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Thread: Disposing of Live Primers

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Arizona
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    4
    "......hot (50-60* C), strong solution of sodium hydroxide and acetic acid. (Drain cleaner and vinegar, respectively.) "

    This is a strong acid and a strong base. Mixing, especially at high temperature, is a bad idea.

    Where I used to work we made ejection seats, we disposed of 1000's of primers, always by burning in a steel box.
    Most places the fire department will take small quantities

    M

  2. #17
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    Dec 2003
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    washington.........STATE that is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MClark View Post
    "......hot (50-60* C), strong solution of sodium hydroxide and acetic acid. (Drain cleaner and vinegar, respectively.) "

    This is a strong acid and a strong base. Mixing, especially at high temperature, is a bad idea.

    Where I used to work we made ejection seats, we disposed of 1000's of primers, always by burning in a steel box.
    Most places the fire department will take small quantities

    M
    Exactly.... 'cept here on Redneck Heaven the answer to everything (paint cans, fireworks displays, reloading room refuse, shop debris, empty automotive cleaners/degreasers/ethers/esthers/etc) is "throw it in the burn pile"............ after all the old tires filled with refuse oil burn down of course

    No "steel box"

    My kids (all 8 of them) learned at an early age that the burn pile is to be fed in spurts and starts, preferably from the tractor bucket


    Quote Originally Posted by MClark View Post
    Most places the fire department will take small quantities

    M
    Exactly.... the FD's here do the same thing. And they take them out and burn 'em

    Here in WA it's right out in the open... the state can burn anything. Tires, oily debris, no problem. The approved dumpsites burn 24-7 and even the landfills burn a lot of stuff but the average HOMEOWNER??? He gets caught burning a ROOFING SHINGLE he better be a smooth talker, or really good at dumb........

    And contractors?? Home Builders? Anyone in the trades??? You burn a friggin' paint rag in a pile of clean lumber, they find a tincan hulk in a pile of slash......."Busted".....

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
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    Find a scrap piece of pipe about an inch in diameter and a couple feet long. Get another piece of pipe a little longer and smaller in diameter that you can cap at one end and have it fit inside the first pipe. Put a primer anvil side down on a brick. Put one end of the larger pipe over the primer and use the second pipe to whack the primer until it fires. Lather, rinse repeat.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,301

    Disposing of Live Primers

    Nobody seems to be concerned about the live and spent primers that get dumped in the trash cans following cleanup after a match. I imagine ,quite a few. Especially after the big matches.

    Some competitors have been known to search the trash cans for recyclables, like brass, dirty patches, etc. Loading areas that have dirt/gravel floors are littered with old primers, bullets.

    I havenít noticed any special precautions to address the live primer issue, except for a scheduled trip to a neighborhood dump site.

    Maybe I missed something



    Glenn

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Poetry, Tex.
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    6,500
    I keep a fire burn area on front of our property. Mainly for tree and bush burning. Got rid a of a few (987) primers in the fire. We didn't hang around not knowing what would happen, not much. Kinda like putting a box of 22RF in there.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    360
    I do the same as Butch with the burn pile toward the back of the property and behind the 100 yard berm, putting that at about 250 yards from the back fence. I throw primers, live and spent, in the brush pile there. Iíve never had any incidents. And when I was a Detroit Fire Fighter I never heard of or saw anyone turning in primers. In Detroit they shootíem.
    While at Engine 60 we had a midnight run to a place where someone had perform an asbestos removal but the problem was thy left the bags of asbestos behind. No one knew the procedure so the Chief said put it on the engine and take back to the fire house. Huh?? We set the bags back of the firehouse. The next day the old pass the buck started. Public Works didnít want it. EPA didnít want them. No one knew what to do. So I put them in the dumpster and that morning the garbage truck took it. Two weeks later denials took place. No one knew nothing. EPA had comeback to dispose of the stuff with an air tight truck. The Chief didnít know where they were. The Captain didnít know where they went. The Lieutenant didnít know and I sure as hell knew nothing. I guess I live recklessly.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
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    Was it Hatcher claimed a woman was killed when the primer of a live round exited a furnace when she had the door open?

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Branchville, NJ
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    499
    Not Hatcher. We duplicated his testing of live rounds in a fire, remotely set off a 7.62mm M80 round and had nothing penetrate a cardboard surround. Caught it all on High Speed video.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Carrollton Mo.
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    366

    old primers

    Put me in the burn column. I live out in the country. Burn my trash in a fencerow. Ive burnt old powder,primers. Sometimes it makes a little thud but it aint compressed enough to bang. Doug

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    360
    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    LISSEN to Asa..... man speaks truth.... primers are H A R D to kill!!

    (except when you don't want to.... the tiniest trace of residual wax in a case neck will cause a misfire in the middle of a Match)
    I just have to ask the question; How does the tiniest trace of residual wax about an inch and a half away from the primer cause the misfire?

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    ME
    Posts
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    I'm wondering too

    Quote Originally Posted by FBecigneul View Post
    I just have to ask the question; How does the tiniest trace of residual wax about an inch and a half away from the primer cause the misfire?
    Francis. Keep me posted.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    322
    Excavate a small hole in Mother Earth.
    Dump primers into hole w/ a small amount of accelerator.
    Ignite safely.
    When smoke subsides.
    Back fill hole in Mother Earth.

    Walk away

  13. #28
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    Dec 2003
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    washington.........STATE that is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kielly View Post
    Was it Hatcher claimed a woman was killed when the primer of a live round exited a furnace when she had the door open?
    My 1st cousin was hit by a primer.

    Early '70's, guys had been in and out hunting, somehow a box of "7MM Mauser" (7◊57, .275 Rigby) got set too close to the wood cookstove, probably on the rack over the warming oven

    She was wearing a dress. the primer "stuck" to/into her leg but IIRC was removed with fingers, no jackknife surgery required (and the boys were always ready)

  14. #29
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    Feb 2003
    Location
    San Angelo, Texas (West Texas)
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    1,597

    There is a lesson for all of us!

    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    My 1st cousin was hit by a primer.

    Early '70's, guys had been in and out hunting, somehow a box of "7MM Mauser" (7◊57, .275 Rigby) got set too close to the wood cookstove, probably on the rack over the warming oven

    She was wearing a dress. the primer "stuck" to/into her leg but IIRC was removed with fingers, no jackknife surgery required (and the boys were always ready)
    I am sorry to hear that. It should be a lesson to us not to put loaded cartridges on top of a wooden stove.

    Concho Bill

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    85
    and that might have been more than just the primer powering that ? as in burning powder

    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    My 1st cousin was hit by a primer.

    Early '70's, guys had been in and out hunting, somehow a box of "7MM Mauser" (7◊57, .275 Rigby) got set too close to the wood cookstove, probably on the rack over the warming oven

    She was wearing a dress. the primer "stuck" to/into her leg but IIRC was removed with fingers, no jackknife surgery required (and the boys were always ready)

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