Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 39

Thread: swapping brass between barrels

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    75

    Good Idea

    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle Schultz View Post
    If brass is to be dedicated to one barrel, does that imply that a dedicated fire forming barrel is a bad idea? Or is it okay for the initial firing?
    Kyle itís a good idea. As you know it takes about 3 x firings to obtain full shape, so nil issues swapping to the actual barrel after the first fire form load.

    Michael

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6,444
    Some 20-25 years ago it was common to not full length size brass. But a common practice then was to take a set of brass and shoot several groups with it and mark and cull the brass that shot bullets out of the groups..

    hen we started shooting loads so hot the brass had to be full length sized after each firing.

    But have we "come a long ways baby"?


    .

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    800

    interesting people

    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    I completely agree. It's a fascinating industry employing many highly skilled and specialized people...... just like the automotive industry, the building industry, big oil, shipbuilding and maintenance (getting a glimpse into Jackie's world is such a treat) or any other facet of our lives. My father-in-law and his brother were inventors in America's Golden Age Of Innovation..... they actually LIVED the growth curve, starting in Detroit with "The Kings Of Industry", he even settled in the UP where Henry Ford, Harvey Firestone, Thomas Edison, Ernest Hemingway etc spent their summers.... Back when we could do/build/explore/conquer anything. He designed and built equipment for making experimental stuff for CalTech, MIT, NASA ....... when we needed stuff we just stepped up and BUILT IT! And if we couldn't move it, make a bigger machine.....Letourneau's 'Of Men And Machines' gives us a glimpse into heavy equipment, then, when one has relatives and friends working those huge mines it's neat to go look closer..... to stand in a loader bucket that will carry your entire home......


    I'm blessed to know literally hundreds of people working from under water and underground to the edge of space and it's ALL just friggin' too cool for words....INLUDING the nuclear power industry (or the plutonium industry LOL) but I grew up around the phrase "well, it ain't rocket science" only to grow up and find that NASA is about as dysfunctional as our local building dept and for the most part no brighter. And the power production/distribution industry is definitely a fascinating one.......I've got friends at Bonneville Power, many of my relatives lived and died with Hanford and Trojan, and now lotsa' folks involved with them stupid windmills lol....

    Anyways, wasn't pickin' on ya'.... just completely disagreeing with the idea that high end accuracy is "simple compared to complicated stuff like nuke/space)"

    cuz it AIN'T
    Al, here on the east coast (PA) most are just waiting for spring as we've had quite enough of winter. Getting into these discussions is an interesting and informative way to spend some time. Many in the nuclear power industry come from the Navy's nuclear power program and were submariners; many during the Cold War. One of the fellows I worked with had an uncle who was on the USS Nautilus when it made it's historic voyage under the North Pole. That same uncle went down with the USS Thresher. A VP at one of our sister plants, James Von Suskill, was the skipper of the USS Augusta trailing a Soviet boomer during the Cold War. His sonar man heard what he thought were missile doors being opened and it had to be assumed the Soviets were going to launch a first strike against the east coast. Von Suskill had his firing solutions for the torpedoes ready to blow the sub to eternity. His sonar man was pretty sharp and further deduced that there was a leak in one of the missile tubes allowing seawater to mix with liquid hydrazine and the order to launch torpedoes was belayed, thereby avoiding what could have been the spark that ignited WWlll. There is a book entitled 'Hostile Waters' that goes into more detail. The Soviets claimed the Augusta collided with them, the US Navy had an entirely different story. Much of the detail remains classified but I did meet Von Suskill and helped to investigate an overhead crane malfunction when he was the VP at our sister plant, providing an independent non BS report as to what actually happened.

    Hanford, WA. The clean up at Hanford has been complicated by the fact that many of the piping and instrument dwgs. (P & IDs) are non existent due to the classified nature of Hanford's purpose.

    Saw and heard the director of emergency services for TEPCO talk about Japan's nuclear tragedy at Fukashima. It was sobering to say the least. Every US nuclear plant has instituted emergency measures and staged equipment for an unexpected event as a result of what happened at Fukushima. The rationale is plan and prepare for the unexpected.

    One final note. I remember, as a young boy, watching the ECHO satellite traverse the western night sky. The space race was on and we were all witness to America's response, it's technological challenges along with the dedicate brave people who put their asses on the line. I re-read Tom Wolfe's 'The Right Stuff' every couple of years to get a feel for what that period entailed.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    washington.........STATE that is.
    Posts
    10,278
    Quote Originally Posted by chino69 View Post
    Al, here on the east coast (PA) most are just waiting for spring as we've had quite enough of winter...........
    I just walked by where my wife is taking a live class on her laptop. ILTS streamed from Hancock MI and I overheard "Ohh Noooo, that's not gonna' melt 'til June!!"

    Sounds like the midwest might be hit-or-miss whether ice-out beats the fishing opener LOL

    I don't miss it.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    ME
    Posts
    1,624

    I think

    swapping brass between barrels that a smith had tried to get chambers the same makes sense, especially if you have prepped a couple hundred for each barrel. Lets say the barrel becomes uncompetitive at 3000 shots, that's only 15 reloads per case, not many. I choose to make about 30 and load as I need to, so I've never been concerned about it. My experience trying it is, it sometimes goes, sometimes does not.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    800

    swapping brass between barrels

    Quote Originally Posted by glp View Post
    swapping brass between barrels that a smith had tried to get chambers the same makes sense, especially if you have prepped a couple hundred for each barrel. Lets say the barrel becomes uncompetitive at 3000 shots, that's only 15 reloads per case, not many. I choose to make about 30 and load as I need to, so I've never been concerned about it. My experience trying it is, it sometimes goes, sometimes does not.
    It certainly saves time and money having your dies set exactly as you want without fiddling around with settings every time you FL size.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    800

    swapping brass between barrels

    Quote Originally Posted by JerrySharrett View Post
    Some 20-25 years ago it was common to not full length size brass. But a common practice then was to take a set of brass and shoot several groups with it and mark and cull the brass that shot bullets out of the groups..

    hen we started shooting loads so hot the brass had to be full length sized after each firing.

    But have we "come a long ways baby"?


    .
    Jerry, isn't FL sizing every time also to make all the brass as consistent as possible? Does anyone, not competition BR, just neck size anymore?

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    S.E. MI
    Posts
    2,191
    Quote Originally Posted by chino69 View Post
    It is actually a frigging curse; not meant to make the rest of the world feel inadequate. One cannot imagine the level of detail, scrutiny and accountability that is involved. It is almost akin to a cult and I'm in need of deprogramming. Actually it was a fascinating industry with some very highly skilled people with interesting stories and backgrounds.
    Chino.
    I understand. Worked for an OEM, in that field.....And it's a little hard to adjust.
    I have known 3 guys, who mixed brass....and all 3 broke off the bolt handle trying to open the action....Don't know the specs....

    I have had 3 rifles. 3 very different rifles. But, all barrels were chambered by the same guy...Maybe the same reamer.....prolly 10 yrs apart...
    3 rifles and maybe 10 barrels.....and I got adventurist one summer.... 6 boxes of brass, sat there looking me in the face......
    Heck, so I tried them out. They were pretty old brass.....
    The only problem was sticky brass on opening.....
    I sold one of the rifles. And am down to 3 boxes of brass.
    NOW A BIG NOTE. I was shooting these brass at "local score matches".....
    Group NBRSA Tournaments. I use very new brass. 2 Tournaments and they become score brass. 20 pcs. at a time.....
    I am trying to win my second Group Tournament... and maybe some Eastern Region HOF points......ER NBRSA is tough to win in.....

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    S.E. MI
    Posts
    2,191
    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    Ohhh Yeahhh, "Nuclear Industry" and "Rocket Science"......

    just saying the words makes the whole rest of the world feel inadequate.....


    NOT!!!



    LOL
    Yep.
    A "Yard Bird" who wants a day off, can destroy a 688 boat.
    Some jerk off started a fire in his vacuum cleaner. He got a lot of days off.

    "On 1 March 2012 Miami pulled into the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine for a scheduled 20-month Engineered Overhaul (EOH) and system upgrades. A civilian employee started a fire aboard the boat on 23 May 2012. It impacted the forward compartment of the submarine which includes crew living, command and control spaces and torpedo room. The revised estimate to restore Miami increased to approximately $450 million with completion estimated on 30 April 2015. A further damage assessment found that more extensive repairs and fire damaged equipment replacement were necessary, which raised the expected cost from $450 million to $700 million. Due to budget cuts, it was announced 6 August 2013 that the vessel would not be repaired and placed on the inactive list.[1] On 28 March 2014, Miami was formally decommissioned.[2]"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Miami_(SSN-755)

    He got.
    "On 15 March 2013 Fury was sentenced to over 17 years in federal prison and ordered to pay $400 million in restitution.[14]"

    The best Prison sentence of an offender ever....

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    S.E. MI
    Posts
    2,191
    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    I completely agree. It's a fascinating industry employing many highly skilled and specialized people...... just like the automotive industry, the building industry, big oil, shipbuilding and maintenance (getting a glimpse into Jackie's world is such a treat) or any other facet of our lives. My father-in-law and his brother were inventors in America's Golden Age Of Innovation..... they actually LIVED the growth curve, starting in Detroit with "The Kings Of Industry", he even settled in the UP where Henry Ford, Harvey Firestone, Thomas Edison, Ernest Hemingway etc spent their summers.... Back when we could do/build/explore/conquer anything. He designed and built equipment for making experimental stuff for CalTech, MIT, NASA ....... when we needed stuff we just stepped up and BUILT IT! And if we couldn't move it, make a bigger machine.....Letourneau's 'Of Men And Machines' gives us a glimpse into heavy equipment, then, when one has relatives and friends working those huge mines it's neat to go look closer..... to stand in a loader bucket that will carry your entire home......


    I'm blessed to know literally hundreds of people working from under water and underground to the edge of space and it's ALL just friggin' too cool for words....INLUDING the nuclear power industry (or the plutonium industry LOL) but I grew up around the phrase "well, it ain't rocket science" only to grow up and find that NASA is about as dysfunctional as our local building dept and for the most part no brighter. And the power production/distribution industry is definitely a fascinating one.......I've got friends at Bonneville Power, many of my relatives lived and died with Hanford and Trojan, and now lotsa' folks involved with them stupid windmills lol....

    Anyways, wasn't pickin' on ya'.... just completely disagreeing with the idea that high end accuracy is "simple compared to complicated stuff like nuke/space)"

    cuz it AIN'T
    Yep.
    Not picking......
    I just ran across an vid about all those windmills. They only last 15-20 yrs........WTF....???!!!!
    They produce less power, than it takes, to make them and they are all SH*T after a few yrs.....We used to make cars that lasted longer....I see trucks hauling salt that are older than me.....
    WTF!

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    S.E. MI
    Posts
    2,191
    Quote Originally Posted by chino69 View Post
    Jerry, isn't FL sizing every time also to make all the brass as consistent as possible? Does anyone, not competition BR, just neck size anymore?
    It's neck size and FL size.....
    Some guys under size. With a duel port. Quick in and quick out.....200 y and consistent wind, shoot has fast as you can....
    I call it the Joe Krupa method. Or the Wayne Campbell method. Of winning at 200y. Wayne waits till the last 2 minutes to shoot.....

    I have tried it....shooting as fast as you can. It mostly works...But, when everyone is shooting as fast as you can............it's always nice to see all bullets touching....
    Joe and Wayne seemed to have smaller groups........

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    washington.........STATE that is.
    Posts
    10,278
    Quote Originally Posted by zippy06 View Post
    Yep.
    Not picking......
    I just ran across an vid about all those windmills. They only last 15-20 yrs........WTF....???!!!!
    They produce less power, than it takes, to make them and they are all SH*T after a few yrs.....We used to make cars that lasted longer....I see trucks hauling salt that are older than me.....
    WTF!

    nope, nope nope ya' got's that all wrong...... they're PROJECTED TO LAST 15-20yrs. In reality they don't often make it past 10, and often don't make 5yrs.

    Can you spell BOON?

    and DOGGLE???

    These bad boys MIGHT be worse than corn fuel.... I'm just too lazy to compare. And if I feel the need to get fired up, I just have to look downriver to my old sturgeon fishing hole in Kalama WA where the Green New Feelies are spending 10 BILLION of your dollars on "something" that's been sold as a "methanol/ethanol plant slash/refuse/garbage converter thingamajig.... I've actually watched the local papers, read the signs and spoken with folks involved as this thing has evolved over the last 8yrs. Freakin' AMAZING how people refuse to think.

    PT Barnum is being proven wrong too..... it's getting on to where you'se can fool most of the people most of the time.


    "We the peeple" vote for this stuff


    I'm finding more and more that this is one of the reasons I'm so drawn to guns, shooting and extreme accuracy.

    I AM THE DE-LIAR in this neck of the woods. Ten tons of concrete to shoot from in a controlled environment with a machine shop and reloading room just steps away. Bring it on over and show me. We can settle this arg'ement and have fun doing it. Unlike billion dollar politics and policies, around here we can TEST stuff. Ain't nobody in it for the money. (not to say it ain't a skunkworks..... we got production lines waiting by for The Big Idea )

    You think bullets go to sleep???? Well then come on over... we'll pop some over the air target.

    You think you got a better way to hit stuff at 600yds???..... let' build it!

    You think you got a quarter minnit huntin' gun???..... bring it.

    You think that muzzle brake is better....... put 'er on the sled

    You want to shoot a real gun? ..... COME ON OVER!!

    Keeps my mind off them stupid windmills!!

    LOL


    al

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    "Canal Town",USA
    Posts
    593

    Maybe some help

    From my experience( very limited), It seems if a tapered chamber( like a 6ppc) is head spaced go+0 then the brass from that chamber will function well in other go+0 chambers. Should a gunsmith headspace a chamber go +.002 or .003 or.004( not uncommon)even with the same reamer, the fired brass from that chamber(multiple firings and mimimal resizing) would "click at the top" in a go+0 chamber, being as the major diameter of the longer than normal case was never sized fully in the standard length re-sizing die.
    Other factors like chamber run out and the effects of polishing or not polishing the interior of the chamber come into play, but using 4 or 5 different ppc chamber reamers in my " el cheapo" Grizzly lathe, all of my brass is interchangeable through multiple firings and different barrels.
    Same problems occur when guys fire form initially with a full "wham-o" powerhouse load in a go + chamber.
    If you take it easy with your first fire form in a go+0 chamber you should have no problems moving that brass to other barrels.
    Joel

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    washington.........STATE that is.
    Posts
    10,278
    Quote Originally Posted by Nader View Post
    From my experience( very limited), It seems if a tapered chamber( like a 6ppc) is head spaced go+0 then the brass from that chamber will function well in other go+0 chambers. Should a gunsmith headspace a chamber go +.002 or .003 or.004( not uncommon)even with the same reamer, the fired brass from that chamber(multiple firings and mimimal resizing) would "click at the top" in a go+0 chamber, being as the major diameter of the longer than normal case was never sized fully in the standard length re-sizing die.
    Other factors like chamber run out and the effects of polishing or not polishing the interior of the chamber come into play, but using 4 or 5 different ppc chamber reamers in my " el cheapo" Grizzly lathe, all of my brass is interchangeable through multiple firings and different barrels.
    Same problems occur when guys fire form initially with a full "wham-o" powerhouse load in a go + chamber.
    If you take it easy with your first fire form in a go+0 chamber you should have no problems moving that brass to other barrels.
    Joel
    Are you using Gordie Gritters' method on your Grizzly?

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    "Canal Town",USA
    Posts
    593
    Al,
    I'm not sure how Gordy chambers barrels. I didn't want to spend the 50 bucks for the video. My friend and shooting buddy Andy Laidlaw from north of the border got me started about 6 years ago. I don't know where he picked it up but I would bet he didn't part with the $66.50 Canadian.
    In a nutshell, rough cut the shoulder and tenon, bore and ream the chamber, thread and make final headspace with a finish shoulder cut, cut the cone, done.
    Easy to nail the headspace with that last .002-.005 shoulder cut.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •