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Thread: Tell Me About Your Rem 700 5R .308

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    West central NH
    Posts
    423

    Tell Me About Your Rem 700 5R .308

    Anyone have one? Like it? Hate it? What does it like or hate?

    I bought one just for grins, but haven't scoped it yet. Might not get to shoot it until spring. I do have a Rifle Basix 4 oz. trigger on the way.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    43
    I've had a Remington 700 heavy barrel Mil-Spec 5R in .308 for about a year-and-a half. Shoots very well with many bullets. I can't shoot a 1/2" or 5/8" group with it every time like the Internet guys that own the "all day long rifles", but I've fired enough groups to know it's an accurate rifle. I have a similar gun in .300 Winchester Magnum that does about as well. However, neither gun shoots any better than the 700 VS (Varmint Synthetic) in .308 that I bought about twenty-five years ago. It, of course, has conventional rifling.

    As for "5R", I suspect it's a marketing gimmick more than anything else, but that's based on a small sampling and the opinion of a self-proclaimed non-expert.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Branchville, NJ
    Posts
    447
    The 5-R rifling was created for use with full metal jacketed bullets. The idea is that with no opposing lands, the bullets are not squeeze as much. All lead core jacketed bullets get squeezed when fired, but hollow point match bullets has room I the jacket nose for the lead to extrude to. The FMJ bullet extrudes lead out the base, disrupting the air flow. The Brits discovered this back with their Enfield rifles. This is why the US Military uses 5-R in the sniper rifles, so that they can shoot standard ball rounds also,

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Albany, OR
    Posts
    156
    Quote Originally Posted by MilGunsmith View Post
    The 5-R rifling was created for use with full metal jacketed bullets. The idea is that with no opposing lands, the bullets are not squeeze as much. All lead core jacketed bullets get squeezed when fired, but hollow point match bullets has room I the jacket nose for the lead to extrude to. The FMJ bullet extrudes lead out the base, disrupting the air flow. The Brits discovered this back with their Enfield rifles. This is why the US Military uses 5-R in the sniper rifles, so that they can shoot standard ball rounds also,
    I had never heard that - thanks for commenting!

    GsT

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