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Thread: for Coots....

  1. #31
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    Down By the Cedar River
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    Cool story Mort. I designed the shots and loaded them for years. I know how noisey it gets under a truck box when things go awry and fly rocks pellet you...here's a video you might enjoy with your explosive background. I used to have a little fun now and then... I don't know why it starts at 41 seconds in???????????


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUalpgfUVOM&t=41s


    Dave
    Last edited by Dave Coots; 06-18-2019 at 01:03 PM.

  2. #32
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    Dec 2015
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    Nampa Idaho
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    The video

    That's a great video..I watch it in the morning with my coffee.Good for a laff and a way to start the day.

    Mort

  3. #33
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    Dec 2003
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    We were up at the pit behind the house working on a flat pit floor maybe 15acres. We were setting forms for moving the truck scales and were told we had to leave for 20min. We went down the hill and after the whistles and all clears we drove back into the pit to find this enormous pile setting where it wasn't 20min ago. When I say enormous, I mean 4-6ft bones piled 70+ feet high in a huge snow cone. The Dyno-Nobel crew had sent 5 different faces and floor shots into this huge pile, a computerized series of blasts lifted the rock, sent it all to the pile and it collided in mid-air and dropped. Couple big excavators and loaders grumbling around clearing stray dice off the floor and placing them around the base of the pile.

    It was stunning to say the least. If I were to guess, some of the rock flew 200ft to land on the pile. The crew were all gathered around videos re-playing the timed sequence of shots but they wouldn't show us anything.

    All's I know is there was a MASSIVE friggin' pile there that wasn't there a minute ago!

    Here's the pit, the floor is now well below the scale shack

    https://www.google.com/maps/dir/J+L+...d45.855244!3e0

  4. #34
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    Dec 2015
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    Nampa Idaho
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    Scales

    Al, We use scales for hauling timber to get volume,and weight if hauling rock on county roads with structure and weight limitations.

    The air photos you show here look like 1/2000 which are what I used in the planning process for timber haul and any road improvements.

    Mort
    Last edited by dmort; 06-19-2019 at 07:49 PM.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    Al, We use scales for hauling timber to get volume,and weight if hauling rock on county roads with structure and weight limitations.

    The air photos you show here look like 1/2000 which are what I used in the planning process for timber haul and any road improvements.

    Mort
    I dunno.... I just looked at google earth and linked it. My home is off to the left with my range cut in from my shop. It's right at 660yds from the wall of my shop to the timber at the end of the range (edge of clearcut) if that helps for scale. That said, my google link provides a measuring tape and I can just measure point-to-point anywhere on the grid

  6. #36
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    Hokayy..... I just followed the link and I was unclear. MY HOME is not the one directly west of the pit. My neighbor also has a range, and a clearcut, much larger than mine.....

    MY HOME and range are west and south, my range is cut at an angle and terminates in the mushroom-shaped smaller clearcut and is the 660yds

    TMI I know but I didn't want anyone measuring the neighbor guy's distances and seeing a lot more than my measly 660yds.

  7. #37
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    Dec 2015
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    Nampa Idaho
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    Al
    Pretty sure I f.ound your place....was going to check it out again today but your map disappered.

    We didn't weigh timber. It was scaled ( measured for volume ) at scaling stations or the mill yard. My wife was a part time scaler for the Forest Service. I have a picture of her on top of a logging truck measuring a 3 log load. We cut a Doug Fir once we couldn't get on a logging truck. I wasn't out there at the time but they managed to roll it on a low boy with a dozer.

    Mort

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    Al
    Pretty sure I f.ound your place....was going to check it out again today but your map disappered.

    We didn't weigh timber. It was scaled ( measured for volume ) at scaling stations or the mill yard. My wife was a part time scaler for the Forest Service. I have a picture of her on top of a logging truck measuring a 3 log load. We cut a Doug Fir once we couldn't get on a logging truck. I wasn't out there at the time but they managed to roll it on a low boy with a dozer.

    Mort

    LOL!!

    You said


    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    The air photos you show here look like 1/2000 which are what I used in the planning process........

    I _think_ that would be 1:2000 scale to the USGS who taken the photos. I thought ya's was measuring stuff


    Yeahh, the logging industry is fascinating. We had 12-15 springboard stumps on the property when we bought it, and we took out two stumps at the homesite that still aren't burnt 20yrs later even though we've tried 3-4 times. I stacked and fed slash onto the edge of one stump for three days while hitting it with a 4ft airplane prop powered by a 20hp Briggs. That blower would eat holes through 20-30ft of slash and blow out both sides around the stump but never more than charred the actual stump....... just a big ol' coal on the side, the stump acting as a diverter for the airflow lol

    We logged 10-12 loads here this last fall, one load was a 6-logger, and my feller left one old larch standing because the TD-8 dozer I was using wouldn't be able to move it.

  9. #39
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    Dec 2015
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    Photo scale

    You're right Al, USGS Quad Map Scale 1:2000 equal 2.64 inches per mile. If the photo height from the plane is correct you can take ortho (veg. type) photos and lay them right over a quad map. The fit is never perfect because of variation in topography. The camera in the plane assumes a constant distance between the lens and the ground surface for scale...never happen.

    Now that you're an expert in photogrammetry we will move onto slash disposal. A Briggs and Stratton with an airplane prop! I have to laugh just thinking about it. It is typical Al...the free thinker.: )

    The thick bark on old growth Fir is pretty fire resistant. When splitting Fir for firewood, I would bring the bark home and burn it. It worked great in the wood stove.

    Still laughing

    Mort
    Last edited by dmort; 06-20-2019 at 09:16 PM.

  10. #40
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    Dec 2003
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    washington.........STATE that is.
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    Using blowers on piles brush is perty much standard here.....it often takes a jumpstart to get them self-sucking. of course a small pile is the size of a house, a large one the size of a school.

    Those two stumps that won't start are simply too large and dense. The bark is long gone off them. If I ever have a big machine here, something with a 12ft or longer stinger I'll have 'em split but meantime they'll just set off in the brush for the next 100yrs

    my 4ft saw might get'em seamed deep enough to split with a backhoe but just a lot of work for nothing IMO, I've got room

  11. #41
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    Al
    A 6 log load has to be pretty good these days. Do you bid on timber or just the haul ?

    Mcoulgh used to make chainsaws for large timber....big on bottom end but heavy by later standards. We called them ha,ha's....you would pull the cord and it would go ha,ha,ha,ha.

    Mort

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmort View Post
    Al
    A 6 log load has to be pretty good these days. Do you bid on timber or just the haul ?

    Mcoulgh used to make chainsaws for large timber....big on bottom end but heavy by later standards. We called them ha,ha's....you would pull the cord and it would go ha,ha,ha,ha.

    Mort
    Neither, we bootlegged these out of my range for setup of my Oehler 43's and so's I could get my 600yd shot

    They were in my way........

    My Dad was a small engine mechanic back in the late 60's early 70's and the claim floated about this area was that "the McCullough carb was so over-engineered that you could fire it up at the base of a big fir, climb up to top 'er out and the saw wouldn't run because of the altitude change"


    My Dad's brother Jim had one of them big saws..... they set him up on a two-man saw but the other guy couldn't keep up in the woods so Jim bob-tailed 'er down to 6-foot and ran 'er alone.

  13. #43
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    Dec 2015
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    Nampa Idaho
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    Logging

    Al,
    I made a lot of friends in the logging business and two of them were seriously injured. There were the Mortensen brothers that called me cousin Mort. They were sen instead of son...whatever. Brother Milt was falling salvage (dead Fir) when his tree hit another and a flying limb hit him the back. He was hospitalized and out of business for quite a while. His brother Gene, was a rigger on a skyline unit when the tail hold broke loose under a lot of tension. The cable whipped across the unit and set him flying. The wife and I went to the hospital asap. He looked awful and was heavily drugged. He did remember we were there....surprise.

    Another friend was a climber and he had some serious balls. We called him (English John) because of his accent. He had a great background from logging in England, Scotland and Norway. He wanted to work in big timber so he moved to the West Coast of the US. He had no fear of heights and made a couple of jobs I did possible. Him and his wife came to visit us last year and he still looks good.

    The Mortensen brothers have since passed away.

    Milt's saw a HaHa!

    Mort
    Last edited by dmort; 06-23-2019 at 04:16 PM.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    NY and PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by liljoe View Post
    Do you think prime shipping would be free on 50 tons of crushed limestone for my driveway?
    Might have to check on it.

    Joe Hynes
    I just blew my Jamison's out my nose! gosh that burns but i don't care who ya are that is FUNNY

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