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reelxprs
11-01-2013, 07:08 PM
I know a few bullet makers are making 118 gr to 125 gr boattails. Has anyone tried them at 600 yds especially for score due to their larger diameter.
I was just wondering if this combo could do to this game as it did to 100 to 300 yd game?
Jeff

James M.
11-01-2013, 07:12 PM
No, the extra diameter will not overcome the poor ballistic coefficient of the short .30 caliber bullet. The long VLD bullets in 6mm, 6.5mm, 7mm, and .30 caliber rule the longer ranges. James

David Halblom
11-01-2013, 08:13 PM
No, the extra diameter will not overcome the poor ballistic coefficient of the short .30 caliber bullet. The long VLD bullets in 6mm, 6.5mm, 7mm, and .30 caliber rule the longer ranges. James

one aspect of your statement. It is not the VLD's playground. Flatbase 30's are getting it done as well. Definitely long, heavy bullets, but VLD is not the ruler, just the king by self-acclimation.

Charles E
11-01-2013, 09:19 PM
Actually -- and as one who doesn't shoot 600 yards, but considerable 1,000 yard experience -- I'd say that for .30 caliber and 600 yards, middle-weight bullets are the place you should be looking with a .308. I take that to be 165 grains on the low end, and 210 on the high, with 185 to 190 just about ideal.

It isn't just weight & B.C. There is also the twist needed. So, a 190-grain bullet at around 3,000 fps can usually work in a 13-twist, and a 210 at 3,000 a 12-twist. That's actual experience, done it, got the T-shirt.

Heavy 30 bullets, as Brian Litz pointed out, are in the 230-240 grain range.

If I were building a .30 for 600 yards, it would be based on a .308 Winchester, or maybe a .30/06, or 7.5x55 Swiss (my personal choice, as I have brass). I'd probably start with the 185-grain bullet range. Anything bigger would be asking for the heavyweight bullets & 10-twist, and I'd think limited to a Heavy Gun (no weight limit).

The success of the 6mm in BR -- or BRX or Dasher lies, I think, in that it is a good compromise in terms of accuracy, wind drift, and recoil in the 17-pound rifles. 17-pounds isn't as much as one might think. I own & have shot a big .338 in a 17-pound rifle, and it's worse than a .308 in a 10-pound rifle, particularly with the torque.

But to answer your question, no. A short-range 30-BR has won a 600 yard match or two, but not often.

Edit:

There is plent of room for experimentation at 600 with the 30's, but if you just want to win & not fuss, the 6mm with 95-110 grain bullets makes it easy.

alinwa
11-01-2013, 11:32 PM
Charles you shoot your Jeffery-cased 338 in a 17lb rifle w/NO BRAKE???

You ARE a nut!

al

Charles E
11-02-2013, 04:54 AM
you shoot your Jeffery-cased 338 in a 17lb rifle w/NO BRAKE???

No, it has a brake. Brakes are allowed in long range (600 or 1K).

As a note, the rifle was built by Joel Pendergraft, and I was with him for it's maiden voyage, breaking in barrel, working up a load, that sort of thing. This involves considerable cleaning, for which you take the brake off. Inevitably, I suppose, Joel forgot to put the brake on once after cleaning.

I believe he said "Goodness!" -- strong language from Joel, who runs about 6'5" and weighs close to 250.

JerrySharrett
11-02-2013, 07:12 AM
one aspect of your statement. It is not the VLD's playground. Flatbase 30's are getting it done as well. Definitely long, heavy bullets, but VLD is not the ruler, just the king by self-acclimation.

IF you can get the VLD's started perfectly they do rule, but only IF!!

jim1K
11-02-2013, 07:43 AM
There is no if........... jim