last edited by mike in co; 03-30-2012 at 10:15 AM.

  5. #5
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    A set of Wilson hand dies made a very noticeable difference in accuracy for my off-the-shelf Howa 22-250 with a standard weight barrel after trying Hornady and RCBS dies. That's simply the way it worked for me. Bullet runout was near nill in my lightly neck turned cases.

  6. #6
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    the difference is probably that you quit PULLING a button thru the neck....great source of inaccuracy/bent necks.....
    try using your horn or rcbs dies without the button....
    mike in co
    Quote Originally Posted by spfld View Post
    A set of Wilson hand dies made a very noticeable difference in accuracy for my off-the-shelf Howa 22-250 with a standard weight barrel after trying Hornady and RCBS dies. That's simply the way it worked for me. Bullet runout was near nill in my lightly neck turned cases.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike in co View Post
    the difference is probably that you quit PULLING a button thru the neck....great source of inaccuracy/bent necks.....
    try using your horn or rcbs dies without the button....
    mike in co
    Might have a hard time with bullet seating without that button...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ob1coby View Post
    are any of the carbide dies on that list? I like the idea of them lasting a long time. Thanks
    I do not believe I have ever seen Carbide dies in rifle calibers, only in straight walled pistol calibers.

  9. #9
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    I have two sets of reloading dies from Jim Carstensen and consider them to be my finest dies. They are honed to fit my individual chambers. You can learn more about his dies here:

    http://www.accurateshooter.com/techn...e-conversions/

    Lawrence

  10. #10
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    As Al said, it is all about the fit. I find that, in many cases, it is easier and less expensive to have the chamber made to the die than the other way around. I would add that having the necessary tools to evaluate what you dies are giving you, and how different techniques work is important. Do you have a concentricity gauge, shoulder bump gauge and a way to measure where bullets touch the rifling, and to what length they are seated, measured off their ogives? Also, with proper lubrication, die wear is not usually a problem.

  11. #11
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    Thank you everyone for your help so far. I'm learning a lot. The reason I mentioned carbide is because I literally have over 10k rounds each of 223 and 308 to load. dillon and lyman both have carbide dies for 223 and 308, but I'm not sure of their quality. This thread is just about the dies so all definitions of accuracy are assuming that the rounds are being shot with the highest quality long distance rifles. So now with my questions refined... Assuming the best of shooting equipment and proper fitting, if you were trying to set a new 1000yd world record, what dies would you get to make your rounds. Thanks again for all of the help.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ob1coby View Post
    Thank you everyone for your help so far. I'm learning a lot. The reason I mentioned carbide is because I literally have over 10k rounds each of 223 and 308 to load. dillon and lyman both have carbide dies for 223 and 308, but I'm not sure of their quality. This thread is just about the dies so all definitions of accuracy are assuming that the rounds are being shot with the highest quality long distance rifles. So now with my questions refined... Assuming the best of shooting equipment and proper fitting, if you were trying to set a new 1000yd world record, what dies would you get to make your rounds. Thanks again for all of the help.
    I`d get a die cut by the smith that chambered my barrel cut with the same reamer used to chamber said barrel.

  13. #13
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    The nature of your reloading task will vary depending on whether you are loading for several rifles per calibers, whether they are semiautomatic or not. and whether you want the ammunition to be able to fit in any rifle of that caliber, or just specific firearms. For example, if I were trying for a new 1,000 yard record, I would not be loading with a Dillon, or using one load for thousands of rounds. On the other hand if I were loading for a semiautomatic, I the amount of clearance of ammunition to chamber would be quite different than for a bolt gun. Accuracy is the result of a coordinated system. What constitute the best dies varies a lot with the application. What is desirable in a bolt action target rifle, would not work in a semiautomatic target rifle.

  14. #14
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    DO NOT get a sizer made from the same reamer as cut your chamber. Seaters made from your chamber reamer are OK (altho a bitofa' PITA until you hone 'em out a bit) but trying to make a sizer from your chamber reamer is a no-go. You can't resize to fit your chamber with your chamber

    As far as different dies for different guns...... I'm of two minds here. I'm certainly not hyper-experienced with semi-autos as I've only reloaded for 5 or 6 of them but on two of the "accurate" ones I've run fitted dies with no problems and in any case I've used minimal resizing techniques successfully. In other words I've never found reason to make them sloppy even in semi-autos.

    Now if it was a war gun and needed to fire filthy I'd say "Open Up Them Tolerances!!"

    al

    al

  15. #15
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    Al,
    My perspective on reloading for semiautomatics comes, not so much from personal experience experience, but from paying close attention to what I was told by a fellow who shot his way to High Master in Service Rifle, who coached his son to the point where he was the first junior to wind High Civilian Service Rifle at Camp Perry. Oh, and whose gunsmithing skills were sufficient such that the main shooting team of the Marine Corps purchased one of his M1As, probably to take it apart to see what made it tick. He had a few reloading tricks, but in his opinion spending too much time fiddling with loads was a distraction from something that was more important....practice.
    Boyd

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