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Thread: How many have machined a flat on the bottom of a Rem action?

  1. #1
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    How many have machined a flat on the bottom of a Rem action?

    I saw a post where someone claimed rems twist in the stock and hurt the bedding. Iíve never experienced this but it made me curious if someone had. Thanks

  2. #2
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    I haven't done it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    I saw a post where someone claimed rems twist in the stock and hurt the bedding. Iíve never experienced this but it made me curious if someone had. Thanks
    ...but I think the first thing is to establish if there's really a problem. There're lots of round actions in competition and critical applications and adding a flat bottom would be an easy thing to do if the round bottom were really a problem. The fact that others haven't done it is the first thing to make me doubt that it's a problem. Someone wise-ish once said to me "Look for problems to solve, not solutions in search of a problem".

    GsT

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneT View Post
    ...but I think the first thing is to establish if there's really a problem. There're lots of round actions in competition and critical applications and adding a flat bottom would be an easy thing to do if the round bottom were really a problem. The fact that others haven't done it is the first thing to make me doubt that it's a problem. Someone wise-ish once said to me "Look for problems to solve, not solutions in search of a problem".

    GsT
    ^^^^^

  4. #4
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    Yes, it's a solution in search of a problem.

    While there is rotational momentum, the 'lever' applying the momentum is only the radius of the bullet.

    Archimedes had it figured out all those years ago (287 BC - 212 BC):

    ďGive me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world. Ē -Archimedes
    Last edited by Al Nyhus; 01-12-2020 at 09:45 PM.

  5. #5
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    Check mraps other posts.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneT View Post
    ...but I think the first thing is to establish if there's really a problem. There're lots of round actions in competition and critical applications and adding a flat bottom would be an easy thing to do if the round bottom were really a problem. The fact that others haven't done it is the first thing to make me doubt that it's a problem. Someone wise-ish once said to me "Look for problems to solve, not solutions in search of a problem".

    GsT
    Thanks Gene. It was on a different forum and he is a high power shooter that was making the claim. Heís been doing it for a long time so I assumed he had support for the statement. Thatís why I asked you guys.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Nyhus View Post
    Yes, it's a solution in search of a problem.

    While there is rotational momentum, the 'lever' applying the momentum is only the radius of the bullet.

    Archimedes had it figured out all those years ago (287 BC - 212 BC):

    ďGive me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world. Ē -Archimedes
    Great example. Thanks

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    Butch, I didnít read your post since you canít be trusted I need more time to mend our friendship.

  9. #9
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    Also, would there be any advantage to putting a small flat where the pillar touches the front action screw hole? Or should I simply radius the pillars?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    Also, would there be any advantage to putting a small flat where the pillar touches the front action screw hole? Or should I simply radius the pillars?
    Having tried it several ways, the only thing I'm certain of is that I don't want any pillar in direct contact with the action. I like to see a minimum of .030-ish of bedding material on top of the pillars. -Al

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Nyhus View Post
    Having tried it several ways, the only thing I'm certain of is that I don't want any pillar in direct contact with the action. I like to see a minimum of .030-ish of bedding material on top of the pillars. -Al
    That is new to me. Thanks. I assumed we wanted the action screws, pillars and action to be one solid unit.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    That is new to me. Thanks. I assumed we wanted the action screws, pillars and action to be one solid unit.
    Well, that's worthy of another whole thread. -Al

  13. #13
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    A couple of decades back, when I was lucky enough to have a long and informative phone conversation with George Kelbly, we discussed pillar bedding, and he told me that way back when it was first used they discovered that accuracy was better if there was at least a thin layer of bedding over the tops of aluminum pillars.

    Some of you may not know that perfectly good pillar bedding can be done with pillars that are cast in place using something like Devcon aluminum putty. Of course the depth will create a shrinkage issue that is properly dealt with by dong a skim bedding job over the top using a more fluid material.

    In the past, I have installed pillars using the action as a fixture, only gluing them in position in the stock. I put a spacer between the pillars and the action and once the pillars were in place, simply did a good bedding job for the whole action including the tops of the pillars. It has been a long time since I have done one, but I think that the method would work just fine today. Added a little later: Those pillars were made by a friend and at my request the halves were the usual diameter to be able to be hid under a trigger guard and escutcheon, but about half way up they stepped up to a diameter that was just small enough to be covered by the tang in back, and quite a bit bigger than that in the front. When I used his mill to inlet the stock for them, I cut a wide channel that extended from the front of the front pillar to the recoil lug mortise to tie them together.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boyd Allen View Post
    A couple of decades back, when I was lucky enough to have a long and informative phone conversation with George Kelbly, we discussed pillar bedding, and he told me that way back when it was first used they discovered that accuracy was better if there was at least a thin layer of bedding over the tops of aluminum pillars.

    Some of you may not know that perfectly good pillar bedding can be done with pillars that are cast in place using something like Devcon aluminum putty. Of course the depth will create a shrinkage issue that is properly dealt with by dong a skim bedding job over the top using a more fluid material.

    In the past, I have installed pillars using the action as a fixture, only gluing them in position in the stock. I put a spacer between the pillars and the action and once the pillars were in place, simply did a good bedding job for the whole action including the tops of the pillars. It has been a long time since I have done one, but I think that the method would work just fine today. Added a little later: Those pillars were made by a friend and at my request the halves were the usual diameter to be able to be hid under a trigger guard and escutcheon, but about half way up they stepped up to a diameter that was just small enough to be covered by the tang in back, and quite a bit bigger than that in the front. When I used his mill to inlet the stock for them, I cut a wide channel that extended from the front of the front pillar to the recoil lug mortise to tie them together.
    Very cool, Sir! Thanks for taking the time to explain. Iíll give it a try on the next one.

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