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Thread: Greetings from a New Member - Beginning my journey to building my own Rifle

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    564
    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    The Grizzly cannot be stopped.
    Swap in a 3-phase motor and a VFD to feed it.

    It really is an outstanding safety feature.

    It does work better with a geared drive, but is still reasonably effective on a belt system.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    152
    There's a bunch of videos on Youtube done by an old guy that goes by Viper, those can be real helpful, his cutting oil is very good also. You can also buy Gordy Gritters video, it's good to have too. I had about a 35 year gap in my lathe use history and after buying one to use discovered I'd forgot pretty much everything I knew from back in the day. After chambering a few barrels and doing some odd jobs I realized I didn't know jack about tools, feeds, speeds and all those details that experienced machinists know, guys like Jackie. So I looked around and found a Community College near my home and took a basic machining class that was mostly lathe work and very little on mills. It was taught by a retired Aerospace machinist that started his career as a general machinist on manual machines. That guy taught me all kinds of stuff that isn't in any book I've ever seen that has helped me progress really fast. Best $900 I ever spent!

  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Orcutt, CA
    Posts
    17
    I have a grizzly G4003G and while it’s a good lathe and produces outstanding shooting rifles. If I had to do it all over again I would buy a precision Mathews lathe. The grizzly needed to have rubber motor mounts fabricated to stop the single phase motor from transmitting vibration into my lathe. Also I built mounts on the legs/stand for level feet and widen the foot print of the lathe. Adding DRO was a big help for me and is well worth the money. I never took any classes and am 100% self taught. Read machining books and trying different setups is how I found what works me.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Texas Panhandle
    Posts
    1,953
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    As many will attest to on this Site, I am a Machinist, and I feel like anyone with a fair amount of mechanical ability and common sense can learn to do barrel work.

    The best piece of advice I can give you while not actually teaching you in person is to NOT just learn HOW to do things, but also learn WHY you do things a certain way.

    In general terms I call this “basic machine shop practice”.

    When you learn WHY things are done a certain way, that opens the door to all possibilities.
    That's the best statement that I've seen. I've been building some powder measures for the past few years that use an insert similar to what Jerry Hensler used to make. Those things have sure taught me a lot of the why's and why it's better to do some operations first and others later.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    76
    I made a similar post a year or two ago. I'm not a competitor and just like shooting rifles and hunting. The only lathe experience I had was on an Atlas 618 I was using to make bamboo fly rods. I've never taken a class either. A class would probably save you money not having to throw away material as you teach yourself what doesn't work.

    As Jackie said, learn why you're doing what you're doing. Everything I've read online is made to look like you have to do it a particular way or it's wrong. It's not so. It's like dog training (which I do a lot). There are a multitude of ways to get good results. Try one. If you don't like it try another. Trying all the different ways will eventually lead you to a process that works for you and yields good results.

    I did my first few on a South Bend 10K between centers. I then decided I wanted to try the "best" method, in the headstock, and ended up with a Precision Matthews 1340GT with VFD. It's very nice machine but hasn't produced a better shooting rifle than the ones I did between centers.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    63

    Barrel Fitting and Chambering Instruction?

    I'm interested in barrel work and have pretty much all the equipment and tooling one could possibly want. I inherited a very nicely setup and fully functioinal Clausing 5914 with many chucks, cutters, tool holders, dial indicators and reamers. My wife's father was a well known benchrest barrel man but wasn't into sharing his knowledge till it was too late. I was looking for some instruction on setting up a barrel in the lathe and performing the necessary operations correctly. I've actually done a few barrels myself already, but getting the best setup still eludes me. I also inherited dozens of barrels, both blanks and premium benchrest takeoffs. I understand Gordy Gritters was doing some teaching but his website has not been updated in several years. Is he still doing those programs? I heard a rumor that there were some others providing hands on instruction and would appreciate any information that might be current. Because of my other work, enrolling in a gunsmithing class at a community college would be impractical, but spending a few days in the shop of a good teacher would be a good place to start.

    Funny, but my father in law thought very little of Gordy's practices. He had been doing this work for decades and multiple hundreds of barrels and was quite set in his ways. Very suspicious of information from the internet. I'm on the West Coast but high in the mountains, away from most of the lunacy. I would be happy to travel for the right opportunity.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    76
    Gordy does do training. He will even come to your shop and show you on your equipment. He sends emails about his classes. I'm not sure how I got on that email distribution, though. If you want to do that I suggest calling him.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Poetry, Tex.
    Posts
    6,632
    Quote Originally Posted by RCE1 View Post
    I'm interested in barrel work and have pretty much all the equipment and tooling one could possibly want. I inherited a very nicely setup and fully functioinal Clausing 5914 with many chucks, cutters, tool holders, dial indicators and reamers. My wife's father was a well known benchrest barrel man but wasn't into sharing his knowledge till it was too late. I was looking for some instruction on setting up a barrel in the lathe and performing the necessary operations correctly. I've actually done a few barrels myself already, but getting the best setup still eludes me. I also inherited dozens of barrels, both blanks and premium benchrest takeoffs. I understand Gordy Gritters was doing some teaching but his website has not been updated in several years. Is he still doing those programs? I heard a rumor that there were some others providing hands on instruction and would appreciate any information that might be current. Because of my other work, enrolling in a gunsmithing class at a community college would be impractical, but spending a few days in the shop of a good teacher would be a good place to start.

    Funny, but my father in law thought very little of Gordy's practices. He had been doing this work for decades and multiple hundreds of barrels and was quite set in his ways. Very suspicious of information from the internet. I'm on the West Coast but high in the mountains, away from most of the lunacy. I would be happy to travel for the right opportunity.


    Sounds if your FIL was a very smart guy.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by Butch Lambert View Post
    Sounds if your FIL was a very smart guy.
    I believe him to have been one of the few geniuses I've known in my life. His interests were very narrow, but incredibly deep.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Poetry, Tex.
    Posts
    6,632
    Quote Originally Posted by RCE1 View Post
    I believe him to have been one of the few geniuses I've known in my life. His interests were very narrow, but incredibly deep.


    I can believe that!

    Check your private messages.

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