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adamsgt
10-03-2013, 11:41 AM
I've got a couple of new barrels to break-in and am considering going to coated bullets. I bought a lifetime supply of tungsten disulfide (danzac) last year. If I do coat the bullets should I wait until after I finish the break-in/fireform process or start with the coated bullets from the get go? I downloaded a file from this site that included a break-in process from Speedy Gonzalez that used a lot of cleaning steps. Would that negate the use of a bullet coating during the initial process?

Boyd Allen
10-03-2013, 01:27 PM
My experience with breaking in high quality barrels has been that it does not take much to accomplish, and I have seen friends who work at it too hard end up chasing their tails because their cleaning method between break in shots was so severe as to prevent the creation of any "patina". ( Yes, this is just unscientific opinion.) I would do the break in with uncoated bullets, because any coating might interfere with smoothing the reamer marks in the throat.

abintx
10-03-2013, 03:36 PM
I've got a couple of new barrels to break-in and am considering going to coated bullets. I bought a lifetime supply of tungsten disulfide (danzac) last year. If I do coat the bullets should I wait until after I finish the break-in/fireform process or start with the coated bullets from the get go? I downloaded a file from this site that included a break-in process from Speedy Gonzalez that used a lot of cleaning steps. Would that negate the use of a bullet coating during the initial process?

If you don't like Speedy's method try Joe Krupa's:

"When I get a new barrel, I break it in with 25 pieces of newly turned brass.

I clean the new barrel, and then shoot 10 pieces to both fireform and break in the barrel. Then I clean the barrel and shoot the remaining 15.

After that, I clean the barrel and start tuning it with the first ten. I am convinced that you break in a barrel by shooting it than by cleaning it."

adamsgt
10-03-2013, 04:26 PM
I got both methods on the document I downloaded. I didn't say I didn't like speedy's method just whether it would make any coating irrelevant. I kind of like Krupa's method and will probably go that route. Now that I have some take off barrels I may try the "shoot 22 caliber bullets for the first fire form" method. I haven't checked Boyer's book yet to see what he does.

Andy Cross
10-03-2013, 06:34 PM
If you don't like Speedy's method try Joe Krupa's:

"When I get a new barrel, I break it in with 25 pieces of newly turned brass.

I clean the new barrel, and then shoot 10 pieces to both fireform and break in the barrel. Then I clean the barrel and shoot the remaining 15.

After that, I clean the barrel and start tuning it with the first ten. I am convinced that you break in a barrel by shooting it than by cleaning it."

I agree wholeheartedly. You don't break in with a cleaning rod. However I have come to the conclusion that the fowling from the first 50 shots or so is easier to remove if moly is involved. As far as reamer marks. There shouldn't be any. PSECO which is the rifle smith I use in Oz leaves the chamber looking like a mirror.
Andy

alinwa
10-03-2013, 07:50 PM
.......... PSECO which is the rifle smith I use in Oz leaves the chamber looking like a mirror.
Andy


????


al

82boy
10-03-2013, 10:14 PM
The thing is if your using a barrel that is hand lapped, it don't require a lot of break in. Some that shoot coated bullets prefer to break the barrel in with bullets that are not coated, as they believe that the coatings friction reducing property's hinder break in. On the barrels I have had where I shot coated bullets I never did any break in procedure, just shoot them from the start. They have all shot good, from the start, and lived long lives.

LBaggett
10-03-2013, 10:20 PM
If you are shooting moly, Just run a couple patches moly powder down barrel and shoot 5 or 6 shots and the barrel is broke in.

CubCouper
10-07-2013, 12:14 AM
If you're committed to shooting with moly (or danzac, or Hbn) you can pre-condition the barrel with a patch or two of your favorite coating as Larry mentioned. I have also used a wet patch of Kroil Penephite (colloidal graphite in Kroil penetrating oil) for that same purpose.

Pete Wass
10-07-2013, 08:57 AM
That Tony Boyer does not break in his barrels, what does that tell us?

bob3700
10-07-2013, 10:57 AM
Some of the gunsmiths I have used will lap the throat of the bbl with compound to remove the reamer marks.

You don't have to shoot n clean because the bbl is ready to go from the first shots. Throat is smooth and shinny from shot one.

Just one way to skin the cat!

Bob