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Thread: Disposing of Live Primers

  1. #1
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    Disposing of Live Primers

    This is a topic which brings about a lot of discussion on how to do it. For the record, the following methods DO NOT WORK:
    • Soaking the primer in oil, and;
    • Soaking the primer in water.

    Chemical neutralization of the priming compound is the only reliable way to neutralize a primer. From the book "Ammunition Making", the process for disposing live primer material is by using a hot (50-60* C), strong solution of sodium hydroxide and acetic acid. (Drain cleaner and vinegar, respectively.) A safe process, if chemical controls are in place, but not to be done on a whim.

    BTW, the book is available for online reading, or for download at https://archive.org/details/Ammuniti...st1990/page/n3. Used copies of the book (it is out of print) are available for purchase - about $80 a copy. (See https://www.amazon.com/Ammunition-ma.../dp/0935998578)

    Hope this helps.

  2. #2
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    load and pull the trigger is the only practical way for the average shooter.

    thanks for the post ASA.

  3. #3
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    Why do you want to dispose of them?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsmithsr View Post
    load and pull the trigger is the only practical way for the average shooter.
    Quote Originally Posted by antelopedundee View Post
    Why do you want to dispose of them?
    Not all primers are correctly seated in casings. How does one load a deformed one into an unmodified casing? The only other option is to burn the primers - carefully. Primers in a fire have the ability to penetrate thin layers of aluminum foil. A steel can (such as a 10 or 12 ounce canned food container) works to prevent flight of the primer cups, but care must be taken to avoid packing too many primers in the can.
    Last edited by Asa Yam; 01-02-2020 at 04:04 PM.

  5. #5
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    LISSEN to Asa..... man speaks truth.... primers are H A R D to kill!!

    (except when you don't want to.... the tiniest trace of residual wax in a case neck will cause a misfire in the middle of a Match)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Asa Yam View Post
    Not all primers are correctly seated in casings. How does one load a deformed one into an unmodified casing? The only other option is to burn the primers - carefully. Primers in a fire have the ability to penetrate thin layers of aluminum foil. A steel can (such as a 10 or 12 ounce canned food container) works to prevent flight of the primer cups, but care must be taken to avoid packing too many primers in the can.
    Will also penetrate skin. Have one in my abdomen to prove it. Too deep to easily remove. Doc thought it best to leave. Be careful out there!!

    Rick

  7. #7
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    Dig a hole in an appropriate place and bury them.

  8. #8
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    Primers

    I didn't read the link in the OP post. Forgive me. Just curious. How do you know they're all dead, once soaked in a chemical solution.

    If I ever end up with a bunch of primers that I need to dispose of. I like the suggestion of digging a hole and dump them in. May get real anal and plant a tomato plant on top.


    Glenn

  9. #9
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    Lightbulb Soometimes you just have to think outside the box!

    Quote Originally Posted by Asa Yam View Post
    Chemical neutralization of the priming compound is the only reliable way to neutralize a primer. From the book "Ammunition Making", the process for disposing live primer material is by using a hot (50-60* C), strong solution of sodium hydroxide and acetic acid. (Drain cleaner and vinegar, respectively.) A safe process, if chemical controls are in place, but not to be done on a whim.
    What do you do with this stuff when you are through with it? If it were me, I would just through the primers away and go worry about something else.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chism G View Post
    I didn't read the link in the OP post. Forgive me. Just curious. How do you know they're all dead, once soaked in a chemical solution.

    If I ever end up with a bunch of primers that I need to dispose of. I like the suggestion of digging a hole and dump them in. May get real anal and plant a tomato plant on top.


    Glenn
    Glenn, You have a good idea. But if you have a bunch of primers you might want to bury each one in its own hole. Maybe ten feet away from any other primer just to be safe.

  11. #11
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    Yup, planting them individually several inches apart works a treat.


    VERY safe....


    Wh'in I was jus' a younker this happened a lot to us...... BUCKETS of dysfunctional primers...... we'uns would set around nights shuckin' army munitions and reclaiming the brass so's Ma could could go get us taters and keep Dad in ci'gars.

    We taken them buckets out and dumped 'em right on in that thar' Brillion't Corn Drill and Pa would whu'p up 'em out and run 'em thru the corn field, dead a' winter......


    Shore' nuff, come fall, the corn tasted pre-salted, kindofa' sharp taste at the back'a yer tongue......but Dad said it got an exter $20.00/jug of an evening, so it all paid off in the end.

    Ahhhh, them dewy mornings and misty days......firefly evenin's and settin' around the potbelly singin' 'Mazin' Grace.....

    life was simpler then

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Wynne View Post
    Glenn, You have a good idea. But if you have a bunch of primers you might want to bury each one in its own hole. Maybe ten feet away from any other primer just to be safe.

    Good one Bill. Now Iím going to end up with a tomato patch instead of a plant



    Glenn

  13. #13
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    Here in Australia, there are State authorities who dispose of unwanted explosive & munitions - we found these in Uncle George's garage when he passed on.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kielly View Post
    Here in Australia, there are State authorities who dispose of unwanted explosive & munitions - we found these in Uncle George's garage when he passed on.

    Ohhh we have that service here too.... but wouldn't THINK of using it. Just ain't in our collective psyche

  15. #15
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    I think Al should write a Erskine Caldwell style novel on the order of "Tobacco Road" or "God's Little Acre".

    Makes me wonder, would the mash run faster if you threw in a hundred CCI BR-4's?

    Just don't run it through an old Buick radiator, least not if you want your customers to be around to buy another jug.

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