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Thread: Favorite Bullet Seating Depth tool?

  1. #1
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    Favorite Bullet Seating Depth tool?

    What say you?

  2. #2
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    GaryO, this is a good topic and I will follow this thread, although it has been covered before it is worth hashing out again. I have a Sinclair, Stoney Point and other methods of finding the lands. I use the Stoney Point a lot, the argument against the Stoney Point is the unfired case as it relates to head space and this is a good point, but I find it a great tool to get you close and adjust from there.
    Dave T

  3. #3
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    I use the Stoney Point/Hornady Lock and Load gages. I added a guide to it to center the gage in the action, which gives me more consistent measurements. Like DaveT said, it is a starting point. I also have a drill and tap so I can make my own cases for calibers that I need. - nhk

  4. #4
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    Yes nhk, we also drill and tap our own cases after being fired a couple times. But please show us a pic of your centering guide.
    Dave T

  5. #5
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    Gage guide

    The guide is 1.25" long X .375" ID and .695" OD and is held in place where ever you want it by an o-ring slipped on either side of the bushing. I did this before I got my lathe, so I used bronze bushings from Ace Hardware. Now I would make one out of Delrin or aluminum. I slide it to where it is centered in the rear of the action and you can see it holds the case pretty well centered. - nhk
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  6. #6
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    Very cool nhk and yes it does look nice and lined up.
    Dave T

  7. #7
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    I use a dummy round with some lube on the ogive area of the bullet.

    Ted

  8. #8
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    I like the Sinclair tool. It allows me to check a variety of cartridges without needing a seperate tool or adaptor for each one.

  9. #9
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    Explanation please.

    Quote Originally Posted by TedH View Post
    I use a dummy round with some lube on the ogive area of the bullet.

    Ted
    Ted - Could you explain how you set up and use the dummy round and what you are looking for? Thanks. - nhk

  10. #10
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    I'm firmly with Ted.

    I think that adding tools only increases the likelihood of tolerance stack.

    I don't use lube like Ted does but other than that....... here's how I've done it. Several options.

    Most often I simply deprime a case, run thru the resizer to set the neck tension at about .001-.0015 interference to overcome the ejector plunger spring and have at it. I seat a bullet 'long,' measure, close the bolt and remeasure to see that it moved. The remeasured round is "jamset" by the rifling lands. No tools, it's actually set by the rifle, in the rifle, on one of your own rounds.

    Some alternatives;
    -remove the ejector if you're REALLY trying to find .000 engagement (I dunno WHY but anyways...)
    -color the bullet with a silver sharpie to easily see engagement marks
    -slot a neck with a small saw for an adjustable tension round
    -simply tap a small ding in a fired neck if in the field

    etc etc... all better ways than interjecting an unnecessary tool.

    opinionsby


    al

  11. #11
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    if one uses thier own fired cases, no need for a centering tool. drill and tap your own case....no issues.
    i did make expanders to get close to zero bullet hold, and still straight.
    use the same bullet as the bbl wears, so the measurements mean something.
    i do not go for jam, but for touch. the same touch a machinist uses when using a mic. touch, not a c clamp.
    my issue with those that do jam is that in my opinion it is not precise. how many of you have optical comparitors to measure the lenght and width of the marks ??
    and a newly chambered bbl will not have the same "seat" /contact as a worn fired bbl.....so how does the initial measurement relate to later meaurements ?
    again just my opinion.
    ( so yes i use the basic stoney point tools but typically my own cases.)
    mike in co

  12. #12
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    Contrary to popular opinion, not all barrels shoot at jam

  13. #13
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    bob, that is just one more reason to be able to measure where the lands are not not some amount of jamb based on lenght eguals width, ot twice the width..etc.
    mike in co
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Kingsbury View Post
    Contrary to popular opinion, not all barrels shoot at jam

  14. #14
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    I do it pretty close to the way that Al explains it. However after I seat the bullet in the case, I put a bit of case lube on the bullet so it doesn't get stuck in the lands and pull out.
    Then I know where the lands are. I use a fairly long pointy bullet with a 10 GO so there isn't to much of the bullet left in the case next when by the time I give it about .005 jam.
    Ted

  15. #15
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    Dummy round

    Quote Originally Posted by TedH View Post
    I do it pretty close to the way that Al explains it. However after I seat the bullet in the case, I put a bit of case lube on the bullet so it doesn't get stuck in the lands and pull out.
    Then I know where the lands are. I use a fairly long pointy bullet with a 10 GO so there isn't to much of the bullet left in the case next when by the time I give it about .005 jam.
    Ted
    I was wondering if you were looking for the jam length or a certain amount of rifling engraving. I've done that (without lube) and stuck a few bullets, or had different lengths due to some of the bullets getting pulled back out slightly on extraction. I prefer to see where they just 'touch' and then adjust from that length, which for me is 0.010-0.015" jump for 'naked' bullets and 0.010-0.020" jam on coated bullets. I always keep in mind I may need to extract a round and a pulled bullet sure can make a mess. Thanks. - nhk

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