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Thread: Another Question about Vintage Benchrest Cartridges

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    60

    Another Question about Vintage Benchrest Cartridges

    I've been working on a photography project, documenting my recently expanded collection of rifles. As I inherited from my gunsmith father in law a few benchrest rifles, some of which go back to the beginnings of the sport, there have been a few rifles that are a mystery to me. One that came up today was a Weber action in the 10xx serial range. It's in a solid walnut stock with 3" forend and it is beautifully executed. It has a Canjar trigger and a Redfield 1" tube internally adjusted scope 24X, which is 23 1/2" long. The scope looks like it's brand new. In fact, the whole rifle is in immaculate condition. Unfortunately, there are no markings on the barrel. I got a .218 gauge pin into the muzzle, so it's a .22. I pulled the bolt and it's a .222 bolt face, so I got out some deuce brass and it didn't fit. Too long. Like .100" too long. So I got some .221 Fireball brass and tried that...too short. It entered the chamber but would not engage the bolt. So what's in between? Were there wildcats that were essentially a shortened .222? I haven't been able to do chamber casts of the mystery guns, but there are more than one. I was just wondering what this rifle might have been chambered in. Thanks for your help.
    Last edited by RCE1; 07-28-2019 at 06:34 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    965
    Quote Originally Posted by RCE1 View Post
    I've been working on a photography project, documenting my recently expanded collection of rifles. As I inherited from my gunsmith father in law a few benchrest rifles, some of which go back to the beginnings of the sport, there have been a few rifles that are a mystery to me. One that came up today was a Weber action in the 10xx serial range. It's in a solid walnut stock with 3" forend and it beautifully executed. It has a Canjar trigger and a Redfield 1" tube internally adjusted scope 24X, which is 23 1/2" long. The scope looks like it's brand new. If fact, the whole rifle is in immaculate condition. Unfortunately, there are no markings on the barrel. I got a .218 gauge pin into the muzzle, so it's a .22. I pulled the bolt and it's a .222 bolt face, so I got out some deuce brass and it didn't fit. Too long. Like .100" too long. So I got some .221 Fireball brass and tried that...too short. It entered the chamber but would not engage the bolt. So what's in between? Were there wildcats that were essentially a shortened .222? I haven't been able to do chamber casts of the mystery guns, but there are more than one. I was just wondering what this rifle might have been chambered in. Thanks for your help.
    Your best bet will be a chamber cast, then look through your F-I-L's dies.

    Rick

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Chehalis, WA.
    Posts
    96
    RC

    The 222 case may not go in because the chamber has a tight neck, maybe .244 to .246.

    If your test case was not neck turned, that maybe the interference preventing closing the bolt.

    FWIW
    Steve Kostanich

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Kostanich View Post
    RC

    The 222 case may not go in because the chamber has a tight neck, maybe .244 to .246.

    If your test case was not neck turned, that maybe the interference preventing closing the bolt.

    FWIW
    Steve Kostanich
    Actually, that's a good point. My benefactor was an enthusiastic turner of necks. He even neck turned .17 Ackley Hornet. I'll have to look around for some different brass. The case I tried was unfired...I took a big position in the .222 a while back and didn't get to load all the brass I bought.

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