Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 34

Thread: Precision Matthews Lathe arrived last week

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    25

    Precision Matthews Lathe arrived last week

    Hi All:

    I posted a thread about 3 weeks ago discussing my purchase of a PM 1340 lathe. It arrived last Tuesday and I've just had the time to photograph the crates along with the moving skates I used to wrangle the beast into my shop.

    I've included some pix of the crated lathe and some views of its temp orientation in the shop. I'll start uncrating it this week and begin assembling and locating the lathe.

    Any comments or suggestions as I go along would be greatly appreciated as I've not set up a shop before.

    I sort of have the traffic flow figured out, however I do have some preliminary questions.

    For instance how do I locate the center point for lifting the lathe?

    I have to set up the base prior to mounting the lathe. Should I fabricate a permanent trolley/casters attaching the leveling pads to that trolley? If I do this I can level the lathe with the pads. If I ever have to move it I can lift the pads and use the trolley aspect. What do you think?

    What order should I use to assemble the various components?

    There are almost no instructions on assembly. Can anyone help?

    I do have an aptitude for figuring things out but if I can avoid mistakes, so much the better, yes?

    Thanks to all in advance.

    Jon


    Anyway
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1340psient crate 1.jpg 
Views:	1286 
Size:	24.0 KB 
ID:	8848   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1340psient crate 2.jpg 
Views:	1012 
Size:	36.5 KB 
ID:	8849   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1340psient crate 3.jpg 
Views:	1060 
Size:	26.7 KB 
ID:	8850   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1340psient crate 4.jpg 
Views:	1017 
Size:	51.4 KB 
ID:	8851   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1340psient crate 5.jpg 
Views:	1360 
Size:	27.4 KB 
ID:	8852  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1
    I have a similar lathe. To lift it i put a strap around the bed, the fat part just under the head stock. The strap should not go around anything but the bed or you may bend lead screw. Then lift it up by the strap a bit and move the carriage and/or tail stock back and forth to get it to balance. Have your stand pre assembled with any adjusting feet you may want to build and set her on then level.

    Once I opened the crate there were some instruction showing how to sling it. Check in your box.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Tidewater, Virginia
    Posts
    59
    What Crankbender said: Don't put the strap over the lead screw, it might deform it.
    Here is how I lifted mine.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    San Angelo, Texas
    Posts
    851
    psient.....your lathe will come with a book describing/illustrating the proper lifting points...don't get ahead of yourself..."read all of the instructions before starting"...!!!!!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Monrovia, Ca
    Posts
    121
    That looks like my Birmingham may be made by the same company. Anyway it will be very top heavy and all the weight is in the head stock. Just go slow and be careful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankbender View Post
    Once I opened the crate there were some instruction showing how to sling it. Check in your box.
    Thanks. I'll look again. I didn't find any on the first pass. If I'm missing any docs I'll call Matt and see if he cant send them.

    Looks pretty straight forward. The pix really help.

    I'll shoot some of the lathe in it's uncratedness and post them.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by eww1350 View Post
    psient.....your lathe will come with a book describing/illustrating the proper lifting points...don't get ahead of yourself..."read all of the instructions before starting"...!!!!!!!
    Yeah you're right. I have looked at the docs that I've found but haven't noticed any that refer to a lifting method. The operating/assembly instruction booklet that was sent with the lathe did not specify.

    There are a lot of pieces to fit and I'll shoot pix this afternoon to post.

    Jon

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by David Sengelaub View Post
    That looks like my Birmingham may be made by the same company. Anyway it will be very top heavy and all the weight is in the head stock. Just go slow and be careful.
    Thanks David. Like you say, I'm not in any rush.

    I'm not an expert but I researched the various brands out there before ordering. From what I gleaned from the forums and other sources looked at, most advertised lathes are manufactured in maybe 3 locations. Each factory takes orders accommodating specific variations for private labeling. Your Birmingham could very well come for one of these manufacturing points. This would make it very similar to my PM.

    I'll post pix of where I am in the process this afternoon.

    Thanks again,

    Jon

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fort Worth Texas
    Posts
    1,536
    Ron I have a lathe similar to yours and have been considering getting a better cabinet to set it on. When I bought it used, the dealer used a forklift to move it while the lathe was attached to the cabinet. This bent the chip pan and I'm not comfortable with the stability. I have a shop crane like yours with straps and a load leveler. I had thought of using a setup as you show but was concerned that the lathe could "roll" as it was lifted. No sign of such a tendency when you lifted yours?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    25

    In all it's uncratedness

    OK so I rolled the lathe out of the shop and arrayed the various stuff to display what I need to assemble. I went through all this stuff once before and found no assembly or CG information. Photos below.

    I called Matt and asked for the missing instructions. He's sending what he has in an email.

    I'll keep unfolding the assembly one step at a time. I'm going to measure the Bases and fabricate a rolling base w/leveling feet. I'll do the take off and buy the steel. Photos of what I come up with will follow.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PM1340 uncrated 1.jpg 
Views:	1288 
Size:	35.4 KB 
ID:	8853   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PM1340 uncrated 3.jpg 
Views:	1135 
Size:	23.6 KB 
ID:	8854   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PM1340 uncrated 5.jpg 
Views:	1370 
Size:	32.8 KB 
ID:	8855   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PM1340 uncrated 6.jpg 
Views:	1193 
Size:	31.5 KB 
ID:	8856   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PM1340 uncrated 7.jpg 
Views:	1255 
Size:	21.0 KB 
ID:	8857  

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Tidewater, Virginia
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by adamsgt View Post
    Ron I have a lathe similar to yours and have been considering getting a better cabinet to set it on. When I bought it used, the dealer used a forklift to move it while the lathe was attached to the cabinet. This bent the chip pan and I'm not comfortable with the stability. I have a shop crane like yours with straps and a load leveler. I had thought of using a setup as you show but was concerned that the lathe could "roll" as it was lifted. No sign of such a tendency when you lifted yours?
    I was mindful that it might want to roll, but it did not shift in the straps in any way.

    Notice how the straps straddle the chuck, that adds some vertical support. You could tie the chuck to the straps for additional support if you were still doubtful. (I donít think it would roll even if you tried.)

    The strap was started under the chuck end (even length like a shoestring), then left to the outside, crossed, and then back under the headstock to the bed, and up past the chuck. The strap couldnít slide.
    Last edited by Ron of Va; 12-08-2009 at 01:09 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    39
    From your pic's You have coolent , stand, splash guards and chip tray also maybe a foot brake. here is a pic from there web sight that show one put together to look at that may help.
    http://precisionmatthews.com/PM1330-1340Lathe.html

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Kurt Westfall View Post
    From your pic's You have coolent , stand, splash guards and chip tray also maybe a foot brake. here is a pic from there web sight that show one put together to look at that may help.
    http://precisionmatthews.com/PM1330-1340Lathe.html
    Thanks Kurt:

    I am familiar with this. However, I feel pretty confident if you guys can't help me at some point I can go to Matt.

    For now, I have to plan and take off for the mobile leveling base. I remember seeing someone's plans that used 2X4 square tubing for the carriage. The base was made by using the tubing vertically rather than horizontally. Mounting points were drilled and tapped. Leveling legs were located beneath the mounting points.
    The tubing extended on the length dimension outboard of the actual base then here were mounted the casters. The two base carriages were joined by a lateral cross member.

    Therefore, you leveled the lathe with the leveling feet AFTER you carted the beast into position. By raising the machine you lifted it beyond the contact height for the casters. I suppose you could make the casters detachable.

    If you ever needed to move the lathe you lowered the mobile frame to the point where the casters made contact and it would now roll.

    I think I'll do something along this line as the materials are pretty standard, I have the mill and a drill press. I may just figure out a way to use those skates instead of the casters.

    Anyway, I'll design this and start buying the materials, then weld it together, clean it up and paint it.

    Jon

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    28
    Looking forward to a review once you get it up ad running, of all the import lathes this model interests me the most.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    29
    I bought the PM1440 but it came to my door fully assembled. The start circut in the motor was bad and required a helping hand to start it. (dangerous). I called Matt and he sent me a new motor right away.
    I did break one of the bolts that hold the compound to the cross slide from over tightening it. I used a temporary hand ground bolt to hold it in place while I made new ones out of a grade 8 bolt. I also replaced the set screws in the tool holders as they stripped easily.
    I have had it for about 6 months and have no major problems with it. After leveling it and adjusting the tailstock it cuts to the test specs.
    I like the foot brake especially after seeing pics of a guy wrapped up in a lathe.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •