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Thread: DPMS Low Pro Receiver?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    53

    DPMS Low Pro Receiver?

    Anyone had expereince with the DPMS Low PRO uppers? They are the extruded tube no frills 6066 T6 aluminum receivers. They are supposedly hard anodized. They are evidently extruded as opposed to forged 7075 T6. Do these seem to be holding up to use? Anything to be alarmed about? Thanks for your input STBE

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    445
    if it has the features you desire, they are quite safe to use.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    130
    I own a DPMS High Rise receiver and I have fired several Lo Pro and standard receivers. They are fine and I would buy another. My High Rise receiver is on a Highpower match rifle.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    aurora, co
    Posts
    3,475
    i do not believe the extrusions are as hard/strong as the forge/billet rcvrs.
    i have an early flat top dpms, and the rear pivot pin hole went oval on me.....not good

    just depends on your use....i would get a forge/billet flat top and add a riser....

    mike in co

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    South Central WI
    Posts
    181
    one thing I DO like about the low pro receiver is they are stiff as hell. Very thick walled and rigid. They make a very good precision rifle upper.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    130
    STBE Harris

    Why do you believe the DPMS receivers are manufactured from 6061 alloy? I can't find anything on DPMS's web site to indicate that they aren't manufactured from one of the other alloys. Any of the common alloys can be extruded or forged, so it's a mistake to assume any particular mix of alloy and production of the basic stock.

    Forged parts from a die forging offer an advantage in grain flow around the various details and might even provide a useful improvement around details such as the protruding lugs on an AR receiver. Extruded parts can be heat treated to the same strength levels in the longitudinal grain direction, but may give up ductility in the transverse directions. Hand forged billets really offer no substantial advantage over plate or extruded stock, so even using the term "forging" might not mean what many people assume.

    My match rifle has a 24 inch barrel with a diameter about 0.930 inches. I've more or less fallen on the gun in matches, probably let the upper flop open when I've had too much junk in my hands, and I haven't had a problem.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    aurora, co
    Posts
    3,475
    Quote Originally Posted by AeroE View Post
    STBE Harris

    My match rifle has a 24 inch barrel with a diameter about 0.930 inches. I've more or less fallen on the gun in matches, probably let the upper flop open when I've had too much junk in my hands, and I haven't had a problem.
    just for the record, my dpms upper that streched was on a 26" 1" muzzle 223....

    mike in co

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