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qewing
10-13-2013, 07:58 AM
I shoot primarily smaller varmint and benchrest calibers, so I don't have any experience with magnum primers. This question concerns a. 22-250. My Speer reloading manual specifies magnum primers for 760 and H380 powders. Well, I don't have any. What would be the effect of using regular large rifle primers? Would I lose any velocity? Any effect on pressure? In a case the size of the. 22-250, would I have ignition problems? Thanks for answers, guys (and gals).

John S
10-13-2013, 08:45 AM
Magnum Primers are often used with ball powders.

Will you be able to tell the difference? You will need both to find out.

R.DesJardin
10-13-2013, 09:16 AM
I shoot primarily smaller varmint and benchrest calibers, so I don't have any experience with magnum primers. This question concerns a. 22-250. My Speer reloading manual specifies magnum primers for 760 and H380 powders. Well, I don't have any. What would be the effect of using regular large rifle primers? Would I lose any velocity? Any effect on pressure? In a case the size of the. 22-250, would I have ignition problems? Thanks for answers, guys (and gals).

Spherical propellants have a total coating to control burn and the use of magnum primers is generally recommended because of this. This gives a "hotter" initial burn or maybe I should say more initial flame. There used to be photos of different primer burn patterns somewhere on the net. Misfires would be a concern, especially in colder temps. But I'm sure someone will say I've done it for years and it always worked for me. Reloading manuals are made after untold hours of shooting samples and studying pressure and velocity data. They don't go by the bolt hard to lift or primer flattening theories. I once did a primer flattening test using 3 caliber P&V barrels. I stopped before I got "flat" primers because the pressures where getting "STUPID" high.

kansasvet
10-13-2013, 11:28 AM
I have used Win. 760 in a Rem. 40X 22-250 since 1976. I have always used Win. LR primers and not had any problems.
Win. powder manuals never recommended the magnum primer.
For some forgotten reason, I was led to believe Win. LR primers were hotter than CCI or Federal.

vicvanb
10-14-2013, 12:26 AM
But I'm sure someone will say I've done it for years and it always worked for me.

I've used WW 760 in several 220 Swifts for many years. Used mostly Federal Large Rifle primers--never magnum. Never had a misfire or a hangfire. My velocities are right in line with those in the reloading manuals. BUT...I never shot in extreme cold (ammo temps below zero). If I planned to I might switch to magnum primers. But as long as I'm shooting under "normal" conditions I'll stick to my regular routine.

Lee Martin
10-14-2013, 09:56 AM
I've never felt the need to shoot magnums in my Swifts or 22-250's. In fact, the only time I use LRMs in 22-cal is with my 224 Clark (under Retumbo or US 869 powder).

-Lee
www.singleactions.com

R.DesJardin
10-14-2013, 01:22 PM
Just to be clear I was just giving the reasons behind the recommendation, didn't say anyone was wrong for doing it.
But maybe if you guys ran mag primers your ES and SD would be better and you could shoot tighter groups. :D

John Kielly
10-14-2013, 05:31 PM
For some forgotten reason, I was led to believe Win. LR primers were hotter than CCI or Federal.
My recall was that they built them specifically to light up their ball powder.

UncleB
10-16-2013, 09:16 AM
I shoot primarily smaller varmint and benchrest calibers, so I don't have any experience with magnum primers. This question concerns a. 22-250. My Speer reloading manual specifies magnum primers for 760 and H380 powders. Well, I don't have any. What would be the effect of using regular large rifle primers? Would I lose any velocity? Any effect on pressure? In a case the size of the. 22-250, would I have ignition problems? Thanks for answers, guys (and gals).

Did a lot of testing years ago with a 220 Swift using these 2 powders and shot all loads through my Oehler chronograph.
Without exception the S.D. and E.S. numbers were higher using magnum primers, I also found H380 to be the most temp sensitive powder I have ever used and adding a magnum primer makes this even worse.
My go to load for more than a decade is W760 with a Fed210

vicvanb
10-16-2013, 12:42 PM
Did a lot of testing years ago with a 220 Swift using these 2 powders ...
My go to load for more than a decade is W760 with a Fed210

Me too...and a lot of other Swift fans also.

qewing
10-17-2013, 08:15 AM
Thanks, guys. I understand a lot more now about primers and ball powders. Fot now I will shoot what I have and be on the lookout for magnum primers. I will also break out mt chrono after a long time to see what is happening.

Larry Elliott
10-24-2013, 11:29 PM
Try the powder, whatever it is with standard primers, if you obtain satisfactory accuracy you're good to go, if not then try some magnums and see if there's any improvement. It can make a difference. I tried some CFE 223 with 75 gr Hornady HPBT's using Win SR primers with truly abysmal results. Switching to Rem 7.5's group sizes were cut in half or 2/3, and 7.5's aren't shown as magnum primers but are "hotter" than WSR's

GerryM
10-25-2013, 08:53 AM
Magnum primers Most mag primers have a harder to cup for higher pressures , also more , or hotter mixes of propellant in the cup.
Winchester primer are formulated for Ball powder. Winchester powders are double base with a lot of deterrent on them to control burning.
The ball powder is tad harder to light, but has a cooler flame Temperature. They are easier on barrels but foul more .

Doug Casner
10-25-2013, 10:51 AM
Magnum primers Most mag primers have a harder to cup for higher pressures , also more , or hotter mixes of propellant in the cup.
Winchester primer are formulated for Ball powder. Winchester powders are double base with a lot of deterrent on them to control burning.
The ball powder is tad harder to light, but has a cooler flame Temperature. They are easier on barrels but foul more .

Shot it in a .270 and a swift never used a mag primer. Doug