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View Full Version : Re-bedding a action question...........



scott mims
01-17-2015, 10:00 PM
i did a search and didnt find any info i wanted.
whats your opinion of re-bedding your action? would it improve/hurt accuracy? is it something the "top" shooters do often?
I've had my rifle for 11 years and my mind is running away with questions of what i could do to it to make it shoot better (not counting practice) :) just "jobs" i could get my gunsmith to do that might help............. without selling everything i have and buying a new rifle (truck/clothes/shoes/ect........) :)
anyway would you re-bed or not?

thanks

and im sure it would help if you could see groups ect.............. im just wondering if you ever do a re-bedding job just to do it. like i said my mind is running :)

Dusty Stevens
01-17-2015, 10:19 PM
If you cant pull it apart by hand dont worry about it. Im sure its still glued in just the way terry did it and if youve been using a bore guide which i know you have it will last a very long time

adamsgt
01-17-2015, 10:36 PM
Last year I was taking my HV gun out of the bags after the last match and had grabbed the barrel with my left hand. The barrel started come out of the stock as I raised the gun. The rear part of the action stayed in the stock but everything forward of that had come unglued. Don't know exactly when it came unglued, but there had been no noticeable change in the groups right to the end. Go figure. :confused:

scott mims
01-17-2015, 10:41 PM
thanks yall

Wilbur
01-21-2015, 03:28 PM
When I began benchrest shooting I read a lot of stuff. There were 3 short articles written by somebody that were somewhat enlightening. I knew who it was a minute ago but had to take ol' Jed out and forgot. Anyway, he wrote that a properly bedded rifle would shoot well if the action was simply taped into the stock. I kinda believe that.

My super Panda rifle that I bought from Keith Gantt was a really, really, really good rifle until I got a few barrels in a row that were less than super - and I worked on it. Conversely, I would guess that there are rifles that could possibly win if they WERE worked on. It's a crap shoot for sure. What I do know for sure (FOR SURE) is that if you're not winning every now and then you need to change something.....anything at all. Keep changing until you have a winner then let it alone. You're not starting over when the barrel wears out and try not to think the rifle is broke. It may be broke but it's not likely that the rifle broke the same time the barrel wore out. It's somewhat difficult to remember that after three or four barrels.


Thought of that name - Bob Pease it was....

Mike Bryant
01-24-2015, 01:29 PM
When I began benchrest shooting I read a lot of stuff. There were 3 short articles written by somebody that were somewhat enlightening. I knew who it was a minute ago but had to take ol' Jed out and forgot. Anyway, he wrote that a properly bedded rifle would shoot well if the action was simply taped into the stock. I kinda believe that.

My super Panda rifle that I bought from Keith Gantt was a really, really, really good rifle until I got a few barrels in a row that were less than super - and I worked on it. Conversely, I would guess that there are rifles that could possibly win if they WERE worked on. It's a crap shoot for sure. What I do know for sure (FOR SURE) is that if you're not winning every now and then you need to change something.....anything at all. Keep changing until you have a winner then let it alone. You're not starting over when the barrel wears out and try not to think the rifle is broke. It may be broke but it's not likely that the rifle broke the same time the barrel wore out. It's somewhat difficult to remember that after three or four barrels.


Thought of that name - Bob Pease it was....

I have Bob Pease's collections of articles somewhere. Bob was in to hunter class back then. Of course, hunter class couldn't be a glue in and had to be bedded. He made the statement in his articles that to check to see how well the rifle was bedded, you could take the front screw loose, shoot a shot. Tighten it up and loosen off the back screw, shoot a shot. Shoot a shot with both screws tight and they should all be in the same hole. A friend of mine was shooting a match at Okie Shooters back in the early 80's. He shot a .140" group dead center of the ten ring. The next group his action came unglued and fell out of the stock. It wasn't much more than tape holding it in for the previous five shots.

xs hedspace
02-01-2015, 01:09 PM
If your rifle isn't shooting like it used to, the first thing I would do is to recrown the barrel. Hot gases can erode the muzzle, and two of my LR target rifles went back to tight groups after I recrowned the barrels just 1/4" back. Assuming you tried seating bullets out to match throat erosion....