Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Something I noticed while annealing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Maine & Palm Coast, Fl
    Posts
    6,023

    Something I noticed while annealing

    with the Salt Bath rig I have. If the temp drops below 750 f, the cases don't soften and no pigeon blue appears on the necks. 750 and above things work and work faster as the temp goes up. Only logical I suppose but 750 seems to be the bottom.

    I recently bought a used rifle that came with some brass. As I was cleaning the brass up I found one case that appeared to be dead soft. When I turned my primer pocket cutter in the pocket, the brass felt as soft a chewing gum.

    Pete

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    with the Salt Bath rig I have. If the temp drops below 750 f, the cases don't soften and no pigeon blue appears on the necks. 750 and above things work and work faster as the temp goes up. Only logical I suppose but 750 seems to be the bottom.

    I recently bought a used rifle that came with some brass. As I was cleaning the brass up I found one case that appeared to be dead soft. When I turned my primer pocket cutter in the pocket, the brass felt as soft a chewing gum.

    Pete
    So is the desired result normally to anneal just the neck or the whole case?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6,441
    Quote Originally Posted by antelopedundee View Post
    So is the desired result normally to anneal just the neck or the whole case?

    Probably not wise to anneal the entire case. IMO.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    7,390
    Do not under any circumstances allow the lower 2/3 of the case to reach annealing temperature.

    Rifle brass is manufactured with a particular strength level to withstand the pressure of firing. Th neck and shoulder portion, where the abuse is much lower, is annealed to allow proper Bullet release and sealing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by JerrySharrett View Post
    Probably not wise to anneal the entire case. IMO.
    You are asking for a catastrophic failure if you anneal the entire case. Not my opinion, it is fact!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    ME
    Posts
    1,624
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post

    I recently bought a used rifle that came with some brass. As I was cleaning the brass up I found one case that appeared to be dead soft. When I turned my primer pocket cutter in the pocket, the brass felt as soft a chewing gum.

    Pete
    chewing gum soft, toss it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    Do not under any circumstances allow the lower 2/3 of the case to reach annealing temperature.

    Rifle brass is manufactured with a particular strength level to withstand the pressure of firing. Th neck and shoulder portion, where the abuse is much lower, is annealed to allow proper Bullet release and sealing.
    Guess I'll need to watch one of the videos to see how it's done then.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    267
    How deep are you dipping the necks? Donít want shoulder to be dipped because heat will still work from neck to shoulder slightly. 750f is the low end. Most use 500-550c for 5-8 seconds.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    446
    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    How deep are you dipping the necks? Donít want shoulder to be dipped because heat will still work from neck to shoulder slightly. 750f is the low end. Most use 500-550c for 5-8 seconds.
    Never annealed a case neck in all of my born days.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    ME
    Posts
    1,624

    If you shoot

    Quote Originally Posted by antelopedundee View Post
    Never annealed a case neck in all of my born days.
    a lot and depending on whether you have lots of brass made up for one rifle or if you have 20/30 cases for that rifle you may want to. I don't like making brass so I have a modest number for one barrel and hence shoot them a lot. Eventually I notice some will exhibit looser bullet seating feel than others, they have work hardened differentially. A trip to the annealer to hit the neck area restores the tension I am looking for on the bullet. A lot of whether someone anneals or not is dependent on other factors in how they approach the benchrest game.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    490
    Quote Originally Posted by antelopedundee View Post
    Never annealed a case neck in all of my born days.
    I only do it for carefully prepared AI brass for my tight necked live varmint rifle.

    It is on a Panda action and used eat longer ranges.

    The case necks are 0.0100 thick.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •