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Big Gunner
05-18-2015, 12:15 PM
Folks,

I've purchased a 7' x 14' x 6'-6" tandem axle, round-front cargo trailer to set up and use for matches. I do not plan to sleep in it, just set it up for loading/cleaning/storage.

I had it insulated, paneled, and wired for air-conditioning/heating from the factory.

What I'd like is some thoughts and photos of how you all set them up and what worked and what didn't. No need for me to re-invent the wheel here.

I've seen many trailers set up for range use, but knowing what works and what you would have done differently would be a great help.

It has barn doors in the rear (not a ramp), and a DRIVER's side kitchen door.

Any suggestions on cabinets, racks, storage tricks would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Lisa Spendlove

Wilbur
05-18-2015, 12:40 PM
I never had a trailer but saw a bunch. You really don't need this to be anything but dry. Put something in there to keep your stuff from sliding around and try to keep the holes to a minimum. In other words, don't build it such that you have to use it or not go.

Steelhead1
05-18-2015, 02:12 PM
Big Gunner, in the BR Central search block type Lowell Frei's Trailer, hitthe search button and when the results come up, click on the first one which talks about the Cactus and Trailers! I tried to copy and paste it but no joy! This should give you a few ideas.

Gary

Big Gunner
05-18-2015, 02:53 PM
Thanks Steelhead1,

I have looked at this photo many times, and agree that it is a great place to start. I was hoping that I could get some ideas for ways to store flagpoles, flags, rests, etc. that didn't have them all packed up in containers and stacked on the floor.

I know that this is a bad time to ask questions (Super Shoot and all), but I'm trying to get it up and running before the summer is completely over.

Also, I don't see any provision for rifle cleaning in Lowell's trailer.

This is a trailer that I would use a couple of times per week for most of the year.

On the Oregon coast where I live (and shoot) it rains more days than not. Like Wilbur pointed out, all you really need to do is to stay dry. However, reloading at my local range is problematic: They have no covered area to setup or load in, so I end up putting up a tent. By the time I haul everything out of my house and load in the truck I'm soaking wet. When I get to the range I have to set up a tent in the rain, unload the truck, and set up the tables and such for reloading. Then load the truck back up in the rain, and unload it back at the house (in the rain).

I would like to be able to be set up to use and store (4) bag guns, a Heavy Bench gun (Railgun), all of the reloading components, all the reloading tools, 4 rests and bag combinations, an entire rotation of windflags/stands/repair parts, spare barrels, all the cleaning gear, reloading presses, dies, powder, bullets, and miscellaneous tools that go along with spending a week shooting at a range far from home.

The idea is to load the trailer once and never unload it. Only replace items that have been consumed.

Drive to the range, fire up the generator, unpack some items inside and start shooting. I would only get wet setting the flags.

I added it up one day, and I spend almost as much time moving the equipment back and forth to the truck as I do shooting.

I'm hoping that someone is willing to share some of their ideas.

Thanks,

Lisa

Big Gunner
05-18-2015, 03:29 PM
How do you store the stuff you do leave in the trailer?

Lisa

Centerfire
05-18-2015, 04:52 PM
I would decide which door you are going to use first. Then lets say the back door is the primary. All the heavy, not used all the time items would go toward the front for the side door access. I like Schedule 40 or 80 PVC pipe in various diameters for storage of poles, etc. I think having a tarp for the floor and a 10' x 10' cover outside the rear door would be nice for the longer encampments at the range.
Centerfire

HovisKM
05-19-2015, 09:18 AM
Are you going to be sleeping in the trailer at shoots? If so, there is a very good way of setting it up. In my trailer (it's a V-nose), I have the loading table built in the V with cabinets above it. Bolted the loading/range box to it. Have measurer stands and presses mounted. Underneath it. I have a small fridge that goes in the middle. It's six foot wide and two can load comfortably side by side. For storing cleaning rods, by the fishing rod foam hangers and mount them on the wall. I have never had a rod come out and I traveled a lot.

The reason I asked about sleeping. I put a full size bed in the back with a normal mattress and it sets on 2x12's on end. I hinged everything. I store simple stuff under the bed but it will also flip up against the wall out of the way and held in place by straps. The Toughest thing to store is the daisy's for wind flags, I have totes that I use for that and misc stuff.

Hovis

HFVINC
05-27-2015, 04:29 PM
We have the two range boxes and a wooden step for entry and exit of the back door that fits over those two boxes strapped down with web straps and tie down loops bolted through the floor. That holds that stuff down. Two powder measure stands are bolted to the 1.5 inch thick loading table. We have a rack behind the loading table and the loading tool box is strapped to it. Flags disassemble and are held in a cloth pocket that is strapped to the table for transport. The poles are in a plastic waste basket strapped to a folding rifle cleaning table that is strapped to one side wall for transport. Tarps and range carts are stowed in the front floor for the trailer. The more delicate things, such as powder measures, are carried in the tow vehicle in another wood box. Trailer equipment such as trailer stands, wheel chocks, hitch equipment and such are carried and stored in a box on the trailer tongue. Have I hit a thousands words yet? I don't have pictures. We can set up and tear down pretty efficiently, just like gypsies except the women and children are safe.

I;ll tell you how I built mine,,,, I bought it ready to go from Douglas Barrels. Great loading trailer until Tooley talked me out of it. Tim installed two marine batterys and the power converter, loading bench,, tool box holder w/tie downs. Also tie down rings (flush floor mounted) to tie anything that may bounce around during travel. He also installed an awning on each side,, for outside loading and cleaning.

r44astro
05-27-2015, 04:46 PM
I would talk to Dave Halblom. His is very organized and has more ideas for his next trailer
Bill

David Halblom
05-28-2015, 06:02 PM
Check you private messages.

David Halblom

C.L. Peterson
05-28-2015, 09:41 PM
Folks,

I've purchased a 7' x 14' x 6'-6" tandem axle, round-front cargo trailer to set up and use for matches. I do not plan to sleep in it, just set it up for loading/cleaning/storage.

I had it insulated, paneled, and wired for air-conditioning/heating from the factory.

What I'd like is some thoughts and photos of how you all set them up and what worked and what didn't. No need for me to re-invent the wheel here.

I've seen many trailers set up for range use, but knowing what works and what you would have done differently would be a great help.

It has barn doors in the rear (not a ramp), and a DRIVER's side kitchen door.

Any suggestions on cabinets, racks, storage tricks would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Lisa Spendlove

1st suggestion
Build a box 2 foot X 2 foot square x 8 inches tall--cut lift handles/holes in all 4 sides (Use good solid lumber)
Use this to store the bench rests, both front and rear.
Also any other items that you want on the bench.
Once at the range place items on the bench.
Bring box back (Flip over) to the trailer door for a safe/solid step into the trailer.
Reverse this procedure when leaving the range.

2nd suggestion
Pick up one (or use your own if you have) a pull cart for a golf bag--the smallest & lest expensive the better.
Place poles onto base of cart (May have to use wooden block with drilled holes)
Secure top of poles with strap that hold golf bag in place.
When at the range take out and roll toward the target board placing poles at appropriate distances.
When through reverse--secure cart inside trailer to keep in one location.

3rd Suggestion
Just outside the door place a grab bar to help getting into and out of trailer.
Especially helpful with hand full of items or for your senior shooters.

4th Suggestion
Build it stronger than you think you need.
The trailer shakes/rattles/rolls much more than you think.

5th Suggestion
I suggest you let the Guns/scopes and other more delicate items ride in the vehicle with you.

CLP

Big Gunner
05-28-2015, 11:11 PM
Thanks for all the suggestions. I really appreciate them.

Lisa

CubCouper
06-01-2015, 05:50 PM
I have a trailer similarly sized to the yours, and when I was outfitting it, I took a bunch of ideas from shooter Paul Holland of Big Fork Montana. Paul is a genuine craftsmen and also very pragmatic in his design. He rigged it for loading down one side, and has a fold-down cot on the other side for light-duty camping. He has boxes mounted above the wheel wells on the outside to hold things like tarps and tent poles, camp stove and cooking equipment. He has racks mounted to the rear door to flags. And most important, the trailer is wired with lots of electrical outlets down the walls for all the chargers, scales, radios, etc. that we try to plug in. Paul has lived in his trailer for months going from shoot to shoot.

My own trailer has the fold-down cot, and capacity for 32 plug-in devices (8 four-plex boxes!). Some of the ranges that I drag the trailer to have *extremely rough* roads, and don't always take the trailer, so I opted for so open-box style shelves rather than cabinets. My gear gets put put away in my boxes, but all the boxes are stored on the floor and bunged to prevent them from sliding around. I had an event a few years ago where I hit a pot hole in the highway. When I got the range, it looked like a bomb had gone off in my trailer. Toolboxes tipped over, broken, spilt bullets everywhere, a real mess.

Other thoughts... hooks along the outside that allow you to stretch a tarp out for an awning... makes for a shady place to set up a cleaning table too.

Biggest advise: make sure you can lock everything down so it won't roll or slide around. Paper plates might just rattle around in a cupboard, but a box of bullets flying through the air will tear a door off.