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Thread: I want to raise my lathe 3-4 inches

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    South Central WI
    Posts
    237
    I used pistons from a big Diesel engine for standoffs (metal scrap bin find). Faced the top, turned the base and put a hard rubber bench material under each so contact was solid around the perimeter of the base of each. Pretty darned stable and worked well IMO. I suppose a raised concrete t pad on each side would be ideal.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Williamson County, Texas
    Posts
    278

    just another way to skin a deer

    Homegrown feet for my SBL13. 2 inch thick, 4 inch round aluminum, cheap from ebay. 5/8 x18 bolts, and the lathe base threaded accordingly.
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  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Dayton Wyoming
    Posts
    14

    Similar problem

    I constructed forms for the front and rear using 2x4's so to gain 3 1/2" in height. These were on top of the poured floor and to keep them secured I hammer drilled some holes in the original floor to put short pieces of rebar in to form a tie. Poured the forms full of Sackrete. I use hold downs as well as jack screws to level with and have had no problems at all. Cement is dead and that is good. Red

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
    Posts
    539
    there is a great video by Adam Booth (Abom79) on youtube showing the process he went through in raising his victor lathe.
    lookup "machining lathe riser feet" there are two parts and then he shows how he levels the lathe.
    He's a big guy and it seemed to work very well for him.
    Mike

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    32

    Post Thanks for all

    I'd like to thank everyone for the info. I've decided to go with an H shaped pad for foot clearance. I've got a blank canvas at the moment, but I'm very close to getting a permit to start this project. Thanks Jackie for the size 13 foot clearance recommendation. I hadn't thought about that issue.

    Butch, Thanks for your response and Mr. Neilson's but this is the Low Country and if you dig a hole it fills up with water before you can finish it. That certainly is great reverse engineering advice though.



    I thank everyone for their responses,

    Waverly

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Poetry, Tex.
    Posts
    6,356
    Quote Originally Posted by waverly View Post
    I'd like to thank everyone for the info. I've decided to go with an H shaped pad for foot clearance. I've got a blank canvas at the moment, but I'm very close to getting a permit to start this project. Thanks Jackie for the size 13 foot clearance recommendation. I hadn't thought about that issue.

    Butch, Thanks for your response and Mr. Neilson's but this is the Low Country and if you dig a hole it fills up with water before you can finish it. That certainly is great reverse engineering advice though.



    I thank everyone for their responses,

    Waverly


    Chuckle, chuckle! I'm still bending over mine. I haven't dug that ditch yet.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    498
    Metal or concrete is really required.

    Concrete tends to cause corrosion of metal in contact, if only from ambient humidity.

    Wood changes size with humidity.
    Not all that much with the grain but a large amount tangentially or radially relative the the fibers of the wood.

    It also is not all that hard to exceed the compressive strength of wood fiber.

    I use whatever I have the correct size scrap around.

    Usually some steel plate but occasionally aluminum.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    washington.........STATE that is.
    Posts
    10,334
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    last year 4" and like it better and I'm 5'8". I made a box from wood. Mill was sitting on a piece of steel plate so I just made a box with a center piece the size of the plate and moved it up. Also fastened it to the wall. It's a small Grizzly on it's own cabinet. A lot easier to see what I'm doing.

    Pete
    I set my Bridgeport on casters..... I didn't move it up forevermore high but it's up about 3" from setting flat on the floor. Sure is handy to be able to move it around!

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Odessa TX
    Posts
    139

    Raising the bar

    Don's comments reminds me of a story I heard a few years ago.

    A couple Aggies were trying to get a mule out of a barn but the tips of the mule's ears would touch the top of the door opening and it spooked the mule and each time he would back up and sit down.

    After numerous unsuccessful attempts to get the mule out, the two of them decided the best plan of action was to jack up the front of the barn a few inches in order to keep the door way from touching the mule's ears.

    Along comes a guy wearing a Tech ball cap and asked what was going on with all the jacks and blocks. After listening to the problem he suggested "Why not just dig out some of the dirt under the door a few inches?" The Aggies said they already had a plan that they felt would work but thanked him anyway for the suggestion.

    Once the Tech guy was out of earshot, one Aggie said to the other, "What a dumb ass, it ain't the mule's legs that are too long... its the friggin ears!"

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    498
    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    I set my Bridgeport on casters..... I didn't move it up forevermore high but it's up about 3" from setting flat on the floor. Sure is handy to be able to move it around!
    Steel wheels?

    I have plenty of heavy things (cabinets) on steel wheels so they can actually be moved.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    washington.........STATE that is.
    Posts
    10,334
    Quote Originally Posted by brickeyee View Post
    Steel wheels?

    I have plenty of heavy things (cabinets) on steel wheels so they can actually be moved.
    yeahh

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