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Thread: chamber after reaming what ?

  1. #1
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    chamber after reaming what ?

    gentlemen.
    i have seen a couple of comments, but search showed nothing.
    after cutting a chamber, what do you do to it ?
    polish, burnish, how little
    i have reamed a chamber and have no runout.
    indicator wiggles but does not move my guess .0001.
    do i leave it as reamed or ???
    thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by retired View Post
    gentlemen.
    i have seen a couple of comments, but search showed nothing.
    after cutting a chamber, what do you do to it ?
    polish, burnish, how little
    i have reamed a chamber and have no runout.
    indicator wiggles but does not move my guess .0001.
    do i leave it as reamed or ???
    thanks
    I think that the pro's on this website will tell you to leave it alone if your reamer did a nice job.

  3. #3
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    I have found that the finish left in a properly reamed chamber allows the case to grip the walls, release, and give easy extraction.

    Notice I said properly reamed.

  4. #4
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    I have to cover rule #1. Don't do anything to make the phone ring. That includes those horrific rings on the brass so i do a quick polish with 240.
    But really it depends on the reamer. Not all cut the with the same finish and it changes over 80 or so chambers.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Tooley View Post
    I have to cover rule #1. Don't do anything to make the phone ring. That includes those horrific rings on the brass so i do a quick polish with 240.
    But really it depends on the reamer. Not all cut the with the same finish and it changes over 80 or so chambers.
    LOL those horrific rings you can see but can't feel. As a machine shop teacher I had years ago said, "It needs to be in tolerance, but above all it has to look good". Being in the shop business for many years I under stand your reason for rule #1.
    Last edited by Gappmast; 03-17-2019 at 12:37 PM.

  6. #6
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    Cool read

    read what bill brawand said earlyALWAYS POLISH

  7. #7
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    Retired

    I use 320grit wrapped around a wood dowel with a light oil.

    1: I lightly remove the sharp edge at rear of chamber.
    2: make 2or3 passes on chamber walls "do not touch the neck!"
    3: I use wire brush for the neck {.330 neck I'll use .338 brush} in case there are any unseen burr's.

    Does any of it increase accuracy or decrease accuracy probably not! just personal satisfaction.

    Russ

  8. #8
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    I always hit it lightly with a piece of 320 on a dowel and a shot of kroil. It's only cosmetic unless you intend to remove a tad bit of material. Remember the 50 millionths man? A light polish with 320 is less than that. About 3 seconds at 1255 rpm. I also do it to make sure I leave no burr and a smooth finish at the end of the chamber. I just hold the dowel at an angle, hit the opening of the chamber and then put the dowel parallel to the chamber for about 3 strokes from the end of the chamber to the shoulder, and done.

  9. #9
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    I use 600 grit on a pencil with cutting oil AFTER making sure the chamber is very clean. Don’t want to drag a chunk of stainless around it. Then I use red scotchbrite wrapped around a bore brush to shine it a bit. Here come the “bolt thrust” arguments.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mram10 View Post
    I use 600 grit on a pencil with cutting oil AFTER making sure the chamber is very clean. Don’t want to drag a chunk of stainless around it. Then I use red scotchbrite wrapped around a bore brush to shine it a bit. Here come the “bolt thrust” arguments.
    +1

  11. #11
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    Referring back to my post #3, it appears I am in the minority.

    But for the reasons I mentioned, I stand by what I said.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    I have found that the finish left in a properly reamed chamber allows the case to grip the walls, release, and give easy extraction.

    Notice I said properly reamed.
    Jackie,
    You aren’t in the minority. We have argued this for the last decade on 6br. I properly ream my chambers, yet I feel that it should look like a piece of jewelry. I like everything shiny. Yours obviously work. Mine work. Just a preference. I Still study and try your methods
    Last edited by Mram10; 03-18-2019 at 08:29 AM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    Referring back to my post #3, it appears I am in the minority.

    But for the reasons I mentioned, I stand by what I said.
    I don't think either is wrong. Unlike, for example...I see some smiths that take pride in leaving the very sharp crest on a male v thread rather than knocking the thread crests down to proper spec or turning for a major od that provides for it....flat width on top of thread= 1/8 of thread height. That sharp sliver on top does nothing but can cause a gall. I'm not making this up...It's in machinerys handbook in the threading section.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwezell View Post
    I don't think either is wrong. Unlike, for example...I see some smiths that take pride in leaving the very sharp crest on a male v thread rather than knocking the thread crests down to proper spec or turning for a major od that provides for it....flat width on top of thread= 1/8 of thread height. That sharp sliver on top does nothing but can cause a gall. I'm not making this up...It's in machinerys handbook in the threading section.
    Machinery Handbook? Threading Section?

    Mike, do you mean to tell me there is actually a methodology written as to the proper way to do this stuff?
    And hear I thought you just went on the intranets and you were automatically an expert.
    I get in this discussion with guys a lot who think a super tight "micrometer" fit is a great idea for stainless. Hell the stuff galls if you look at it crosseyed.
    Then they find out what it costs to bore a barrel stub out of an action and fix the threads.
    There are classes of threads for a reason, and to paraphrase Jackie's often quoted point: figure out what you want/need and then the best way to get there.
    I am not saying that years of experience are not the most valuable asset you can have, and hardly a day goes by that I don't learn something new/better/wrong
    when I'm running the machines. That to me is the great joy in machining! Your always learning (if your paying attention).
    I do get the impression though that a lot of people would be better off learning the basics, (preferably on manual machines) and the right way of doing things first.
    Grinding cutters, feeds & speeds, MEASURING!
    As my Machine Technology prof told me many years ago, play with that mic for a few weeks and then come talk to me bout tenths and will see.

    As to the OP's question I leave them as reamed unless to Dave's point they have some of those "horrific rings" (the ones you can't feel or detect) and then I hit them with a quick touch up with 320 and cutting oil. Now if you can feel them you need to reevaluate your process or your reamer.
    I am developing a love/hate relationship with borescopes, they are making everyone an expert on chambers.

    One mans opinion, worth what I charge for it.
    Greg

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wfcustom View Post
    Machinery Handbook? Threading Section?

    Mike, do you mean to tell me there is actually a methodology written as to the proper way to do this stuff?
    And hear I thought you just went on the intranets and you were automatically an expert.
    I get in this discussion with guys a lot who think a super tight "micrometer" fit is a great idea for stainless. Hell the stuff galls if you look at it crosseyed.
    Then they find out what it costs to bore a barrel stub out of an action and fix the threads.
    There are classes of threads for a reason, and to paraphrase Jackie's often quoted point: figure out what you want/need and then the best way to get there.
    I am not saying that years of experience are not the most valuable asset you can have, and hardly a day goes by that I don't learn something new/better/wrong
    when I'm running the machines. That to me is the great joy in machining! Your always learning (if your paying attention).
    I do get the impression though that a lot of people would be better off learning the basics, (preferably on manual machines) and the right way of doing things first.
    Grinding cutters, feeds & speeds, MEASURING!
    As my Machine Technology prof told me many years ago, play with that mic for a few weeks and then come talk to me bout tenths and will see.

    As to the OP's question I leave them as reamed unless to Dave's point they have some of those "horrific rings" (the ones you can't feel or detect) and then I hit them with a quick touch up with 320 and cutting oil. Now if you can feel them you need to reevaluate your process or your reamer.
    I am developing a love/hate relationship with borescopes, they are making everyone an expert on chambers.

    One mans opinion, worth what I charge for it.
    Greg
    Lol! Yes, I agree with all of that, Greg. I've seen people boast of not needing to hit their threads with a piece of sandpaper etc, that they are just perfect left sharp....and they claim "zero" clearance on their threads, too! No sir, they are not perfect like that and isn't a zero clearance thread used in plumbing, ie, pipe threads?

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