Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Savage 3-position safety. . . .

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    289

    Savage 3-position safety. . . .

    Over the last few months, I have seen comments on shooting forums where some shooters really dislike the Savage 3-position safety, and even go so far as to say they wouldn't have such a rifle. I find this perplexing.

    For those that don't know this safety, the three positions are -- 1. safe-- won't fire, locks action; 2. safe-- won't fire, action can be opened and closed; 3. fire.

    The reason I think this safety is good has to do with instances where a shooter has to work a live round through a rifle in the workshop or house.

    I was just reading one of the reloading manuals yesterday. It was an older Hornady manual. The manual suggests jacking one of the reloaded rounds through the rifle to be sure the action will cycle with that round.

    No one ever likes to put a loaded round in a rifle in the house. On those rare occasions when this occurs, wouldn't the Savage three-position safety be a GOOD thing? Just set the safety on position 2, as described above.

    Are there any drawbacks to a 3-position safety?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Billings, Montana
    Posts
    1,465
    The only drawback I can see to a three position safety is if a person doesn't know it's a three position and only slides it to the middle position and gets a no fire condition in the field. That could happen with any three position safety, and a properly adjusted Savage safety is easy to operate and allows the middle position to be easily felt. The only exception would be if the shooter were wearing heavy gloves or had a cold or otherwise numb thumb.

    It's an excellent safety feature IMHO, and used in a lot of other rifles besides Savages.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    1,086
    I was just reading one of the reloading manuals yesterday. It was an older Hornady manual. The manual suggests jacking one of the reloaded rounds through the rifle to be sure the action will cycle with that round.

    No one ever likes to put a loaded round in a rifle in the house. On those rare occasions when this occurs, wouldn't the Savage three-position safety be a GOOD thing? Just set the safety on position 2, as described above.

    Are there any drawbacks to a 3-position safety?


    Yes I agree, I have done the same testing for many years for hunting re-loads. or for new brass loads. However in every case, the firing pin was removed. This is a vary safe method to preform with the M-70 action and the Mauser modified action. Without the firing pin removed I would not trust any cocked action in any indoor application. Just my two cents.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    544
    Quote Originally Posted by Montana Pete View Post
    The reason I think this safety is good has to do with instances where a shooter has to work a live round through a rifle in the workshop or house.

    I was just reading one of the reloading manuals yesterday. It was an older Hornady manual. The manual suggests jacking one of the reloaded rounds through the rifle to be sure the action will cycle with that round.
    Why would you need to chamber a loaded round to check the cycling of the rifle? Ever hear of a dummy round? The best safety is between your ears.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,289

    Hal ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hal D. View Post
    Why would you need to chamber a loaded round to check the cycling of the rifle? Ever hear of a dummy round? The best safety is between your ears.
    Good reply !!! An empty case with no primer and seated bullet, makes a great little tool. I make one up now and then for a variety of tests.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,289

    Smile Big Al ...

    Nice balmy weather you're having in Alaska.

    I passed through WASILLA yesterday on my way to the Muzzel Loading Territorial Matches being held about 3 miles south of the TALKEETNA turnoff.

    Now there's a shooting sport! Or, rather yet, a cleanig and loading sport. My brother invited me to shoot with him, so I shot in their version of benchrest competition. They have many different classes to shoot in. Plus, knife and hatchet throwing! For a 30 minute, 5-shot record target, you spend 29 1/2 minutes cleaning and loading and 1/2 minute shooting ... and guessing where that 54 caliber ball is going to end up since you use open metal sights, and for most of the competitors, old eyes (not a good combination). Not my cup of tea. The cleaning and loading will wear you out. I admire them for their enthusiasm and stamina.

    Everyone was complaining how hot it was. 83 degrees! I invited them to Austin to experience some of our relentless triple digit weather. I enjoy Alaska for three weeks in the summer. You've got a great state.

    [Sorry for the topic digression.]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    S.E. MI
    Posts
    1,480
    Well Pete,
    I think, the 3 position safety is great.
    I think, it's for the 2% crowd. That don't read the rules or the operating instructions.
    That way if they can't make it work. They are DQ'd.
    NO DANGEROUS OPERATORS ALLOWED.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    289
    Hal D writes, Why would you need to chamber a loaded round to check the cycling of the rifle? Ever hear of a dummy round? The best safety is between your ears.
    As I stated, my Hornady Reloading Manual recommends it, as follows: "Before our reloader seats bullets in the rest of the cartridges however, he makes a final check with his first reloaded cartridge by chambering it in the rifle he'll shoot to be sure of a proper fit."

    A photo next to this paragraph shows a man inserting a loaded cartridge into a rifle.

    This happens to be the Hornady Manual Vol. 2, copyright 1973, page 41. I would not be surprised if similar advice is found in other reloading manuals.

    The use of a dummy cartridge may work if the reloader happens to own a bullet puller. (Unless the reloader would like to end up with a reloaded box of 19 cartridges.) Same for removing the firing pin -- if the reloader has the ability to do this.

    Let's face it -- many reloaders are just going to follow the instructions in their reloading manual. If so, a three-position safety becomes a useful feature.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Youngsville, NC
    Posts
    958

    Safeties..

    Safeties are mechanical devices just looking for a place to fail. Just as with Military training one should not put a round in the chamber until it is ready to be fired.

    I have extremely light trigger pulls on all of my rifles. When they are being handled or transported with a round in the barrel the bolt remains up on those who cock on closing.

    Nat Lambeth

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    1,086
    Quote Originally Posted by abintx View Post
    Nice balmy weather you're having in Alaska.

    I passed through WASILLA yesterday on my way to the Muzzel Loading Territorial Matches being held about 3 miles south of the TALKEETNA turnoff.

    Now there's a shooting sport! Or, rather yet, a cleanig and loading sport. My brother invited me to shoot with him, so I shot in their version of benchrest competition. They have many different classes to shoot in. Plus, knife and hatchet throwing! For a 30 minute, 5-shot record target, you spend 29 1/2 minutes cleaning and loading and 1/2 minute shooting ... and guessing where that 54 caliber ball is going to end up since you use open metal sights, and for most of the competitors, old eyes (not a good combination). Not my cup of tea. The cleaning and loading will wear you out. I admire them for their enthusiasm and stamina.

    Everyone was complaining how hot it was. 83 degrees! I invited them to Austin to experience some of our relentless triple digit weather. I enjoy Alaska for three weeks in the summer. You've got a great state.

    [Sorry for the topic digression.]

    We like it also.


    Wish that more people found they didn't like it that much.

    I'm not sure it has made it to 80 degrees doewn in ae neck of the woods quite yet. High 70's is enough. Going to be hard to keep up with the garden this summer, growing like a weed.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •