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Thread: Barrel Stamping

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Battleboro, NC
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    7

    Barrel Stamping

    I have just finished a .308 Win, and I would like the caliber stamped on the barrel. I know there are tools available for this. Does anybody have any recommended tools/one's to avoid? I'm trying to get it so that it doesn't have any misalignments.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    1,868
    It takes a bit of practice to hand stamp. I tape a piece of steel measuring tape on the barrel and use the edge of it to align each stamp. As I am right handed and right eyed I stamp from right to left sighting down the right edge of the stamp to align the spacing.


  3. #3
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    Oct 2008
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    LaPorte City, Ia.
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    Dennis: That is perfect.

  4. #4
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    May 2006
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    Hubert, NC
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    Quality stamp sets are really hard to find. Industry seldom uses them nowadays and the best ones available a few years ago seem to have disapeared from the market. Young Brothers are the most common and they work ok but need some prep work using a pedestal grinder. Practice on a scrap barrel or piece of stock and when you go to your new barrel, double check your stamp to make sure you have it oriented correctly before you strike. There is a technique of rocking the stamp to follow the radius of the barrel and striking several times to get the numbers to impress completely, and there are some magazine articles out there that show the method pretty well. Practice is the key!

    Scott Roeder

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the info. Is there any other method? Machine shop with CNC (as I don't readily have access to CNC)?

  6. #6
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    Actually most of us use New Hermes Engravers in different models. I have a couple barrels that are done with CNC.
    Butch

  7. #7
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    Feb 2003
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    Maidens, Va
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    Quote Originally Posted by SGS View Post
    Quality stamp sets are really hard to find. Industry seldom uses them nowadays and the best ones available a few years ago seem to have disapeared from the market. Young Brothers are the most common and they work ok but need some prep work using a pedestal grinder. Practice on a scrap barrel or piece of stock and when you go to your new barrel, double check your stamp to make sure you have it oriented correctly before you strike. There is a technique of rocking the stamp to follow the radius of the barrel and striking several times to get the numbers to impress completely, and there are some magazine articles out there that show the method pretty well. Practice is the key!

    Scott Roeder
    Mr. Roeder;
    Do you by chance know how stamps were made during the 1940s and 50s? I posted this question on Practical Machinist forum also..I am assuming engraved by hand, and then hardened.. but I really don't know.. It's for a law enforcement issue..I'd like to be correct..
    That's for your help..
    Jerry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    445
    i cant speak for the 40's and 50's, but ive seen the photo's in a book of winchesters stamps from the 1890's-1920's. they were hand cut stamps , and were replaced as they wore out.

  9. #9
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    Feb 2003
    Location
    Missouri
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    130
    There are several around that are hand cutting touch mark stamps, and one gentleman that posts at PM has hand cut stamps to replace missing pieces from an old set, but I don't recall that even he made a complete set, that's pretty ambitious, particularly to reproduce a complicated font.

    The good longrifle builders simply chase their signature and any other info they want into the barrel with a graver and hammer.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    41
    Fellas,

    I'm getting ready to order a set of the Young Bros. hand finished, most likely in 3/32 size.
    1/16 just seems a little small appearance wise, although they might be easier to get a good imprint with. I just like the look of a 3/32 letter better even though it might be a bit harder to get a good looking imprint but I'm willing to practice.

    Any comments on letter size?

    Bob

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    136
    I know that you originally posted about stamps. Have you looked at the electro etching tools. They do a very professional job too!

    http://www.lectroetch.com/hand.html

    Bob

  12. #12
    Jim Kobe Guest
    I have stampls for three calibers, 308 win, 223Rem, and 22-250. They were all custom made a while ago and I used them a lot. They are still sharp and like new. Since I got my Hermes I no longer need them. I think I paid about $35 apiece for them and if anyone neds one, let me entertain an offer. I also have one with my name on it but I doublt anyone would like to stamp my name on their barrel.

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim Kobe; 06-17-2011 at 09:26 AM. Reason: spelling

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Tauranga, New Zealand.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbstallings View Post
    I have just finished a .308 Win, and I would like the caliber stamped on the barrel. I know there are tools available for this. Does anybody have any recommended tools/one's to avoid? I'm trying to get it so that it doesn't have any misalignments.

    Stamping can be 'ok' if you do it perfectly, but I prefer to have my barrels engraved as I feel it gives a much better and more professional finish. Also no stress induced into the steel surface in the process.

    You could have your local engraver do it for you?

    Or, if you are doing alot of barrels look at buying an old pantograph engraving machine. I bought one cheap 6 or 7 years ago as most of the engraving shops now run computer controlled machines. Get a set of letter/number stencils made up in the font/style of lettering you want and you are good to go.

    Cheers,

    Dean.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    1,868
    Quote Originally Posted by zp3design View Post
    Fellas,

    I'm getting ready to order a set of the Young Bros. hand finished, most likely in 3/32 size.
    1/16 just seems a little small appearance wise, although they might be easier to get a good imprint with. I just like the look of a 3/32 letter better even though it might be a bit harder to get a good looking imprint but I'm willing to practice.

    Any comments on letter size?

    Bob
    3/32 would look good. Mine are 1/16... sometimes I wish I had both sets.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Poetry, Tex.
    Posts
    4,970
    This machine may go at a very cheap price.
    http://www.renebates.com/cgi-bin/mnl...bates83/ART119

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