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Thread: Need advice testing ammo.

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    403
    Quote Originally Posted by bob finger View Post
    Yes, Bill sleeved actions. I once watched him work on one in his shop, but probably not this one. Another thing; Bill was one of the best in his business when it came to adhesives. Through his "day job" he had access to some very sophisticated aero-space adhesives and knew their properties and applied that knowledge to br guns. I'm also in agreement with Tim. If he barreled this rifle the word Myers should be stamped somewhere near the action on the barrel, and visible without needing to remove the stock to see it. He has been gone for years and I still miss his company. bob
    Hi Bob,

    If I remember correctly, Bill always called his glue-ins a semi glue-in, although I'm not sure what the difference is between a semi and regular glue-in.
    I also remember asking him what he used for bedding material and the glue-in, but he told me it was a secret and I'm not sure he told anybody what it was.

    Does the above sound right?

    I miss him also. He was a Hell of a lot of fun to visit with over the phone (didn't like emails) and I wish I'd had the chance to meet him personally.

    Landy

    PS My build has his name on the barrel.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    MD eastern shore
    Posts
    921
    Landy:

    Bill went so far as to cover the labels on his "adhesives" so a visitor did not know what was in the can/bottle/jar.

    A quick story: When Calfee came out with his "first" book, the paper back one, I bought 2. One for me and one for Bill. This was during the time Bill was very ill, but before his relapse. I never got to give it to him. What I expected would happen if I had was he would throw it in the corner with a scowl on his face, then when he was alone he would retrieve it and absorb every word. I told this to Inez and she laughed so hard I thought she would collapse. She of course knew him better than I, but evidently I nailed that one.

    A semi glue in still has the action screws in the rifle. A full glue in does not. The one on this thread appears to be a semi, particularly as I don't see any means to get the trigger out without pulling the stock.

    Too bad you did not get to meet Bill. Your were both made out of the same mold. Laurie and Inez would have been quite the pair! I sure do miss those times. bob

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    71
    Evelio, I'll shoot you a PM to discuss this rifle a bit more. The rifle appears in good enough shape to get my feet wet this Summer but might send to you over the Winter to give it a once over and inspect the chamber/barrel. At this point I'm not touching the damaged bolt as it will just make the next person's job that much harder.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    upstate, N.Y.
    Posts
    2,745
    One final thought. Bill was a sharp guy and I doubt he would epoxy the trigger guard eliminating the capacity to extract the trigger if needed.
    It may very well be in there via friction or silicone, my bet if you pull/wiggle it, it will come free showing glue between action and sleeve.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    51
    Its important to know and have data on the place you test. We test at one outdoor place and have alot of targets shot there. Some places are not capable of consistent 2350 cards with the best ammo.
    Todd

  6. #21
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by todde View Post
    Its important to know and have data on the place you test. We test at one outdoor place and have alot of targets shot there. Some places are not capable of consistent 2350 cards with the best ammo.
    Todd
    Now that is some critical information there! Excellent post Todd. My club, not a match club, is very much a bitch to shoot a good card at. I only do serious testing and tuning there very early in the morning when the wind is almost nonexistent. You wait too long when the wind picks up, and 4-5 flags will all be pointed in different directions and my two up/down flags will be one up and one down. How do you get good data with that going on?

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    51
    We are lucky to have a concrete bench and a place we can shoot night and day at home but its not a real easy place to shoot. We try to keep up with weather forecast to plan testing. Sometimes the weather don't corporate and we feel like we need to test ammo for time reasons. That's when we have to fall back on notes. We tested ammo this evening in not so good conditions but the conditions were common so we had notes on ammo we had bought before. When we first started, Tim Miller told me to always have a control lot to compare while testing. A lot that you know well so you can gauge your test lots. This is some of the best advice we have got.
    Scott buddy I feel your pain. Our local range is the same way. Flags in all directions. Its burmed on all sides and is like a mixing bowl. If we waited on shooting 2350 here we would never buy ammo. Haha.
    Todd

  8. #23
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    106
    Todd,
    Yep, berms......the scourge of the RFBR earth!! My club has 15' right and left berms on a narrow 9 bench range. 4-1/2' berm at 50, same at 100, same at 150 and then a dogleg out to 200 with a steady slope up to about 80' feet for the 200 back stop. Topographical nightmare. I hate to pick the good wind days, but for testing there, you have to. Mixing bowl is an appropriate definition!

    I will take note of Tim's advise on a 'benchmark' lot. I appreciate you sharing that. BTW: Please give Tad my congrats on a fine performance at that club tournament.

    Later my friend.....Scott
    Last edited by doclu60; 05-21-2020 at 06:27 PM.

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