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Thread: Stock design?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Stock design?

    Is there any advantages to disadvantages to using a non sloped buttstock? Meaning parallel to the forend? I know some organizations have rules against it but anything i will be shooting doesn't .

    Also im assuming the closer the barrel is to the front bag the less twisting torque will be felt and the more stable the rifle will be?

    I was thinking about building a stock with a straight buttstock and the forend will be around 2 inches deep at the action then go to 1.5 inches just ahead of the action a little bit and it will have 1/2" high square sides and will be 3" wide.

    Any opinions on this? It will be a 30br for score rifle shot in local club matches.

    the only real rule is no wider than 3" and must be shot off a front rest with a sand bag in it and a rear sand bag.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    if no rule, better tracking with a flat parralel butt

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired View Post
    if no rule, better tracking with a flat parralel butt
    Agreed but, the bullet is only in the bore for roughly .050" of gun travel from recoil. That's a very nominal number because there are variables that make a lot of difference, like recoil and weight, but nonetheless...FWIW....I still like the way a straight stock works and handles. I think it would be most beneficial in group shooting from a non-coaxial style of rest. Whether or not it helps accuracy is debatable, IMHO, but it is very cool pulling and pushing the gun back and forth and the crosshair never leaving the dot. Also fwiw, I replied to the same post on another forum but didn't mention in bore time in it. A stock can shoot very well that is crooked as all get out, IME, as long as it's crooked for every shot. And the bullet is gone before less than a very severe crook can matter at all, imho.
    I think the biggest benefit of a stock that tracks perfectly is speed. Just my 2 cents.--M

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwezell View Post
    Agreed but, the bullet is only in the bore for roughly .050" of gun travel from recoil. That's a very nominal number because there are variables that make a lot of difference, like recoil and weight, but nonetheless...FWIW....I still like the way a straight stock works and handles. I think it would be most beneficial in group shooting from a non-coaxial style of rest. Whether or not it helps accuracy is debatable, IMHO, but it is very cool pulling and pushing the gun back and forth and the crosshair never leaving the dot. Also fwiw, I replied to the same post on another forum but didn't mention in bore time in it. A stock can shoot very well that is crooked as all get out, IME, as long as it's crooked for every shot. And the bullet is gone before less than a very severe crook can matter at all, imho.
    I think the biggest benefit of a stock that tracks perfectly is speed. Just my 2 cents.--M

    You talking about a crooked stock reminds me of a guy I use to play pool with. He used his own cue that was so crooked you could see it across the pool hall. He had a line marked on it that he would line up with one of his fingers every time . He was hard to beat. But he always said if the cue was lined up the same everytime it was consistent .

  5. #5
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    washington.........STATE that is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrxR View Post
    You talking about a crooked stock reminds me of a guy I use to play pool with. He used his own cue that was so crooked you could see it across the pool hall. He had a line marked on it that he would line up with one of his fingers every time . He was hard to beat. But he always said if the cue was lined up the same everytime it was consistent .
    I own a pool table and have 20-30 cues and shafts and I played for a while using his method (lots of shafts are indexed) but found that using a shaft the same way all the time tended to bias the leather tip.

    That said, if I'm in a bar and play off the wall I will pick the crookedest stick I can find

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    193
    And now, back to our originally scheduled program.
    As you are designing and building a stock for club score matches, I would think youíll find a straight line stock a bit limiting in target navigation. What do you care about returning to point of aim when you are moving from target to target? Itís not like group shooting where your point of aim is the same for five or ten shots. The drop in the butt stock can be advantageous for minor adjustments in elevation. I may be off a bit with my choices in a stock but then Iíve never looked to shoot billiards with a crooked cue either.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    159
    Quote Originally Posted by FBecigneul View Post
    And now, back to our originally scheduled program.
    As you are designing and building a stock for club score matches, I would think youíll find a straight line stock a bit limiting in target navigation. What do you care about returning to point of aim when you are moving from target to target? Itís not like group shooting where your point of aim is the same for five or ten shots. The drop in the butt stock can be advantageous for minor adjustments in elevation. I may be off a bit with my choices in a stock but then Iíve never looked to shoot billiards with a crooked cue either.
    You make a good point but with my rimfire it has a slopped but but i never make adjustments with the bag i do all my adjustments with the front rest.

  8. #8
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    Doesn't matter in the slightest, in terms of accuracy, whether the stock is straight or sloped.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilbur View Post
    Doesn't matter in the slightest, in terms of accuracy, whether the stock is straight or sloped.
    The records prove this. I prefer straightline stocks when legal so I can watch my bullets impact and not inadvertently lose which target bull I am on.

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