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Thread: Good price for a Remington 37

  1. #1
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    Good price for a Remington 37

    I'm looking for input as to a fair price for a Remington 37 in very good condition.

    It was purchased in the 1960's and has been well maintained. I know what the Book of Gun Values says but I'd like to hear from the Benchrest community what they would be willing to pay for it. The guy selling it wants $600 bucks. What do you think? Good price or no?

    Thanks for your input.

  2. #2
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    lot of variables but that is a good base price.

  3. #3
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    Well these days, not much of the benchrest community would have a current interest, but as to your specific question, a well kept gun sans sights.....thats a very fair price.
    Anything that vintage, however, I would urge somebody with a borescope to verify the bore, lot of potential for possible cleaning rod damage.....better to be safe.

  4. #4
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    I'm down from 5 Mod37s to 3. Is it a numbers matching rifle including the stock? Hope the receiver is not drilled and tapped and has original sights. $500-$1000 depending on a lot of things.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butch Lambert View Post
    I'm down from 5 Mod37s to 3. Is it a numbers matching rifle including the stock? Hope the receiver is not drilled and tapped and has original sights. $500-$1000 depending on a lot of things.
    How much do you think a drilled and tapped receiver might impact the value of a Mod37 priced at $600 given that everything else about the gun is in very good condition (bore, barrel crown, stock etc.) ?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJV View Post
    How much do you think a drilled and tapped receiver might impact the value of a Mod37 priced at $600 given that everything else about the gun is in very good condition (bore, barrel crown, stock etc.) ?

    Quite a lot I'm afraid.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJV View Post
    How much do you think a drilled and tapped receiver might impact the value of a Mod37 priced at $600 given that everything else about the gun is in very good condition (bore, barrel crown, stock etc.) ?
    Howdy TJV,
    Tim gave you solid advice above. If everything checks out excellent, you have to decide if you want it as a shooter or a collector piece. If a collector piece then the receiver being drilled and tapped is irreversible and collectors frown on these things.

    As a shooter......these rifles have the ability to be quite surprising. The advantage of the receiver being drilled and tapped is you can use a modern scope. However, it’s possible to get a barrel mounted scope base that works with modern scopes. If you like old barrel mounted scopes, and some are pretty good, these can be had for vintage rifles.

    https://www.gunbroker.com/item/844620554

    The linked rifle is not mine, and I’m not associated with it in any way. If I were right handed I’d be tempted by that if I didn’t already have some 37’s. Collectors won’t be swarming on it because of the changes, but they can be reversed if you choose to chase parts......an expensive and aggravating game.

    Front sight is not a problem.

    Single shot magazine can be had from Steve Earle Products for $95ish and are as good as the originals without entering the collector market to pay for an overpriced single shot adapter.

    A better buttplate assembly can be had if you are a position shooter. I have an excellent Anschutz 1413 International Free rifle. One of my 37’s outshoots it. I suspect the other will too, have not shot it yet. To be fair, both have older custom barrels, but 37 barrels were usually outstanding. The 37 was made to a high quality standard and it becomes self evident when you handle and shoot one.

    Now, for me, this would a be big selling point of this rifle over the one you are looking at. Yes, by the time you buy this rifle and pay shipping you’ll be a bit more into it......at first. This rifle has a Vaver rear sight if I recall right. You’ll have to buy front and rear sights for the one you are looking at. Rear sights are more expensive than front sights. So really, you are already ahead with this rifle.

    Now, THE BIG thing about this rifle is that it has a Canjar trigger. Those are hard to find and expensive when you do find them. I’ve seen some in the $400-600 range in the last few years. You’ll like the Canjar trigger far better than the factory trigger. All things being the same condition wise, the trigger would sell the rifle to me. That custom stock, Dunlap or another that escapes me right now, should prove comfortable. The palm rest can be sold to offset the cost of the rifle if you so choose.

    Whichever way you go with it, I think you’ll be impressed with the rifle. Shoot a wide variety of match ammo in it and you just might surprise folks with an old Remington 37.

    Take care,

    Greg
    Last edited by 404tbang; 11-14-2019 at 01:01 PM.

  8. #8
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    Rangemaster 37

    Quote Originally Posted by 404tbang View Post
    Howdy TJV,
    Tim gave you solid advice above. If everything checks out excellent, you have to decide if you want it as a shooter or a collector piece. If a collector piece then the receiver being drilled and tapped is irreversible and collectors frown on these things.

    As a shooter......these rifles have the ability to be quite surprising. The advantage of the receiver being drilled and tapped is you can use a modern scope. However, it’s possible to get a barrel mounted scope base that works with modern scopes. If you like old barrel mounted scopes, and some are pretty good, these can be had for vintage rifles.

    https://www.gunbroker.com/item/844620554

    The linked rifle is not mine, and I’m not associated with it in any way. If I were right handed I’d be tempted by that if I didn’t already have some 37’s. Collectors won’t be swarming on it because of the changes, but they can be reversed if you choose to chase parts......an expensive and aggravating game.

    Front sight is not a problem.

    Single shot magazine can be had from Steve Earle Products for $95ish and are as good as the originals without entering the collector market to pay for an overpriced single shot adapter.

    A better buttplate assembly can be had if you are a position shooter. I have an excellent Anschutz 1413 International Free rifle. One of my 37’s outshoots it. I suspect the other will too, have not shot it yet. To be fair, both have older custom barrels, but 37 barrels were usually outstanding. The 37 was made to a high quality standard and it becomes self evident when you handle and shoot one.

    Now, for me, this would a be big selling point of this rifle over the one you are looking at. Yes, by the time you buy this rifle and pay shipping you’ll be a bit more into it......at first. This rifle has a Vaver rear sight if I recall right. You’ll have to buy front and rear sights for the one you are looking at. Rear sights are more expensive than front sights. So really, you are already ahead with this rifle.

    Now, THE BIG thing about this rifle is that it has a Canjar trigger. Those are hard to find and expensive when you do find them. I’ve seen some in the $400-600 range in the last few years. You’ll like the Canjar trigger far better than the factory trigger. All things being the same condition wise, the trigger would sell the rifle to me. That custom stock, Dunlap or another that escapes me right now, should prove comfortable. The palm rest can be sold to offset the cost of the rifle if you so choose.

    Whichever way you go with it, I think you’ll be impressed with the rifle. Shoot a wide variety of match ammo in it and you just might surprise folks with an old Remington 37.

    Take care,

    Greg
    Greg.

    Thanks for the info. I bought the rifle yesterday for $600. I test fired it by shooting at a 6 inch gong at 200 meters using SK Red Box Match ammo. It was effortless. I'm going to mount a modern scope using a picatinny rail and shoot it at 50 yards. If it performs as well as it did at 200 meters, I'm a happy camper. The serial number is in the 11xxx range so I figure it was born in 1954. I've attached a photo of the barrel engravings. Any additional info that you can offer based on what is engraved?

    Thanks again for your info.
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  9. #9
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    Kentucky
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJV View Post
    Greg.

    Thanks for the info. I bought the rifle yesterday for $600. I test fired it by shooting at a 6 inch gong at 200 meters using SK Red Box Match ammo. It was effortless. I'm going to mount a modern scope using a picatinny rail and shoot it at 50 yards. If it performs as well as it did at 200 meters, I'm a happy camper. The serial number is in the 11xxx range so I figure it was born in 1954. I've attached a photo of the barrel engravings. Any additional info that you can offer based on what is engraved?

    Thanks again for your info.
    Glad you got the rifle, youre gonna love it.

    I dont know the barrel stamps, but if you go to rimfirecentral.com there is a Remington forum. There is also a Remington 37/40x subforum. The guys there can square you away on any barrel stamps.

    Enjoy your rifle!

    Greg

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJV View Post
    Greg.

    Thanks for the info. I bought the rifle yesterday for $600. I test fired it by shooting at a 6 inch gong at 200 meters using SK Red Box Match ammo. It was effortless. I'm going to mount a modern scope using a picatinny rail and shoot it at 50 yards. If it performs as well as it did at 200 meters, I'm a happy camper. The serial number is in the 11xxx range so I figure it was born in 1954. I've attached a photo of the barrel engravings. Any additional info that you can offer based on what is engraved?

    Thanks again for your info.

    Check this link to check the date on your rifle.
    http://www.remingtonowners.com/topic130.html

    They are not dated by serial number, just the month and year code on the LH side of the barrel just forward of the front ring.
    Last edited by Butch Lambert; 11-28-2019 at 11:49 AM.

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