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Thread: Does brass become brittle with age just sitting in a box?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by powderbrake View Post
    I have no experience with brittle old brass, but can relate a case of brass cracking.

    Our company was making brass air compressor relief valves ( allowed head pressure to bleed off when compressor stopped), and in some cases the brass shuttle was breaking. It turned out to be because of ammonia. Ammonia will cause intergranular cracking in brass alloys. There was no ammonia in use at those plants, but they were laundries which were processing cloth diapers. Diapers have urine, therefore ammonia.

    So maybe some of this old cracking brass was stored near a diaper bucket, or near ammonia. Windex is high in ammonia. Some metal polishes are as well. I use ones that state NO Ammonia in my brass vibratory cleaner.

    Orrrr, most of my gun cleaning solvents rely heavily on ammonia.

  2. #32
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    Out of curiosity, I measured the web on one of my 6PPC cases at about 85 degrees. Exactly .4395. I then put it in the freezer at about 26 degrees for about 4 hours. It then measured .4392. That's .0003 inch.

    Not much.

  3. #33
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    All I know is something happened

    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    Out of curiosity, I measured the web on one of my 6PPC cases at about 85 degrees. Exactly .4395. I then put it in the freezer at about 26 degrees for about 4 hours. It then measured .4392. That's .0003 inch.

    Not much.
    .0003 inch is not much. However, given that much in each cycle for 40 years,that would be quite a bit. Your example gives a swing of 59 F. I know that is more than an average daily swing but if it were just consider.
    If 40 years of 365 days and 59 F swing result in a .0003 inch expansion or contraction.

    40 x 365= 14,600.
    Therefore 14,600 cycles x .0003 inches of movement = a total of 4.38 inches.

    That's a lot! That amount of movement just might cause work hardening. Even 1/2 that might cause the same thing.

  4. #34
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    Great Info here

    It has been great reading this discussion on brass. It has been discussed by folks with a little understanding and common sense. In other places, it has turned into an all out cuss fight between those that think they know everything and those that know what they have seen in the real world.

    Thanks again

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBob View Post
    It has been great reading this discussion on brass. It has been discussed by folks with a little understanding and common sense. In other places, it has turned into an all out cuss fight between those that think they know everything and those that know what they have seen in the real world.

    Thanks again
    We are all gentlemen here, or try to be. We see an uncommon problem and try to find the truth. That is what makes this forum interesting. Sometimes a little humor happens.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBob View Post
    It has been great reading this discussion on brass. It has been discussed by folks with a little understanding and common sense. In other places, it has turned into an all out cuss fight between those that think they know everything and those that know what they have seen in the real world.

    Thanks again

    heavy on "little understanding and common sense"........ but we mean well, and we're curious as kittens......

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Wynne View Post
    Mr. Antelope,

    Yes, it was necessary. When I said this was a 25/06 AI I was trying not to confuse anyone any more than necessary. It was and extended version of the 25/06 AI. What we did was neck down a 30/06 case in two stages to 270 and then onto .257. We had a the 270 part touching the front of the chamber for head space. Sometimes we actually used 270 Winchester brass.

    Concho Bill
    Bill, blowing the shoulder forward initially is where the excessive work hardening started.

    Subsequent resizing and time did the rest.

    Good shootin'. -Al

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Nyhus View Post
    Bill, blowing the shoulder forward initially is where the excessive work hardening started.

    Subsequent resizing and time did the rest.

    Good shootin'. -Al
    I agree, Al. Back in those days, shooters like me knew nothing about annealing. However, these cases held up after fire forming for many reloads. We just hunted and killed deer. Someone should have told us.

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