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Thread: Focusing Lyman Super Targetspot

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Lake Vermilion, Big Bay. Minnesota
    Posts
    2

    Focusing Lyman Super Targetspot

    Hello,

    New to the forum and trying to find a solution to a scope question.

    My uncle sent me an old Lyman Super Targetspot 25X and I'm trying to figure out how to adjust the focus.

    It works fine at the 25, 50, and 100 yd. increments by turning the objective lens, but at 200 yds. things start to get blurry...

    Is there a way to focus this scope for ranges of 200 yds. + ?
    I was told that the ocular may need to be adjusted for my eyesight but I don't know the steps to take to do this.

    There are two rings forward of the ocular. The most forward ring has 2 small set screws. I'm wondering how I go about adjusting this (if it's necessary) to adjust the scope so it's at an "infinity" type setting for longer ranges.

    Sorry for the long post. Would just like to utilize the higher power for ranges past 200 yds. but right now things get fuzzy that far away.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Mark

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    4,267
    Focus the target by looking through the scope. The numbers on the objective lense is just for reference. Look through the scope and get the clearest picture, then move your head side to side slightly, does the cross hair move on the target? If so, keep moving the focus ring slightly till you have a clear picture and the cross hair doesn't move. This exercise is called removing the parallax. Simply put, this moves the target image to the same focal plane as the cross hair.

    Adjust the back bell till you have the clearest view of the cross hair itself. Adjust, then look away and keep doing this till you get the clearest image of the cross hair.

    Get on eBay and search for a Lyman Super Targetspot. You will find your uncle gave you a really nice gift.
    Last edited by JerrySharrett; 08-24-2009 at 05:17 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,868
    The front objective lens is used for parallax adjustment at various distances and may be a bit tricky and slow to focus at longer ranges if there are no reference marks. Trial and error until you get it. If I remember correctly no screws are used to do this.

    The rear lens is used only to focus the reticle for sharpness for your eye and is done by backing the lens off until the cross hair is blurry, then adjust it in and glance though the scope at the sky or a distant cloud... and adjust until the cross hair appears sharp. This adjustment is not done while looking through the scope as your eye will adjust slightly, it is best done by adjust - look through - adjust - look though until you get it done... and it is best done not looking at something other than the sky or distant cloud.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Lake Vermilion, Big Bay. Minnesota
    Posts
    2
    Thanks for the quick reply guys!

    Well, I think I have it adjusted about right. Don't have any yardage particulars, but looking out over a lake up here it's clear WAY out there on the whitecaps.

    Right now I have it on an older, tastefully sporterized (if that's possible) Remington 1917 Enfield in 30-06. Once boresighted I moved out to 100 yds... These old Remington's can shoot! Don't know how to measure groups, but with 180 gr. handloads: one three shot string two were touching, pretty much splitting each other in two, and the third was probably pushing an inch off those two.

    More than likely this scope will go on an early 22 Target rifle, but it's fun to see the potential of these WWII rifles realized. The scope was originally on a marlin ballard 22 set for competition, and also for a martini 22.

    Will see if I can upload a pic of the rifle and scope. It's not a benchrest gun, but...
    Thanks again for the help!

    PS: Yeah, these scopes are expensive! Two a few years ago I thought they were going for around $250-275...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,868
    Officially groups are measured from center to center of the two holes farthest apart.

    For ease of unofficially measuring groups you can measure from the outside edges of the two holes farthest apart and subtract what one hole actually measures and get a pretty good figure. Holes usually measure smaller than the caliber of the bullet unless you are shooting wad cutters.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    4,267
    Quote Originally Posted by 300H&H View Post
    Thanks for the quick reply guys!

    Well, I think I have it adjusted about right. Don't have any yardage particulars, but looking out over a lake up here it's clear WAY out there on the whitecaps.

    Right now I have it on an older, tastefully sporterized (if that's possible) Remington 1917 Enfield in 30-06. Once boresighted I moved out to 100 yds... These old Remington's can shoot! Don't know how to measure groups, but with 180 gr. handloads: one three shot string two were touching, pretty much splitting each other in two, and the third was probably pushing an inch off those two.

    More than likely this scope will go on an early 22 Target rifle, but it's fun to see the potential of these WWII rifles realized. The scope was originally on a marlin ballard 22 set for competition, and also for a martini 22.

    Will see if I can upload a pic of the rifle and scope. It's not a benchrest gun, but...
    Thanks again for the help!

    PS: Yeah, these scopes are expensive! Two a few years ago I thought they were going for around $250-275...
    Ahh, the P17 Enfield. I made a sporter one time out of an Eddystone Enfield. It came out real well. It was probably the toughest action to machine that I ever tired. I'm talking about machining the old sights off.

    The prices I've seen lately for the Lyman Super Targetspot was in the $550-$650 range.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Texas... of course
    Posts
    68

    Focus for Lyman Target Scope

    If you will send me your snail mail address I will send you a copy of the LYMAN Target Spot instructions for focusing your scope. Send it by Private Messages... upper corner of the page under your name.

    Dew

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