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Thread: Barrel Break In......June Precision Rifleman

  1. #1
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    Barrel Break In......June Precision Rifleman

    I finally got my June issue, and it has interesting discussions from shooters concerning barrel break in.

    I put about five rounds down a new barrel, cleaning after each shot. Thatís about it. I talked to Krieger years ago about this, and pretty much follow their guidelines.

    I do not put anything in my barrels except Butches Bore Shine. I donít bore scope them. During group matches, I clean the Rifle with about 10 strokes with a saturated bronze brush followed by 3 or 4 wet patches, then patch it until they come out clean.

    On my 30BR VFS Rifle, I donít clean it for the entire Grand Agg.

    Any thoughts on this.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    I finally got my June issue, and it has interesting discussions from shooters concerning barrel break in.

    I put about five rounds down a new barrel, cleaning after each shot. Thatís about it. I talked to Krieger years ago about this, and pretty much follow their guidelines.

    I do not put anything in my barrels except Butches Bore Shine. I donít bore scope them. During group matches, I clean the Rifle with about 10 strokes with a saturated bronze brush followed by 3 or 4 wet patches, then patch it until they come out clean.

    On my 30BR VFS Rifle, I donít clean it for the entire Grand Agg.

    Any thoughts on this.
    Well Jackie. I guess everyone has their own idea on how to break in a new bbl. I read an article years ago written by Gale McMillan and it was a pretty good article. On a freshly chambered new or used bbl I just run a few patches of Wipe out patch out just to make sure there is nothing left in the barrel that the gunsmith missed. I shoot 5 shots with naked bullets then clean, 5 more then clean and that's it. I've never had a carbon ring in any barrel of mine and I don't use any brushes nylon or bronze. I borescope my barrels every once in a while. I coat my own bullets with HBN and I've found that it makes cleaning easier and I have almost no copper at all when cleaning. I use to use Butch's until a friend of mine from MD gave me a couple of cases of Wipe out Patch out and accelerator. You'd be surprised at how much better the Wipe out works. Just clean your barrel with Butch's and after your done put some Wipe out down the bore and see what happens. I'll shoot a whole agg match and then clean and it usually take 3 patches to finish the job. Like I said I'm sure you'll get a 100 different answers on how people break in their barrels. If you get a chance read McMillan's article. Take care Jackie. PS: I'm going to use your tuner that you made me for a 100 yard score match on Sunday. Will let you know how it worked.

  3. #3
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    Barrel Break in

    I shot a little Rim Fire Competition a couple years before I got the centerfire bug. I don't remember ever seeing any special instructions on how to break in a Rim Fire barrel. Why is that? Are Rim Fire Barrels made out of a different material? Is it the lead bullets fired in Rim Fire Barrels? There has gotta be an answer to this question. If not, then I question the need to bother with breaking in the barrels used in Centerfire competition. Just my thoughts this morning.


    Glenn

  4. #4
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    A rimfire doesn't have the heat and pressure to burn/polish out the throat. A rimfire throat has to have this done after chambering by mechanical means by the gunsmith. They have their own ways of doing this. If it is not done, it takes a LOT of shooting to wear in and if it is severe, it may never wear in.

  5. #5
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    Barrel Break in

    My question brought out a Rim Fire expert. Good to see you on here Jerry.

    I had not heard about the Rim Fire barrel break in procedure being performed by the gunsmith.
    Not unusual though. You could write a book about BR stuff Ive never heard about.

    Another question, could the same break in procedure,you mentioned, be performed by a gunsmith, after chambering a centerfire barrel?

    Next question. Did you break in your barrels when you shot center fire?


    Glenn

  6. #6
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    I don't know about that expert you are referring to. The CF barrel throat has the same issues as a RF, but will take care of itself with the shoot 1 shot and clean procedure. When a RF finishing technique is employed on a CF barrel, the need for break in is eliminated. I came up with my finishing procedure in the mid nineties and could shoot 3400 loads right off the bat without any fouling issues. When I moved to RF, I used the same procedure as I did with CF.

  7. #7
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    "hobbing" anyone?

  8. #8
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    Interesting

    Thanks for taking the time to share your experience on this discussion.

    I'm almost embarrassed to say, "I didn't know that"

    I'm not a gunsmith but I sure would like to know what your finishing procedure is. Just curious.



    Glenn

  9. #9
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    I will not discuss the exact methods due to the likelihood of the inexperienced damaging a carefully chambered job. This is something you would discuss with your gunsmith. Be advised that many gunsmiths may pooh pooh this concept if they have not been successful in producing accurate lead bullet barrels.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry H View Post
    I will not discuss the exact methods due to the likelihood of the inexperienced damaging a carefully chambered job. This is something you would discuss with your gunsmith. Be advised that many gunsmiths may pooh pooh this concept if they have not been successful in producing accurate lead bullet barrels.



    I understand.


    Glenn

  11. #11
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    "Hobbing" by itself does not address the issue completely. There is the cutting swarf as well as any radial gouges that often do not show up with a borescope examination.

  12. #12
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    Look at all the different ways top shooters break their barrels in and they all win consistently. I have always felt break in procedures were more of a mental thing for the shooter to feel they are doing best to get accuracy out of a barrel and it really does not matter how you break in a barrel for accuracy. So break in the barrel the way you feel is best for you mentally.

    Do you know where one shot clean came from? As I have been told, a barrel maker from Indiana Bob Shearer (probably wrong spelling) had some barrels go out that he did not properly lap. He got some complaints on fouling and he came up with one shot clean for 20 rounds as a way to break in a barrel properly and then the shooter was actually finish lapping his barrels to not foul. About this same time Fred Sinclair was starting Sinclair Intl and he added this procedure to his catalog as a "shooter"s tip" to make rifles and their barrels shoot better. And now it is considered a must do for many shooters. If this is true as I have been told by several old and I mean really old timers, pretty smart for Mr. Shearer.

    I am only referring to CF barrels!

    Jim

  13. #13
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    Folklore

    Thanks for sharing that story Jim. Benchrest Folklore with no empirical evidence to support the claim. Sounds familiar.

    I've never been a superstitious person




    Glenn

  14. #14
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    Years ago, when I discussed the Break In/Cleaning regiment with Krieger, their opinion was we over clean their cut rifled barrels.

    Cut rifled barrels have multitudes of extremely small lengthways inclusions in the groove surface that is a result of the actual cutting process. These get filled with almost microscopic layers of copper wash.

    Their contention was, leave it in there with just a normal cleaning. We do not shoot matches with clean barrels. After the first couple of rounds, it is there again. Using extreme methods to remove it is an exercise in futility.

    I have followed that line of thought for years.

    This of course pertains to only cut rifled barrels. I havenít shot a button rifle barrel since about 1997.

  15. #15
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    Several years ago smith and Wesson had an issue on their new, at the time, 500 s&w revolvers. The problem was flame cutting of the top strap of the frame. They fixed the problem by polishing that area of the frame on new revolvers before they left the factory.
    I think a lot can be learned from this.
    First, it solved the flame cutting because the same flame traveled smoothly over and around the top strap without damage because the small burrs that acted as heat sinks were polished away. Problem solved, in their case.
    In bbl break in, I think the same thing occurs but with each successive shot before cleaning, a copper shield from the heat and flame gets laid down, particularly in the throat area. Continue firing without removing that copper plating and very quickly, you have, for example, 3 lands properly broken in and one not. You can never fully recover from that initial uneven wear.

    Take this fwiw, but I subscribe religiously to the one shot and clean regimen...at least for the first 10-20 shots or until a substantial fall off of copper fouling occurs, which is typically well within that range.

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