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Thread: Savage 99 loose threads

  1. #1
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    Savage 99 loose threads

    A friend has an old Savage 99 take down that has a loose barrel threads. He wrapped some dental floss around it a couple of years ago that tightened it up for a few shots but that's all. Is there a fix for this situation? I have seen others like this one so i know it's a problem.

    Thanks,

    Pete

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    A friend has an old Savage 99 take down that has a loose barrel threads. He wrapped some dental floss around it a couple of years ago that tightened it up for a few shots but that's all. Is there a fix for this situation? I have seen others like this one so i know it's a problem.

    Thanks,

    Pete
    Pete,
    Most of these were taken apart and put back togather more times than they were ever shot. Iv'e rebarreled a few of them thru the years but they were solid frames. I don't know why you couldn't rebarrel one and make it a solid frame. The receiver and barrel had an interrupted square thread so if you cut a full thread on a new barrel it would work. The ones I did I sent the original barrels down to Douglas and had them duplicate the old barrel. I believe Savage used to do the same thing when you sent them a loose take down.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    A friend has an old Savage 99 take down that has a loose barrel threads. He wrapped some dental floss around it a couple of years ago that tightened it up for a few shots but that's all. Is there a fix for this situation? I have seen others like this one so i know it's a problem.

    Thanks,

    Pete
    Wrap it with some more Teflon tape. 3 shots should be 3 deer. Shoot some other gun for fun.

  4. #4
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    Some take down rifles had an adjustment in them for wear. It was usually in the front plate that the barrel was attached to. Possibly add some sort of shim plate here to apply pressure towards the muzzle and tighten the fit.

  5. #5
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    Thanks

    Upon closer investigation I found the receiver has a chamfer inside it's shoulder and the barrel isn't big enough around to touch the face of the action very much so over time the shoulder of the barrel has sunk into the chamfer. The barrel has uninterrupted flat threads which do not seem to be worn a whole lot.

    I stuck one together years ago with green locktite and it has held but hasn't been shot a lot. I peaned the metal back into the barrels shoulder of this one so the barrel is now proud of closing a bit. I thought I would try tightening it until the forend key lines up and blue locktite it. I will tell him not to take it apart again. I am cleaning the barrel which has many years of lead, yes lead, carbon and copper in it. The barrel has a good throat and generally is in good shape, having some of the original chatter marks from rifling when it was new and no rust pits, which is remarkable I think. I intend to lap it lightly just to smooth some of faults up a bit. I use those felt plugs on their mandrill with 180 clover so it goes quickly. The felt plugs can easily be tightened by twisting the rod so it makes short work of the chore, usually.

    Thanks for the answers.

    Pete
    Last edited by Pete Wass; 10-10-2019 at 05:47 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    .......I use those felt plugs on their mandrill with 180 clover so it goes quickly. The felt plugs can easily be tightened by twisting the rod so it makes short work of the chore, usually.

    Thanks for the answers.

    Pete


    Tell me more about "those felt plugs on their mandrel" Pete.... You seem to be referring to caliber-specific felt plugs (discs) mounted to (again, caliber-specific?) rods

    I have another use for them than lapping bores but for some reason am unaware of the product you ref

    tx

    al

  7. #7
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    Bore specific cleaning plugs

    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    Tell me more about "those felt plugs on their mandrel" Pete.... You seem to be referring to caliber-specific felt plugs (discs) mounted to (again, caliber-specific?) rods

    I have another use for them than lapping bores but for some reason am unaware of the product you ref

    tx

    al
    I got them from Midway I think. Made in Germany, VFG Weaponcare I think. I first saw them in use with .22 Rimfire stuff. A guy at a match was using them to clean with. It occurred to me they would be ideal to lap out rough spots in barrels and sure enough, they work the very best.

    Pete
    Last edited by Pete Wass; 10-12-2019 at 06:32 PM.

  8. #8
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    What I ended up doing

    was greasing up the threads and using a small adjustable hook spanner I have to pull the barrel into the centering position. It required enough effort that I think the rifle will be good for a few more years. Can't imagine how the factory ever thought that little of a shoulder would last. It didn't! If it were my rifle I might try turning off .025" off the barrel and making a washer to space the shoulder out more on the face of the action but it ain't mine and I don't trust myself to do something like that to a friend''s rifle.

    Anyway, I'm calling this one a success.

    Pete

  9. #9
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    There may be one

    Quote Originally Posted by MilGunsmith View Post
    Some take down rifles had an adjustment in them for wear. It was usually in the front plate that the barrel was attached to. Possibly add some sort of shim plate here to apply pressure towards the muzzle and tighten the fit.
    on the fore end of this rifle. There is a metal piece held on with two screws that is keyed into the piece that butts against the action, that may be adjustable but it would leave a loose barrel on this one.

    Pete

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    I got them from Midway I think. Made in Germany, VFG Weaponcare I think. I first saw them in use with .22 Rimfire stuff. A guy at a match was using them to clean with. It occurred to me they would be ideal to lap out rough spots in barrels and sure enough, they work the very best.

    Pete
    Yeah, you might want to check and see why guys donít pour laps 1/2Ē.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    I got them from Midway I think. Made in Germany, VFG Weaponcare I think. I first saw them in use with .22 Rimfire stuff. A guy at a match was using them to clean with. It occurred to me they would be ideal to lap out rough spots in barrels and sure enough, they work the very best.

    Pete
    Hmmphhhh, shore enough!

    And Brownell's has 'em by gulleee

    thank you Pete

  12. #12
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    Unnecessary Tim

    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    Yeah, you might want to check and see why guys donít pour laps 1/2Ē.
    I am able do do a lot of stuff others can't seem to. Actually I use two of the pads and when they get squished they are well over an inch long. Remember, I'm not trying to lap the whole barrel, just touch up bad stuff.

    Pete

  13. #13
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    On the 99 threads

    I googled it and found a conversation in which a lad advised to peen the threads forward half way and then the front, backward. There was nothing to peen on these threads that I saw but I did tap them a few times. It didn't seem to change the feel of the threads, what little tapping I did. That is a successful way, apparently in some cases. I can see how it could help in some cases. A washer is a better solution, In my opinion though. The other 99 I did had interrupted threads where this one didn't. The gap was likely less than .002" I figured. I didn't measure it but it doesn't take much play at a butt joint to be real loose, as we know.
    Pete

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=Pete Wass;828017]I am able do do a lot of stuff others can't seem to. Actually I use two of the pads and when they get squished they are well over an inch long. Remember, I'm not trying to lap the whole barrel, just touch up bad stuff.

    Pete[/QUOTE

    Ahhhh.
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  15. #15
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    I got a 1917 take down 250 Sav in 2004 that someone made a brass shim to try to tighten it up.

    This year I turned down a Bartlein barrel, chambered in 250 Sav and made a dovetail nut to hang the post war forend that would take a bipod.
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