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Thread: Latest and greatest Carbon Killer

  1. #1
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    Latest and greatest Carbon Killer

    Saw a YouTube the other day of a lad demonstrating the efficacy of CLR as a carbon killer. I don't have any dirty barrels at the moment but will give it a whack. Certainly much less expensive that the traditional Gun brands.

    Pete

  2. #2
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    According to reports, it will take bluing right off, and I am not sure about other metal coatings.

  3. #3
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    It doesn't seem

    Quote Originally Posted by Boyd Allen View Post
    According to reports, it will take bluing right off, and I am not sure about other metal coatings.
    to etch stainless steel they say. I guess use with caution, eh?

    Pete

  4. #4
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    Or you could simply go with the better solution, Bore Tech C4 , there’s a reason so many use it RF & CF.

  5. #5
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    to make some one rich ?
    clr works great as do various old formula top engine cleaners.
    typically 1/2 the cost or less
    (no idea where all the spaces came from)
























































































































    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    Or you could simply go with the better solution, Bore Tech C4 , there’s a reason so many use it RF & CF.

  6. #6
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    On the CLR we sight, it says the dairy industry uses it to clean Stainless Steel Milk Tanks with no reactive affects.

    I suppose most of those are fabricated from 316, which is an Austenetic Stainless rather Martensetic such as 416R.

    It says to keep away from Aluminum and Cast Iron. So be careful around your Panda’s and frying pans.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    It says to keep away from Aluminum and Cast Iron. So be careful around your Panda’s and frying pans.
    Believe the US Army put out a bulletin about forbidding the use of charcoal grill cleaners for removing carbon on M16 rifles in the late 1960s or early 1970s. Issue was not carbon removal, which the "cleaner" excelled at, but rather, its effects on the 7076 alloy of the receivers. Seems the active ingredient in the cleaner was sodium hydroxide, which aggressively ate away the aluminum. Have no evidence this bulletin existed, but it is a warning about the possible unintended consequences of using an unapproved cleaner.

    Speaking of chemistry, am curious if anyone has ever looked into the long term effects of "cooking" CLP type compounds? Issue is that at high temperatures, Teflon (a lubricant found in some CLPs) and similar compounds (such as Freon) break down, forming highly corrosive hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids. (The warning re: not using Teflon coated cookware above 400 *F is so the coating does not begin shedding, Do not know temperature range when acid formation begins, but training notes these acids will be present following large fires in areas containing Freon and Teflon compounds.) Understand the amount of Teflon in CLP is tiny, however, do not underestimate the corrosiveness of hydrofluoric acid - diluted, it etches aluminum. It is one of the few compounds which dissolves glass, and it also eats away at items found in the body, such as bones and nerve tissue.

    Sorry for the "gloom and doom" post, but both items are issues we (firearms owners) need to remember.

  8. #8
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    Dissolving Carbon

    The day that somebody invents a solvent for carbon then the world shall have a new billionaire.

    Many products claim to 'soften' carbon deposits but then after that it's all down to grease.

    A short stroked brush and 'Elbow Grease'

    * doggie *

  9. #9
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    as dow use to say in the late 60/70's
    better living thru better CHEMISTRY

    i like the chemical approach

  10. #10
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    I use Kroil to knock carbon out. My borescope shows it works.

    -Lee
    www.singleactions.com

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsmithsr View Post
    as dow use to say in the late 60/70's
    better living thru better CHEMISTRY

    i like the chemical approach


    I believe it was DuPont

  12. #12
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    I still have several cans of the old GM Tech top engine cleaner.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butch Lambert View Post
    I still have several cans of the old GM Tech top engine cleaner.
    Me too!

  14. #14
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    From the company's MSDS

    Restrictions on Use Incompatible with strong oxidizing agents, metals (except stainless steel, chrome),
    acids, bases, and bleach.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsmithsr View Post
    as dow use to say in the late 60/70's
    better living thru better CHEMISTRY

    i like the chemical approach
    Didn't Ozzy Osbourne say that also?

    Later
    Dave

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