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Thread: HOkayyy, test video

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis.J View Post
    Al, Butch, Jackie, Mike B and Gene I am sitting here thinking and wondering if a Coaxial indicator can be used to dial in the chamber and throat. I have one that reads to .0002 and what is it that I may be missing about it not being able to be used for that long reach purpose?
    A coax indicator is the wrong tool for the job. Coax indicators are to be used in a spindle to check location in relation to a stationary feature. Also, most of the coax indicators dial marks are not really representative of an actual dimension. I think on my Blake, each tic mark is supposed to represent "around" .0005" of axis offset when sweeping a 2" hole/boss. In reality, you are not measuring with them, rather just looking for movement.

    Now if you want to align your tailstock or reamer, they aren't too bad.

    I have a video showing mine in use but I need to get it uploaded somewhere I can share it from. I'll try to do that later.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    I expected to see a younger man, for some reason. Did you see my question on your tuner weights?

    Thanks,

    Pete
    I wss told "if you can make it to 50 without growing up...YOU DON'T HAVE TO!!!"

    I took it to heart.

    I did get yer missive.

    I don't know. I made three "middle-sized ones" to weigh exactly as much as my Ezell and don't remember, I'll pop off some others and weigh when I can

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis.J View Post
    Thanks Gene not being one who believes there any stupid questions why not ask what comes to mind to those you trust and thank you for your input. I have used the steady rest approach rifle shoots good. Through the headstock dialing in both ends using guage pins rifles shoot good. Now time to try something I have not yet tried dialing in the throat. I don't have a long reach indicator I can get one and that's what prompted my question. In my own head by dialing it in 360 I could also use the tail stock to push the reamer straight in after being drilled and bored. I have always strived to reach perfection with everything I do. So I have always picked the minds of those who have already reached the place I want to take myself too.
    The problem with using the tailstock (though it may not be a problem) is that any misalignment between tailstock and spindle persists. You can put something in the spindle and dial it to zero runout, but any difference between the spindle center of rotation and the tailstock is still there. No amount of workholding adjustment will ever change that (the work must rotate on the same center as the spindle). Which leads to the tailstock. The tailstock might be right in line with the spinde, in which case Bob's your uncle and you're on your merry way. But, most likely your tailstock is not perfectly aligned with your spindle (darnit!) and it's probably high by a thou or two. (mine is several thousandths high). There are some convolutions you can go to - modifying your tailstock, torquing it to a locked position with a torque wrench (not a guarantee - but if it makes you feel good...), or using your headstock, dialed in, to drill and ream a center for tailstock operations. There are also expensive tailstock offset adapters (the astute viewer will note one in the Gordy video...) but they must be offest in distance AND direction to really fix the problem. IMO, most of those 'adjustments' are not worth it. Yep (comin' out of the closet) I use a (JGS) floating reamer holder...

    Don't discount your own experience. I've cut chambers in the worst of ways and ended up with shooters (though probably not by benchrest standards), but there are too many variables to nail down for anyone to say "this is the one true way to cut an accurate chamber". A lot of folks claim that, but it's statistically impractical to prove. IMO, you get a barrel, of whatever quality, and things can only go downhill from there. You use technique X or Y to cut the chamber and it shoots or it doesn't - that doesn't prove a thing about technique X or Y - it's that barrel, and your implementation of the technique, and *luck*. You could have the wrong technique entirely, but implement it badly and end up accidentally cutting a perfect chamber. It likely wouldn't ever happen again, but it's possible. The point is, any particular result isn't really proof or indictment of any method - there are just too many variables to score. Chambering theory is just that - theory. If it were established science you would see everyone here agreeing that "XXX" is the only right way to chamber a barrel.

    BTW, because you've mentioned my name, I want to note, I'm not an expert. I'm an explorer, just like you. The day I can cut three consecutive barrels that all shoot "teens" I'll let you know (trust me, you won't miss the announcement!),

  4. #34
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    Common sense does prevail Gene but often times it is not the same and thanks for sharing what you just did. Perfection is what I think we all try to strive for and by the life of me no matter how fast I run to try and catch up to it. It is has always been at least one step ahead of me. And with that being said I will never give up trying!
    Last edited by Louis.J; 02-11-2020 at 06:57 PM.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis.J View Post
    ..........Perfection is what I think we all try to strive for and by the life of me no matter how fast I run to try and catch up to it.........
    Be careful what'cha' wish for



    I pour concrete for a living.

    Each day we strive for "the perfect job" to little avail.

    We once had a perfect day, perfect service and we got lucky....... we poured down $35,000.00 worth of exposed aggregate stairs/walks/patios in "Windsor" brown agate-rock aggregate with "Adobe" integral color...... a part of the concrete work on a million dollar renovation/upgrade to a home.

    We did a perfect job, FINALLY!

    """Now all we gotta' do is clean 'er up, wrap up and smile......."""

    5 days later after pressure-wash/muriatic acid-wash/high gloss sealer the job it were GLEAMING in thee sun, we were so proud.

    The couple came home from vacation in Italy just as we were getting the last of the plastic masking rolled up.

    Lady walked out, said "hi," walked around with pursed lips and went inside.


    She came out to get her mail and I caught her, "Ma'am, what do you think?"

    "It looks like SH!T"

    "huh?"

    "It looks like I bought it at Walmart and rolled it out on the ground!"

  6. #36
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    Ouch ! I have setup, poured and finished my share of concrete often times on knee boards and a comment like would have really hurt.

  7. #37
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    Quite common, actually

    I once had an architect draw a set of plans for my dream home. The plans looked fine but when he brought a model of it he had put together, I hated it. This is the problem with building out of one's head.

    Pete

  8. #38
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    Yep we used to build custom homes for the wealthy and they changed their minds like I changed my socks everyday. On one occasion the wife thought the windows in the front were to small. So we made them bigger and to the size she wanted and as soon as she saw the new opening she said it looked Hokay and said put them back the way they were. Keep in mind the house was already framed a fully sheathed with plywood and not an easy change to make.
    What was nice we were just a three man crew and once we broke ground we never left until they were handed the keys. We did it all from laying out the house on the lot, forming and pouring the stemwalls, the framing, the inside finish work, including hanging all of the doors, hand cutting in all of the hinges, knobs and lock sets and the list goes. Including all of the outside concrete flat work. The typical job would take around eighteen months and we were there everyday from the start to finish.
    Last edited by Louis.J; 02-12-2020 at 06:51 PM.

  9. #39
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    Couple yrs ago we were pouring a retaining wall on a large home. One section faced the pool, 65ft long X 10ft tall of wall showing, enormous footings..... over $30,000.00



    We set down with the owners and drew up a bunch of "cant strip" joints, crack control etc..... and they said "GO"



    We poured it, and she said "NO"


    Me, Husband, Wife, and General Contractor standing there......


    GC says OK, so it's coming out?


    "yep"


    "Can I SHOOT IT?"


    "yep"


    416Wby, 416 Taylor, 375....... He was dead serious, brought in his collection of big guns......... He had some fun.......


    He also whacked it with a 30-06, just for comparison.



    Then tore it out and we repoured it. We got paid twice.

  10. #40
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    Mar 2016
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    Al, I greatly appreciate your videos and the time it takes to do it. On your Gordy sequence you have some out-of-round stuff with the fireform barrel. Can you talk about the weirdness one gets when the bushing spins, then catches, then spins.....
    Iíve done experiments with spinning bushings and captive bushings. They arenít necessarily round or ground perfectly......
    Thoughts..

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shooter71 View Post
    Al, I greatly appreciate your videos and the time it takes to do it. On your Gordy sequence you have some out-of-round stuff with the fireform barrel. Can you talk about the weirdness one gets when the bushing spins, then catches, then spins.....
    Iíve done experiments with spinning bushings and captive bushings. They arenít necessarily round or ground perfectly......
    Thoughts..

    IN MY OPINION...... that's not what was happening in the video. I think that barrel is just worn, out of round as in tops knocked off the lands and the bushing is washing around. Remember, the bushing was TIGHT, then loosened up as it passed the firecracked area.

    I've never seen it before but this is the first used, worn out barrel I've Gordy'd.

    It was a mistake, misleading.

    I've got a new barrel in the lathe right now, hoping to do it tomorrow #1 with a warmed up lathe, and #2, definitely with the new barrel.

    BTW, I've got a new vid up where I'm using the FF bbl, it's very dark, late evening, I hope to also redo that one tomorrow

  12. #42
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    I didnít think that was happening either, Iíve seen it in barrels getting rechambered. Just was wondering if youíve seen weirdness related to bushing rotation. Iíd rather a bushing not rotate. With a weight-biased rod you get a better transfer off bottom, if that makes sense. If a bushing was dead-nuts ground and round, thatís different. Iíll check out the new videos as they come out. Really enjoying them.

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shooter71 View Post
    .....If a bushing was dead-nuts ground and round, thatís different........
    The bushings I'm using are reamer bushings, sized per tenths of thousandths, ground and fitted to a ground fitted rod per Herr Kiff & Kompany

    http://pacifictoolandgauge.com/grizz...al-to-6mm.html

  14. #44
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    I have one of Kiff's rods

    I think it's called a range rod. It has slop between the bushing and the rod itself so there is a bit of droop. I didn't like that idea much so I use pins on both ends of the barrel. I indicate both of them to zero using a tenth test indicator once I have zeroed it with a dial indicator. To me, that is a good way to do a chamber. Likely, most of the methods for setting up a barrel to chamber work just fine. I think one has to do what they believe is right and go with it. That's what matters in the end. Once i have completed the chamber, I flip the barrel and crown it, using pins in both ends again.

    Pete

  15. #45
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    Same way I have been doing it Pete for quite sometime. But I am also a firm believer there is always a better approach to doing things. I have a blank on the way dialing in the chamber and the throat makes allot of common sense to me. And just importantly going back to check your work to see if it did or did not work. Myself I what to learn to understand why either way.

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