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Thread: My farm pond dried up.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Georgia, USA
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    602

    My farm pond dried up.

    I thought I needed to restock my farm pond after it completely dried up last fall then again this spring. Then in late spring we got a lot of rain and it filled up.

    Today I went down to check to see if there was any water in it since we haven't gotten any rain this rummer. There was about 3 inches of water left. It was about 10 yds. across and 30 yds. long.

    To my amazement there are thousands of 1 inch long bream floating dead in it with a few still alive swimming in the shallow water.

    The eggs must have survived in the mud under the dried and cracked mud when the pond completely dried up.

    I never new this was possible. Has anyone else heard of this?

    gt40

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    1,151
    Wish I could have sent you some of our rain this year. We had record rain falls.
    Yes i have heard of this before. One year we had to divert a steam to build a box culvert.
    The fish went into under ground pockets of water and survived till we opened it up again.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    2,748
    That's amazing! I did a quick search and didn't find much on the survival of fish eggs. When I was a young'un we experienced a particularly bad/windy storm that rained newborn frogs and tadpoles - billions upon trillions of them. The sun killed them every one and the smell was intolerable for days. We wore shoes for the rest of the summer. Pretty sure the frogs were the lesser of what could have happened. Truth is, if it had gone the other way, our house would have ended up in the water where all those frogs came from.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    The Heart of Texas
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    244
    Yes
    I have heard of this. I learned about it in Grade School.
    As a note the African Lung fish has been documented to survive up to 3 years of drought by burying itself in the mud and waiting it out when the water hole dries up.

    Ted

  5. #5
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    Feb 2003
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    GT, Don't feel bad its so hot in Texas it all dried up...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    886
    Quote Originally Posted by gt40 View Post
    I thought I needed to restock my farm pond after it completely dried up last fall then again this spring. Then in late spring we got a lot of rain and it filled up.

    Today I went down to check to see if there was any water in it since we haven't gotten any rain this rummer. There was about 3 inches of water left. It was about 10 yds. across and 30 yds. long.

    To my amazement there are thousands of 1 inch long bream floating dead in it with a few still alive swimming in the shallow water.

    The eggs must have survived in the mud under the dried and cracked mud when the pond completely dried up.

    I never new this was possible. Has anyone else heard of this?

    gt40
    That's the prob with a runoff farm pond...no runoff no water. Do you have a site with groundwater that you can dig into? That's a sustainable farm pond.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    964

    Cool GT, don't know how big your spread is, but...................

    if you go here: http://www.acresusa.com/toolbox/articles.htm

    Click on "Toolbox" and click on "Archived articles" and in the left column, scroll down till you see "Milking water from the hills--the Prehn Method"

    If you or someone you know has a tractor, and a little work, it shows you how you can maintain some little 'seeps' for when the rain is sparse, and getting into some groundwater isn't a bad idea, either, if you have the cash & patience...

    And, there are some species of frogs that may remain in a sort of suspended animation for quite some time between desert rainfalls when their areas fill up, and the life & breeding cycle moves rapidly ahead as long as the water remains and eggs are laid, then everything dies off as the water recedes, and you would never know they were there, until the next flooding rain.....which may be five years away.

    But that's not TOO long, the common tick can go 15 years without a meal.....
    Last edited by brian roberts; 07-25-2011 at 09:58 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Georgia, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by glp View Post
    That's the prob with a runoff farm pond...no runoff no water. Do you have a site with groundwater that you can dig into? That's a sustainable farm pond.
    My other pond is maintained by an under ground spring. It almost dried up last fall, but had enough water to let some of the bream & bass survive.

    gt40

  9. #9
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    May 2008
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    Group W Bench
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    Is it possible that the fish eggs were brought in on the legs/feet of herons, cranes, ducks, etc from other lakes?

  10. #10
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    Jun 2003
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    Hondo, TX
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    GT this has happened quite a few times on some family property when I was growing up in West Texas.
    I dont have facts for you but I do have what was passed down.
    There was another large lake some 4-5 miles away and it was said that the egss were brought in by birds.
    Personally I am not sure. I would think if the eggs were eaten it would not have made it through the digestive tract but they could have stuck in some other form, I suppose to the outside of the bird maybe.
    All I know is that I saw the tank dry up quite a few times over the years and the next year there would be fish in it again.

  11. #11
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    Dec 2003
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    washington.........STATE that is.
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    That is steenkin' wild! I had no idea bream would repopulate! Lungfish yes, even the common stickleback will live in swamps that only hav water 3-4 mo of the year but sunfish???

    I'd no idea

    al

  12. #12
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    Jun 2003
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    Hondo, TX
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    IN the aforementioned stock tank the fish in question were catfish, bass, and crappie that would reappear the next year after the tank went bone dry.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Williamsport, PA
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    Back during the construction of the pond at my house, I got a powder you can get by the bag, sorta like the size of a bag of portland, that when used in the soil for a pond, will more or less waterproof it. It happens my pond is dug in clay, so leakage is virtually zero. In the worst drought year I can remember, the water level dropped about 4" and it's a .95 acre pond. (legal limit now in pa without a concrete spillway and classed as a dam). When I installed the standpipe (one of the few things "I" actually did), a bag of this stuff was used to fill in around that pipe and mixed with soil. It then sticks to the pvc pipe that was used. Well, it's been almost 20 years now and it's still there. So I guess it works. I do not recall it being expensive. I know a friend who owns a landscaping business used it in the base of his pond but that is a LOT smaller than mine. His results were not good on the first try, that I remember well (won a bet!).

    If your water is draining down through the ground and out, you may need to excavate the ground some and mix the stuff in. Even using a rental machine and doing it yourself would probably work. I'd want to talk to someone who knows about it and ask questions though. I did it just around a pipe, I do not know how it works when you do large areas, or what the problems might be with it. You might even find there is just one small area where the water drains. Just be careful you don't end up creating a new place.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Western Kansas
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    394
    4Mesh
    Would the stuff you used be driller's mud? It increases in bulk when you add water.
    When I worked for a pipeline company we used is to seal behind a hot cut to minimize flame to the torch area instead of completely around the pipe.
    I know one of the guys had a leakage problem into his basement when it rained so he dug a hole at the point of the leak and poured in dry driller's mud and it did not leak after that.
    We are not having much problem with basements leaking in Dodge City, Ks, we have had approx. 2 inches of rain since last Aug. I think today will be our 36th day in a row over 100 degrees, made it to 111 yesterday.

  15. #15
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    Oct 2003
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    S. E. Missouri
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    Google Bentonite, I believe this is what 4Mesh used and what kansasvet is talking about.
    Jerry

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